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Helpline no. 0129-4259000

Helpline no. 0129-4259000

            ADMISSION_BROCHURE ONLINE COURSES

BBA LL.B. (Hons)

Duration 5 Years
Intake 60
Eligibility Criteria Pass in 10+2 Examination with 50% or more marks in aggregate in 5 subjects. Should have qualified English as a subject.
Merit Preparation for Admission Merit preparation/ short listing of candidates shall be on the basis of score in SAT/ CLAT/ MRNAT 2023 / 10+2 Qualifying Examination.

 

  • Manav Rachna now accepts Pearson Test Score for admission
  • A relaxation in cut-off percentage up to 10% subject to minimum eligibility requirements will be given to Kashmiri Migrants

 

 

Brief Description of the Program –  

 

Bachelor of Business Administration & Bachelor of Legislative Law (BA LLB) is a five-year course on completion of which the aspirants are offered a professional degree. BBA LLB is an integrated law course wherein aspirants are taught subjects related to Business Administration as well as Law. As part of a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) LLB course aspirants are first taught Commerce subjects such as Principles of Management, Financial Accounting, Computer Applications, Effective Communication, etc. Thereafter, aspirants are taught law subjects such as Law of Torts, Family Law, Constitutional Law, Property Law, Company Law, Administrative Law, Civil Law, Criminal Law, and the like. As part of an integrated BBA LLB course, aspirants are taught various topics by means of classroom teaching, case studies and moot courts. Candidates are taught education through a variety of methodologies; including study room teaching, case studies, and moot courts, as part of an integrated BBA LLB course. BBA LLB course combines management and business with law.

 

 

 

PEOs

 

PEO1: Foundation: Integration of Management subjects in the foundation years, provides adequate footing in understanding law and legal principles.

PEO2: Core Competence: Thorough understanding of legal concepts, principles and theories, quintessential to the discipline of Law.

PEO3: Skills: Analytical ability, logical reasoning, lateral thinking, attention for details and persuasive communication, are the skills that are critical to an accomplished legal professional.

PEO4: Professionalism: The ability to advise, counsel and represent the clients effectively and responsibly as legal professionals.

PEO5: Learning Environment: The holistic approach to law by reference to the socio-economic-legal and cultural environment in India, giving exposure to cutting edge issues leading to the experiential learning in an encouraging and open academic environment.

 

__________________________________________________

 

POs/PSOs

 

Law Graduates will be able to demonstrate

PO1: Knowledge Of Law: The knowledge of fundamental principles of Law, basic legislations and leading cases relating to the subjects, that form part of an undergraduate programs of study;

PO2: Communication Skills: Ability to express thoughts and ideas effectively in writing and orally; communicate with others using appropriate media; confidently share one’s views and express herself/ himself; demonstrate the ability to listen carefully, read and write analytically and present complex information in a clear and concise manner to different groups.

PO3: Critical Thinking: Capability to analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments, claims, beliefs on the basis of empirical evidence; identify relevant assumptions and implications; formulate coherent arguments; critically evaluate practices, policies and theories to development of knowledge and understanding.

PO4: Problem Solving: Capacity to extrapolate from what one has learned and apply their competencies to solve different kinds of legal problems, rather than replicate curriculum content knowledge; and apply one’s learning to real life situations.

PO5: Analytical Reasoning: Ability to evaluate the reliability and relevance of evidence; identify logical flaws and holes in the arguments of others; analyze and synthesize data from a variety of sources; draw valid conclusions and support them with evidence and examples, and address opposing viewpoints.

PO6: Research-related Skills: A sense of inquiry and capability for asking relevant/appropriate questions, synthesizing and articulating; Ability to recognize cause-and-effect relationships, define problems, formulate hypotheses, test hypotheses, analyze, interpret and draw conclusions from data, establish hypotheses, predict cause-and-effect relationships; ability to plan, execute and report the results of an experiment or investigation.

PO7: Moral and Ethical Awareness/Reasoning: Ability to embrace moral/ethical values in conducting one’s life, formulate a position/argument about an ethical issue from multiple perspectives, and use ethical practices in all work. Capable of demonstrating the ability to identify ethical issues related to one’s work, avoid unethical behaviour such as fabrication, falsification or misrepresentation of data or committing plagiarism, not adhering to intellectual property rights; appreciating environmental and sustainability issues; and adopting objective, unbiased and truthful actions in all aspects of work.

PO8: Professional Advocacy and Consultancy: Carry out advocacy and consultancy work in professional capacity and represent the matter of the client, before the court or any other appropriate forum in a professional manner.

PO9: Digital Literacy: Capability to use ICT in a variety of learning situations, demonstrate ability to access, evaluate, and use a variety of relevant information sources; and use appropriate software for analysis of data.

PO10: Self-directed Learning: Ability to work independently, identify appropriate resources required for a project, and manage a project through to completion.

 

__________________________________________________

 

Key Features

 

  • Approved by the Bar Council of India (BCI) and University Grants Commission (UGC).
  • Faculty from top notch institutions such as NLUs, JNU and foreign Universities.
  • Experiential Learning ‘Learning by Doing’.
  • Various Centres of Excellence and Research Groups have been formed such as Centre for Corporate Law and ADR, Centre for Legislative Studies and Research, Centre for Environmental Laws and Climate Change, Centre for Food and Health Laws, Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Technology Laws, Centre for Sports and Media Laws, Law and Forensics Research Group etc.
  • Strong linkages with industry, corporates, law firms, Senior Advocates of the various High Courts and the Supreme Court of India, and regulatory bodies which helps to facilitate internships and placements
  • Use of inclusive pedagogies
  • Inter-disciplinary approach
  • State of the art infrastructure
  • Student participation in International and National Moot Court Competitions, Client Counselling and Mediation Competitions, Judgment Writing, International and National Conferences and Seminars etc.
  • Emphasis on Clinical Legal Education
  • Strong emphasis on professional training and holistic personality development
  • Locational Advantage, 10 mins from the Badkal Lake or NHPC Metro Station

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________________

 

Program Structure

 

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

SEMESTER I
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH101 Law of Torts Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH102 Law of Contract-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH114 Principles of Management Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH115 Financial Accounting-I Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH116 Introduction to Economics Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH106 Legal English-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
SEMESTER II
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH107 Legal Methods Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH108 Law of Contract-II Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH117 Human Resource Management Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH118 Financial Accounting-II Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH119 Business and Growth Economics Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH112 Legal English-II Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWN113 Departmental Seminar-I Law Core 0 0 0 1
SEMESTER III
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH201 Constitutional Law-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH202 Family Law-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH203 Law of Crimes-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH215 Marketing Management Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH216 Business Mathematics Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH217 Financial Management Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWO207 Internship Viva-I Law Core 0 0 0 1
SEMESTER IV
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
CHH 137 Environmental Sciences CH Core 2 1 0 2
LWH208 Constitutional Law-II Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH209 Family Law-II Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH210 Law of Crimes -II Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH219 Organizational Behaviour Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH212 Legal and Constitutional History Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWN214 Departmental Seminar-II Law   0 0 0 1
SEMESTER V
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH301 Administrative Law Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH302 Company Law Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH303 Criminal Procedure Code Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH304 Law of Evidence Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH305 Legal Enterprises Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH314 Strategic Management Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWO307 Internship Viva-II Law Core 0 0 0 1
SEMESTER VI
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH308 Civil Procedure Code and Limitation Act Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH309 Labour Laws Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH310 Property Law Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH311 Clinic-I (ADR) Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWS312 Philosophy Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH315 Management Information System Management Core 4 1 0 4
SEMESTER VII
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH401 Land Laws Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH402 Intellectual Property Rights-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH403 Clinic-II (Drafting, Pleading and Conveyancing ) Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH404 Law on Mergers and Acquisitions Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH405 Competition Law Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH406 JUVENILE JUSTICE Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH407 CRIMINOLOGY, VICTIMOLOGY, PENOLOGY Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWO409 Internship Viva-III Law Core 0 0 0 1
FLS101 Spanish-I CDC Core 2 0 0 2
FLS102

 

German-I CDC Core 2 0 0 2
FLS103 French-I CDC Core 2 0 0 2
SEMESTER VIII
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH410 Principles of Taxation Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH411 Intellectual Property Rights-II Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH412 Clinic-III (Moot Court) Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH413 Insolvency and Bankruptcy Law Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWN414 Law on Infrastructure Development Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH415 Socio-Economic Offences Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH416 Forensic Science and Criminal Law Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
FLS105 Spanish-II CDC Core 2 0 0 2
FLS106 German-II CDC Core 2 0 0 2
FLS107 French-II CDC Core 2 0 0 2
SEMESTER IX
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH501 Public International Law and Human Rights Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH502 Environmental Law Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH503 Information Technology and Telecommunications Law Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH504 Banking and Insurance Law Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH505 Commercial Arbitration – Theory and Doctrines Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH506 GENDER JUSTICE Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH507 INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN AND REFUGEE LAW Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWO508 Internship Viva-IV Law Core 0 0 0 1
SEMESTER X
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH509 Clinic-IV (Professional Ethics and Professional Accounting System) Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH510 Private International Law Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH511 Interpretation of Statues Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH512 Securities Law and Market Regulations Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH513 International Investment Law Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH514 CYBER CRIMES AND LAW Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWH515 INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW Law ELECTIVE 4 1 0 4
LWO516 Internship Viva-V Law Core 0 0 0 1

 

TOTAL CREDITS SCHEME

S. No. Semester Contact Hours Credits
1 I 24 24
2 II 24 25
3 Summer Training (Post II Sem)    
4 III 24 25
5 IV 22 23
6 Summer Training (Post IV Sem)    
7 V 24 25
8 VI 24 24
9 Summer Training (Post 6th Sem)    
10 VI 22 23
11 VIII 18 22
12 Summer Training (Post 8th Sem)    
13 IX 20 21
14 X 20 21
15 Summer Training (Post 10th Sem)    
                    Total 222 233

 

 

 

 

_________________________________________________

 

Scheme & Syllabus

 

SEMESTER I

DETAILED SYLLABUS

Course Title/ Code Law of Torts (LWH101)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The objective of this paper is to make students understand the nature of tort and conditions of liability. The paper also includes Consumer Protection Act and Motor Vehicle Act. The case law method is adopted in order to bring clarity of concepts and applied law.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 Identify tortious wrongs, types and liability and differentiate tort from criminal, Contractual and equitable wrongs. Employability
CO2 Apply the principles relating to negligence, nuisance, trespass and other specific torts to the problem at hand Employability
CO3 Undertake advocacy in consumer matters falling under Consumer Protection laws. Skill development
CO4 Counsel and represent the client/ party in the matters falling under Motor Vehicles Act at appropriate forum. Entrepreneurship
Prerequisites if any  

 

SECTION A

Introduction and Principles of Liability in Torts (Contact hours -15)

  1. Tort: Meaning, Definition and Nature; Distinction of tort from crime, contract and equity; Changing concept of torts – Difference between torts and tort; Objectives of Tort Law
  2. Mental Elements of torts: Intention, Motive and Malice
  3. Types of Torts – Negligence Based, Strict Liability Torts and Intentional Torts
  4. Types of Liability – Vicarious, Strict and Absolute liability and its application in India
  5. Concept of locus standi: who may sue? Class action suits

 

SECTION B

Tort of Negligence and Nuisance (Contact hours -15)

  1. Concept of Negligence
  2. Harm (Foreseeability of Harm as test)
  3. Liability due to negligence– Proximate Cause; Last Opportunity Rule; Res Ipsa Loquitur; Contributory Negligence and Composite negligence
  4. Liability for negligence- Professional negligence including medical negligence, Occupier of Premises
  5. Tort of Nuisance: Acts constituting nuisance- Private and Public

SECTION C

Civil wrongs against Person and Property (Contact hours -15)

  1. Torts against persons and body: assault, battery, false imprisonment, malicious prosecution; defamation
  2. Wrongs affecting property: moveable and immovable: trespass; Conversion, Passing off, Injury to Trademark, Patent and Copyright
  3. Defenses to torts: volenti non-fit injuria, Vis Major (Act of God); Inevitable Accident; Necessity, Act of third Party; Plaintiff’s Default; Mistake; Sovereign Immunity
  4. Extinguishment of liability: waiver, accord, satisfaction, release; statutory authority; judicial and quasi-judicial acts, parental and quasi-parental authority
  5. Remedies under tort law: Damages, Injunction, Restitution of property, Extra-legal remedies

SECTION D

Statutory Tort – CPA andMVA (Contact hours -15)

  1. Product Liability – Theories of Causation, Defect and Proximate Reason; Misrepresentation and Negligence; Consumer Protection Act: Important definitions; Consumer Redressal forums, Reliefs and Remedies
  2. Motor Vehicles Act: Objectives, Principles, Chapter X, XI and XII and Relevant cases

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Pictorial Demonstration of Torts
  • Discussion over latest cases
  • Case Comments – Assignments
  • Holding Consumer Awareness camp
  • Visit to Lok Adalat/ Fast track courts

Text Books:

  1. M. Gandhi, Law of Torts with Law of Statutory Compensation and Consumer Protection,2019 (4thEdn.) Eastern Book Company, Nagpur
  2. K. Bangia, Law of Torts including Compensation under the Motor Vehicles Act and Consumer Protection Laws, 2018 (24th Edn.), Allahabad Law Agency
  3. Salmond and Heuston, Law of Torts , 2000 , Universal, Delhi

Reference Books:

  1. Ramaswamy Iyers,The Law of Torts, 2007 (10th), Lexis Nexis
  2. Ratanlal and Dhirajlal, The Law of Torts, 2016 (27th), Lexis Nexis
  3. V.H. Rogers, Winfield and Jolowicz, Tort, 2010 (18th Edn.), Sweet and Maxwell

Important Cases:

  1. C. Modagi v. Crosswell Tailor, (1991) II CPJ 586
  2. Ashby v. White, (1703) 92 ER 126
  3. Bhim Singh v. State of J K AIR 1986
  4. Bird v. Holbrook (1828)
  5. Bird v. Jones 1845 7 QB 74
  6. Cassidy v. Daily Mirror Newspapers Ltd. (1929) 2 KB 331
  7. Consumer Unity and Trust society v. State of Rajasthan (1991) II CPJ 56 Raj.
  8. Donoghue v. Stevenson (1932) SC 31
  9. Eastern and South African Telegraph Co. Ltd. v. Capetown Tramway Co. (1902)
  10. Gloucester Grammer School Masters Case, (1410) Y B 11 Hen IV 27
  11. Indian Medical Assn. v. V.P. Shantha (1995) 6 SCC 651
  12. Kasturi Lal v. State of U.P. AIR 1995 SC 1039
  13. Klaus Mittelbachert v. East India Hotels Ltd AIR (1997)
  14. Laxmi Engg. Works v. P.S.G. Industrial Institute, AIR (1995) SC 1428
  15. Laxmi Rajan v. Malar Hospital (1998) Mad. HC
  16. Lucknow Development Authority v. M.K.Gupta, (19494) ISCC 243.
  17. C. Mehta v. Union of India 1987 1 SCC 395
  18. Bohpal Gas Tragedy Case (1989)
  19. Morgan Stanley Mutual Fund v. Kartick Das (1994) 4SCC 225
  20. Nichols v. Marsland (1876)
  21. Poonam Verma v. Ashwin Patel (1996) 4SCC 332
  22. Rudul Sah v. State of Bihar
  23. Rylands v. Fletcher 1868 LR HL 330
  24. Spring Meadows Hospital v. Harjol Ahluwalia, AIR 1998 SC 1801
  25. Stanley v. Powell (1891)
  26. State of Rajasthan v. Mst. Vidyawati and Others AIR 1962 SC 1039
  27. Union Carbide Corporation v. Union of India AIR 1989 SC 248
  28. Woolbridge v. Sumner (1963)

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Courses Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PSO1 PSO2
LAW OF TORTS LWH101 CO1 3 2 3 3 2 3 1 2 2 2
CO2 3 1 2 3 1 3 1 2 3
CO3 3 2 2 3 2 1 2 3
CO4 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 3

 

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Law of Contract-I (LWH102)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of the paper is to familiarize students with the basic principles of Contract formation. The subject is very important for the students of Law as most of the economic transactions in the world are carried through contracts.
Course Outcomes (Cos) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Describe the general principles of the law of contract contained in equity, common law and statutory provisions Employability
CO2 Apply the general principles of contract to the commercial transactions Employability
CO3 Recognize the incidence of breach of contract and suggest the remedies available Employability
CO4 Communicate orally and in writing the matters of contract law, in and outside the courts Entrepreneurship/ skill development
Pre-requisites if any-  

 

SECTION A

Formation of Contract (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Meaning, Nature and Scope of Contract
  2. Offer/ Proposal
  3. Invitation to treat
  4. Acceptance
  5. Void, voidable, valid, illegal, unlawful agreements
  6. Standard form of contract
  7. Online contract

SECTION B

Consideration and Capacity (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Consideration
  2. Capacity to contract
  3. Minor’s contracts

SECTION C

Validity, Discharge and Performance of Contract (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Free Consent
  2. Coercion, Undue Influence, Misrepresentation, Fraud, Mistake
  3. Unlawful Consideration and Object
  4. Discharge of Contracts
  5. Performance, Impossibility of Performance and Frustration

SECTION D

Remedies and Quasi Contracts (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Breach of Contract
  2. Remedies for Breach of Contract
  3. Damages or compensation
  4. Specific performance
  5. Injunctions
  6. Rescission
  7. Quantum meruit.
  8. Quasi-contracts

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Contract Formation Exercise – Interest of Buyers in on-line shopping
  • Judgment Analysis
  • A Class-based Moot Court Competition in Contract Law

Text Books:

  1. Avtar Singh, Law of Contract and Specific Relief,2017 (12th), Eastern Book Company
  2. K.Bangia, Indian Contract Act, 2017 (6th Edn.), Allahabad Law Agency

Reference Books:

  1. Anson, Law of Contract, 2016 (30th ), Oxford University Press
  2. Cheshire and Fifoot, Law of Contract,2017 (11th), Lexis Nexis
  3. Pollock andMulla, The Indian Contract and Specific Relief Act, 2013 (14th), Lexis Nexis

Important Cases

  1. Balfour v. Balfour, (1919) 2 K.B. 571.
  2. Jones v. Padvatton (1969)All. E.R. 616
  3. Meritt v. Meritt(1970)2 All E.R. 760
  4. Lalman Shukla v. Gauri Dutt, II ALJ 489
  5. Harris v. Nickerson, (1875) LR SQB, 286.
  6. Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain v. Boots Cash Chemist (Southern) Ltd. (1953) 1QB 40.
  7. Harvey v. Facey, (1893) AC 552.
  8. Carlill v. Carbolic Smoke Ball Company, (1830) 1.Q.B 265.
  9. Felthouse v. Bindley (1862) 11, CB (NS) 869
  10. Harris v. Nickerson, (1875) LR SQB, 286.
  11. Powell v. Lee, (1908) 99 LT 284.
  12. Bhagwan Das Goverdhan Das Kedia v. Girdharilal and Co. AIR 1966 SC 543
  13. Dickinson v. Dodds 1876 Ch. D 463
  14. Durga Das Prasad v. Baldoe (1880)3 All. 221
  15. Chinnaya v. Ramaya (1882)4 Mad.137
  16. Tweedle v. Atkinson (1861) 1 b. ands. 393
  17. Dunlop pneumatic tyre Co., Plaintiff V. Selfridge and Co., Defendant, 1915 AC 847
  18. Khwaja Muhhamad Khan v. Husaini Begum I.L.R. (1910) 32 All. 410
  19. Klaus Mittelbachert v. East India Hotels Ltd. A.I.R. 1997 Delhi 201
  20. Kdar Nath v. Gauri Mahomed I.l.R. (1887) 14 Cal. 64
  21. Rajlucky Dabee v. Bhootnath Mukhrjee (1900) 4 C.W.N. 488
  22. Mohri Bibee v. Dharmodass Ghosh, (1903) 30 IA 114.
  23. Leslie v. Shiell (1914) 3 KB 607
  24. Khan Gul V. Lakha Singh A.I.R. 2004 P.and H 6
  25. Ajudhia Prasad v. Chandan lal A.I.R. 1937 All. 610
  26. Chikkkam Ammiraju v. Chikkam Seshamma AIR 1918 Mad 414
  27. Niko Devi v. Kirpa A.I.R. 1989 H.P.51
  28. Takri Devi v. Rama Dogra A.I.R. 1984 H.P.11
  29. Derry v. Peek, (1889) 14 AC 337.
  30. Central Inland Water Transport Corporation v. B.K Ganguly, AIR 1986 SC 1571
  31. Nordenfelt v. Maxim Nordenfelt Guns and Ammunition co Ltd (1893) AC 535.
  32. Gujarat Bottling Co. Ltd. v. Coca Cola Co. (1995) 5 SCC 54
  33. Satyabrata Ghose v. Mugneeram Bangur AIR 1954 SC 44
  34. Hadley v. Baxendale (1854)9 Exch 341
  35. Victoria Laundry (Windsor) Ltd v. Newman Industries Ltd (1949) 1 All ER 997.

 

  • CO-PO MAPPING
Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
LAW OF CONTRACT-I LWH102 CO1 3 2 1 2 2 1 2 1
CO2 3 2 2 2 1 2 1 2
CO3 3 2   2 2 2 2 2 2
CO4 3 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 2

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (LWH114)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P-O Structure (4-1-0)
Objective To enable students to develop an understanding of principles, functions and techniques of business management and develop requisite skills for work place management in business organizations.
 Course Outcomes (Cos) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Understand the basic principles and functions of management Employability
CO2 differentiate between management and leadership. Employability
CO3 analyze the relevance of staffing and organization structure in ensuring organizational effectiveness and
efficiency.
Employability
CO4 Develop awareness of the concept of motivation and leadership, and its relevance to organizational
success.
Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Process of Management (Lectures- 15)

  1. Concept, nature, process and significance of management
  2. Managerial levels, skills, functions and roles
  3. Management vs. Administration
  4. Leadership vs. Management
  5. Development of Management Thought: Classical, Neo-Classical, Behavioral, Systems and Contingency approaches

SECTION B

Planning and Organization (Lectures- 15)

  1. Planning Process, Types of Planning, MBO
  2. Concept, Types, Process and Techniques of Problem Solving and Decision-Making
  3. Organization Structure and Design: Principles of an Organisation; Span of Control; Departmentation; Types of an Organization; Authority-Responsibility; Delegation and Decentralization

SECTION C

Staffing, Motivation and leadership: Role and Procedure (Lectures- 15)

  1. Concept, Nature and Importance of Staffing
  2. Motivation: Nature and Importance of motivation, Types of Motivation, Theories of Motivation-Maslow,

Herzberg, X, Y and Z

  1. Leadership: Meaning and Importance, Traits of a leader, Leadership Styles; Production Centered and Employee centered leadership style

SECTION D

Controlling Practices (Lectures-15)

  1. Sovereignty: Nature and Scope of Control
  2. Types of Control
  3. Control Process
  4. Control Techniques
  5. Managing Conflicts
  6. Managing Diversity in Organizations
  7. Quality Circle
  8. Total Quality Management

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Activities on understanding self and skill analysis. Leadership skills assessment,
  • Management game on understanding roles and functions of a manager
  • Worksheets on HOTS related to types of business organizations
  • The planning exercise , Application of MBO in daily life
  • Corporate case studies for understanding structure and departmentation
  • Exercise on making your own team
  • Write up on business leaders from History
  • Exercise on the latest in Quality Management, Application of Control in day to day living using management techniques.
  • Case studies on Total Quality Management and Diversity Management

Text Books:

  1. C.B. Gupta, Management- Theory and Practice, Sultan Chand and Sons, New Delhi
  2. James A.F. Stoner, Principles of Management 2011, Pearson Education India, New Delhi
  3. F. Drucker, The Practice of Management,2011, Elsevier Ltd.
  4. V S P Rao, Management- Text and Cases, 2012, Excel Books, New Delhi

Reference Books:

  1. L. Massie, Essentials of Management, 2009 (4th Edn.), Prentice Hall India
  2. O Donnel Koontz and Weirich, Essentials of Management 2017, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi
  3. Gabriel, Management, 2003 (3rd Edn.), Pearson Education

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Principles of Management LWH114 CO1 2 3 1 1 3 2 1 1
CO2 3 3 1 1 3 3 1 1
CO3 3 3 1 1 3 3 1 1
CO4 2 3 1 1 3 3 1 1

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING-I (LWH115)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Objectives To acquaint the students with the basics of financial accounting. Students shall be taught basic financial concepts, learn about managing customer relationships, are imparted knowledge about delivery channels and equipped with effective communication skills.
Course Outcomes (Cos) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Understand and apply financial accounting concepts, principles and conventions for routine monetary
transaction.
Entrepreneurship
CO2 Prepare ledger accounts using double entry book-keeping and  record  journal entries accordingly. Entrepreneurship
CO3 Prepare financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Entrepreneurship
CO4 Discuss and describe the purpose of a company’s basic financial statements along with being able to
prepare the basic financial statements when presented with account balances.
Entrepreneurship
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction: Financial Accounting

  1. Definition and Scope
  2. Objectives of Financial Accounting,
  3. Accounting v/s Book Keeping,
  4. Terms used in Accounting,
  5. Users of Accounting Information,
  6. Limitations of Financial Accounting.
  7. Conceptual Framework: Accounting Concepts, Principles and Conventions
  8. Accounting Standards- concept, objectives, benefits;
  9. Brief review of Accounting Standards in India.

SECTION B

Recording of transactions

  1. Source Documents; Voucher System
  2. Accounting Process
  3. Journals
  4. Cash Book and other Subsidiary Books
  5. Ledgers
  6. Bank Reconciliation Statement
  7. Trial Balance Preparation
  8. Depreciation: Meaning, need and Importance,
  9. Methods of charging depreciation – ‘Written Down’ Method; ‘Straight-Line’ Method.

SECTION C

Preparation of final accounts (Lectures – 15)

  1. Preparation of Trading Account
  2. Profit and Loss Account and Balance Sheet;
  3. Introduction to Company Final Accounts:
  4. Important provisions of Companies Act, 2013 in respect of preparation of Final Accounts.

SECTION D

Preparation of final accounts of a Company and Computerized Accounting (Lectures – 15)

  1. Final Accounts of a Company,
  2. Computers and Financial application,
  3. Accounting Software packages

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Practical questions on various terms used in accounting, Accounting Principles, Accounting Concepts and Conventions.
  • Journal preparation, Subsidiary Books- Cash Book (Single Column, Double Column)and other Subsidiary Books and Bank Reconciliation Statements.
  • Questions to teach preparation of Ledgers, Trial Balance and SLM and written down value methods of Depreciation.
  • Preparation of Trading Account, Profit and Loss Account and Balance Sheet;
  • Questions on Company Accounts-Format, important provisions, preparation of Company Accounts. Computer and Financial application and Accounting Packages.

Text Books:

1.D. K. Goel, Financial Accounting, 2018 (2nd Edn.), Arya Publications, New Delhi

2.Maheshwari and Maheshwari, An Introduction to Accountancy, 2018, Vikas Publishing House

3.R.L. Gupta, Advanced Accounting, 2017, Sultan Chand and Sons

4.Shah, Basic Financial Accounting, 2013 (2nd Edn.), Oxford University Press

Reference Books:

  • Asish Bhattacharya, Financial Accounting for Business Managers, 2016 (5th), Prentice Hall of India
  • Y. Khan and P.K. Jain, Management Accounting, 2017, McGraw Hill Education
  • Larry M. Walther, Financial Accounting 2017, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Robert Anthony, David qqqHawkins, Kenneth A. Merchant, Accounting-Texts and Cases, 2017 (13th), McGraw Hill Education
  • N. Maheshwari, K. Maheshwari and C.A. Sharad, Advanced Accountancy,2017 (11th Edn.), Vikas Publishing
  • S. Grewal, S.C. Gupta and M.C. Shukla, Advanced Accounting Vol. I, 2016, S. Chand and Sons, New Delhi

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Financial Accounting-I LWH115 CO1 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 1 1
CO2 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 3 1
CO3 3 1 3 2 2 1 3 3 1
CO4 1 2 3 1 2 3 2 3 1

 

 

Course Title/ Code Introduction to Economics (LWH116)
Course Type: Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Objectives The objective of this paper is to provide broad understanding of basic concepts of Economics and understanding of relationships between Economics and Law.
Course Outcomes (Cos) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Identify the basic characteristics of a rational individual decision maker. Entrepreneurship
CO2 Explain the idea of the law of demand and supply and offer advice on the elasticity of demand and supply. Entrepreneurship
CO3 Outline the characteristics of idea of firm structure, organizational behavior and nature of Market Entrepreneurship
CO4 Establish the link between idea of welfare, externalities, public goods and common resources. Entrepreneurship
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Economics (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Meaning, Definition and Scope of Economics- Concept, definition, methodology and Scope of Micro Economics.
  2. Concepts in Microeconomics and Forms of economic analysis – Micro vs. macro, partial vs. general, static vs. dynamic, positive vs. normative, short run vs. long run, concept of margin.
  3. Wants and Scarcity: The Pervasive Economic Problem, Functions of an economic system, Opportunity Cost; Production Possibility Frontier.
  4. Economic organization– market, command and mixed economy.
  5. Economics and Law- Relation between economics and law- economic offences and economic legislation.

SECTION B

Theory of Consumer Behavior and Demand (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Determination of Consumers Equilibrium using cardinal approach: Concept of utility, law of DMU, Consumer equilibrium in case of single commodity (law of marginal utility) and multiple commodities (law of Equi-Marginal Utility).
  2. Meaning of Demand: Demand function, determinants of demand, law of demand, and change in demand versus change in quantity demanded, Derivation of demand curve: Individual and Market demand curve, Law of demand, shape of demand curve, Elasticity of Demand: Price elasticity, Cross elasticity and Income elasticity; Factor affecting elasticity of demand, its practical application and importance.
  3. Determination of Consumers Equilibrium using ordinal approach: Indifference curve analysis, Marginal Rate of Substitution, Budget Line, Determination of Income effect, Substitution effect and Price Effect using indifference curve, The Theory of Revealed Preference.

SECTION C

Production Analysis, Cost and Revenue Concepts and Supply (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Production: Production function, Concept of Total Physical Product, Average Physical Product and Marginal Physical Product. Law of Production: Law of Diminishing Returns, Law of Variable Proportions and Returns to Scale. Iso-quant and Iso-cost lines, Economies and Diseconomies of Large scale production- internal and external.
  2. Various concepts of costs and revenue- Fixed Costs, Variable Costs, Average, Cost, Marginal Cost, Real Cost, Explicit and Implicit Costs, Book Costs and Opportunity Costs, Cost Curves in the short run and long run, Determinants of Costs- Output Level, Price of Factors of Production, Productivity of FOP, Technology. Revenue- Total, Average and Marginal.
  3. Supply: Law of supply, determinants of supply, shifts of supply versus movements along a supply curve, elasticity of supply.

SECTION D

Markets Theory, Theory of determination of factor prices and Application (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Meaning and Classification of Markets: Pure and Perfect Competitions, Perfect and Imperfect Competition-Monopolistic Competition, Monopoly, Duopoly and Oligopoly, Cartels.
  2. Pricing under different Market Structures- Perfect Competition, Monopoly and Monopolistic Competition, Oligopoly- Kinked Demand Curve, Collusion, Cartels.
  3. Labor supply and wage determination, Role of trade unions and collective bargaining in wage determination; minimum wage legislation, Exploitation of labor, The theory of rent, interest and profits.
  4. Concept of Dumping- to be substantiated with the cases of International Courts of Justice, Competition law.

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Interrelation between Micro and Macro Economics and Economics and Law.
  • Numerical on PPC, utility, demand, elasticity, cost, production, supply and markets.
  • Applications of demand – Exercises to be given to the students to identify the demand and supply of various organizations/ Usefulness of the concept of Elasticity through Case Study methods.
  • Application of supply and different market structures: Identification of different cases of floors, ceilings, taxes implemented by the Government through legislation, identifying different market structures across industries in India.
  • Analysis of various laws and policies related to consumer, producer, markets and trade.
  • Symposium- Market structures, Competition Law, Competition Commission of India (CCI); Role play/Presentations on role of Trade Unions, Collective bargaining/ Dumping.

Text Books:

  1. N. Dwivedi, Principles of Economics, 2016, Vikas Publishing House, New Delhi
  2. Dominick Salvatore, Principles of Microeconomics, 2014, Oxford University Press, New Delhi
  3. K. Dewett and J.D. Verma, Elementary Economic Theory, 2006, S. Chand Publications
  4. K. Dewettand M.H. Navalur Modern Economic Theory, 2006, S. Chand Publications
  5. Glenn Hubbard andAnthony Patrick O. Brien, Microeconomics, 2016, Pearson
  6. Robert S. Pindyckand Daniel L. Rubinfeld, Microeconomics, 2017 (8th), Pearson

Reference Books:

  1. D. Chaturvedi, Macro Economic Theory, 2012, International Book House, New Delhi
  2. J. Chang, Economics: A User’s Guide, 2014, Pelican
  3. Joseph E. Stiglitz and Carl E. Walsh, Economics, 2011, W.W. Norton and Company, New York
  4. Karl E. Case and Ray C. Fair, Principles of Economics, 2013 (11th ), Pearson Education
  5. Gregory Mankiw, Macroeconomics,2010, (7th Edn.), Worth Publishers
  6. Dasgupta, Economics: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press
  7. A. Samuelson, Economics, 2005, Mc-Graw-Hill/Irwin
  8. Uma Kapila, Indian Economy Performance and Policies, 2019 (18th), Academic Foundation

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Code PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Introduction to Economics LWH116 CO1 1 3 2 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 3 3
CO2 1 2 2 1 2 3 2 1 2 2 3 3
CO3 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 3
CO4 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Legal English-I (LWH106)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The course aims to improve students’ English Language skills within legal context. It focuses on reading, listening, speaking and writing skills which will help students apply different techniques for comprehending authentic, academic legal texts and will be able to apply the acquired skills to understand and interpret a concept, participate in class discussions, and give oral presentations on legal topics etc. Students will be taught basics of grammar to improve their written and oral communication so that they may be able to speak and write English flawlessly and accurately.

 

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 Read and write Legal lanugage in English including legal maxims, legal abbreviations and their usages. Skill enhancement
CO2 Read and explain legal texts, cases and legislations Skill enhancement
CO3 Interpret and apply a concept to synthesize and form opinions and arguments on any topic and Communicate effectively in oral discussions, debates, extempore and client counselling etc. Skill enhancement
CO4 write abstract, synopsis, legal essays, legal notices and short articles Skill enhancement
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Law, Language, Literature (Contact hours -15)

  1. Importance of English language in Law
  2. Common legal terms and maxims (list of 20), Common legal abbreviations (list of 30)
  3. Selected portions from “My Experiments with Truth”, extracts from “The Merchant of Venice”
  4. Common errors (usage of prepositions, conjunctions, determiners, verbs, subject verb agreements, modals
  5. Literary Device- simile, metaphor, personification, repetition, pun, alliteration etc.

 

SECTION B

 

Comprehension, Communication and Social Skills (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Reading comprehension of legal texts- The Benefit of Doubt by Jack London, Ramesh v. Union of India, Before the Law by Franz Kafka, Mediation key to swift justice, by Suman K Shrivastava
  2. Critical Listening (audio clippings, famous speeches, lectures, rhetorics)
  3. Interviewing, Client Counseling, Debating, Extempore, Quizzing etc.
  4. Reading judgments, orders, court findings, project preparing and presentations

SECTION C

Legal Writing and Professional Correspondence (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Legal Analysis- Predictive and Persuasive
  2. Legal Drafting-legal notices, e-mails, legal essays
  3. Reports, applications, slogan writing, Note makings etc.
  4. Simple affidavits and indemnity bonds

SECTION D

Language Research and Development (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Understanding basics of Research
  2. Writing brochures and leaflets
  3. Abstract and Synopsis writing
  4. Developing Research and writing a Research Paper

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Literary readings and discussion on following-
  • Films – Few Good Men; Twelve Angry Men; I am Sam; My cousin Winnie; Parzania
  • John Gibbons, Language and the Law, 1999, Pearson
  • William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (Act IV, the Court scene)
  • C K Kakodar v. State of Maharashtra (1970) (J. Jaganmohan Reddy)
  • Francis Bacon, “Of Judicature”, (1612)
  • The Bajaj Dispute and Mediation by Sriram Panchu

Text Books:

  1. Anirudh Prasad, Outlines of Legal Language in India, 2016, Central Law Publications
  2. M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing, Eastern Book Company
  3. S R Myneni, English – I, 2017, Allahabad Law Agency
  4. William R. Mckay et. al., Legal English, 2005, Pearson Education UK, [e-book]

Reference Books:

  1. Akmajian Demers, Farmer and Harmish, Lingustics:An Introduction to Language and Communication, 2006 (6th), MIT Press
  2. K. Bansal and J. B. Harrison, Spoken English for India: A Manual of Speech and Phonetics, 2013 (4th Edn.), Orient Longman
  3. Geoffrey Leecha and Jan Svartvik, A Communicative grammar of English, 2003 (3rd), Longman, Delhi
  4. George Yule, The study of Language, 2017 (6th), Cambridge University Press
  5. Glanville William, Learning the Law, 2010 (14th), Sweet and Maxwell
  6. S. Singh and Nishi Behl, Legal Language, Writing and General English, 2009, Allahabad Law Agency
  7. Lewis Hedwig, Body Language, 2000 (2nd), Sage Publications
  8. Osborn and Osborn, Public Speaking, 2017 (11th), Pearson
  9. Prof Peter M. Tiersma, “What is Language and Law? And does anyone care?” (Legal Studies Paper No. 2009-11) March, 2009
  10. Varinder Kumar, Raj Bodh, et.al., Business Communication, 2010, Oscar Publication
  11. S. Hornby, Guide to Patterns and Usage in English, 1999, Oxford University Press
  12. Kitty O. Locker, Business and Administrative Communication, 2014 (11thEdn.), McGraw Hill

 

CO PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 Po10 PS01 PS02
LEGAL ENGLISH-I LWH106 CO1 2 3 2 3 2 1 1 1 1
CO2 3 2 3 3 2 3 1 1 1 1
CO3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1
CO4 2 3 3 2 1 2 2 1  

 

 

SEMESTER- II

 

Course Code

Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
Deptt/Allied Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH107 Legal Methods LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH108 Law of Contract-II LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH117 Human Resource Management Core 4 1 0 5 4
LWH218 Financial Accounting-II Core 4 1 0 5 4
LWH119 Business and Growth Economics Core 4 1 0 5 4
LWH112 Legal English-II LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWN113 Departmental Seminar-I LAW Core     0 1
Total (L/T/P)/ CREDITS)       25

 

 

 

 

 

DETAILED SYLLABUS

Course Title/ Code Legal Methods (LWH107)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of this paper is to orient students to legal studies. The paper focuses on nature of law and legal system.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Describe the nature and purpose of law and major legal systems Employability
CO2 Differentiate various sources of law, to apply them to the legal matters at hand Employability
CO3 Apply the principles of interpretation of statutes to the effective legal drafting Employability
CO4 Apply the tools of legal research in academic as well as professional communication with the client, courts and other authorities Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Law and Legal Concepts (Lectures- 15)

  1. Definition, Nature, Purpose of Law
  2. Schools of law – Analytical, Natural Law, Historical, Sociological and Realism
  3. Classification of Law
  4. Law and Logic
  5. Law and Moral
  6. Legal Concepts -Legal Rights and Duties

SECTION B

Sources of Law and Legal Methods (Lectures- 15)

  1. Socio Legal Method- Custom
  2. Judicial Methods – Precedent
  3. Legislative Methods – Legislation
  4. Interpretation of Statutes

SECTION C

Basic Concepts of Legal System (Lectures- 15)

  1. Historical classification of Legal Systems – Common Law and Civil Law Systems
  2. Indian Legal System
  3. Constitution as Grund Norm, Rule of Law, Separation of Powers
  4. Judicial System – Court System; Investigating and Enforcement Agencies

SECTION D

Legal Research and Legal Writing (Lectures- 15)

  1. Research Methodology in Law: Meaning, Importance, Objectives, Types, Elements
  2. Legal Writing – Case Notes; Statutes; Reports and Journals and Citations

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Statutes and Judgments Analysis
  • Preparation of one Research paper
  • Session on Access to Legal Resources: Library and Online Data Base
  • Debate/Group Discussion on various Legal Systems
  • Practice sessions to improve Writing Skills

Text Books:

  1. C. Dernbach, R.V Singleton, et.al., A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method, 2013, Aspen Publishers
  2. K. Verma and M. Afzal Wani (ed.), Legal Research and Methodology, 2001 (2nd Edn.), ILI, Delhi
  3. N. Mani Tripathi, Jurisprudence (Legal Theory),2017, Allahabad Law Agency
  4. D. Mahajan, Jurisprudence and Legal Theory, 2016, Eastern Book Company
  5. R. Myneni, Legal Research Methodology, 2015, Allahabad Law Agency

Reference Books:

  1. G.P. Tripathi, Legal Method, 2014, Central Law Publications
  2. N.V. Pranjape, Jurisprudence and Legal Theory, 2016, Central Law Agency
  3. D. Basu, Introduction to the Constitution of India, 2018 (23rd Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  4. Benjamin N. Cardozo, The Nature of Judicial Process, 2005, Dover Publications
  5. Joseph Minattur, Indian Legal System, 2009 (2nd Revised Edn.), ILI, Delhi
  6. T. H. Smith, Glanville Willaim’s Learning the Law, 2013 (15th Edn.), Sweet and Maxwell
  7. James A Holland, Julian S. Webb, Learning Legal Rules (A students’ guide to legal method and reasoning), 2016, Oxford University Press.
  • CO-PO Mapping
Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
LEGAL METHODS LWH107 CO1 2 2 2 3 3 2 1 2 2 2
CO2 2 1 2 3 3 3 1 2 3 3
CO3 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 2 2 3
CO4 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Law of Contract-II (LWH108)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of the paper is to familiarize students with various special contract, law of agency and specific reliefs.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Explain the principles and rationale of specific contracts in day-to-day commercial activities Employability
CO2 Draft the specific contracts specifying the appropriate rights and duties of parties Skill enhancement
CO3 Recognize the incidence of breach of specific contracts in a given situation Entrepreneurship
CO4 Advise and represent the parties to claim reliefs available in Law Employability
Prequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Special Contracts (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Indemnity Guarantee:Indemnity and Guarantee: Meaning, Distinction between Indemnity and Guarantee. Right / Duties of Indemnifier, Indemnified and Surety.Discharge of Surety. Kinds of Guarantee.
  2. Bailment and Pledge:Meaning and Distinction between bailment and pledge, Rights and Duties of Bailor /Bailee, Pawnor /Pawnee, Lien, Termination of Bailment. Definitions of Agent and Principal. Essentials of relationship of agency. Creation of agency: by agreement, ratification and law. Relation of principal / agent, subagent and substituted agent, Termination of agency.
  3. Agency:Definitions of Agent and Principal. Essentials of relationship of agency. Creation of agency: by agreement, ratification and law. Relation of principal / agent, subagent and substituted agent, Termination of agency.

SECTION B

Specific Relief Act, 1963 (Contact hours- 15)

Recovery of property, Specific performance of contracts, Rectification and Cancellation of Instruments; Rescission of Contract, Declaratory decree, Injunctions – Temporary and Perpetual and mandatory

 

SECTION C

Sale of Goods Act, 1930 (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Definitions, Conditions and Warranties

SECTION D

Sale of Goods (Contact Hours 15)

  1. Transfer of Property
  2. Transfer of Property (Nemo dat quod non habet)
  3. Performance of Contract
  4. Rights of unpaid seller

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Practical Problems
  • Judgment Analysis
  • A Class-based Moot Court Competition in Contract Law

Text Books:

  1. Avtar Singh, Law of Contract and Specific Relief, 2017(12th Edn.), Eastern Book Company
  2. R. K. Bangia, Indian Contract Act, 2019 (16th Edn.), Allahabad Law Agency

Reference Books:

  1. Anson, Law of Contract , 2016 (30th Edn.), Oxford University Press
  2. Cheshire and Fifoot, Law of Contract, 2017 (11thEdn.), Lexis Nexis
  3. Pollock and Mulla, The Indian Contract and Specific Relief Act, 2013 (14th Edn.), Lexis Nexis

CO-PO Mapping

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
LAW OF CONTRACT-II LWH108 CO1 3 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1
CO2 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2
CO3 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2
CO4 3 3 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 2 2

 

 

Course Title/Code HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (LWH117)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P-Structure (4-1-0)
Objectives The programme focuses on the active involvement of the students in the learning process and the effective application of Human Resource Management Theory.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Develop an understanding of the concepts and the theoretical frameworks of human resource
management.
Entrepreneurship
CO2 Develop necessary skill set for application of various HR issues. Entrepreneurship
CO3 Analyse key HRM issues and apply clear understanding of the various HRM sub-systems in work
situations
Entrepreneurship
CO4 Integrate the knowledge of HRM concepts to take correct business decisions. Entrepreneurship
Pre- requisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Lecture- 15)

  1. Concept, Nature, Scope, Objectives and Importance of HRM
  2. Evolution of HRM
  3. HRM Process, Functions of HRM
  4. Challenges of HRM
  5. Personnel Management vs HRM
  6. Traditional HRM vs Strategic HRM
  7. Labour/Employment laws for HR in India-An Introduction

SECTION B

Human Resource Planning (Contact Hours 15)

  1. Job Analysis: Job Description and Job Specification
  2. Job Design, Job Simplification, Job Rotation, Job Enlargement, Job Enrichment
  3. Recruitment: Sources and Process
  4. Selection Process: Tests and Interviews
  5. Placement and Induction
  6. Job Changes: Transfers, Promotions/Demotions, Separations

SECTION C

Training and Development (Contact Hours 15)

  1. Concept and Importance of Training
  • Types of Training
  • Methods of Training
  • Design of Training Programme
  • Evaluation of Training Effectiveness
  • Executive Development: Process and Techniques
  • Career Planning and Development
  1. Performance and Potential Appraisal:
  • Concept and Objectives
  • Methods and techniques of Performance Appraisal
  • limitations of performance appraisal methods
  • Introduction to Performance Management
  • 360 degree Appraisal
  • MBO

SECTION D

Compensation and Maintenance (Contact Hours 15)

  1. Compensation:
  • Job Evaluation: Concept, Process and Significance;
  • Components of Employee Remuneration: Base and Supplementary
  1. Maintenance:
    • Overview of Employee Welfare,
    • Health and Safety, Social Security,
    • Grievance Redressal Procedure,
    • Modern compensation techniques-Flexitime, ESOPs

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Case Studies
  • Practical Problems
  • Worksheets and group activities
  • Role Plays,
  • Exercises related to Compensation Design, Job Evaluation and Employee Welfare

Text Books:

  1. B. Gupta, Human Resource Management Text and Cases, 2017, Sultan Chand and Sons
  2. S.P. Rao, Human Resource Management: Text and Cases,2010, Excel Books

Reference Books:

  1. G. Dessler. Human Resource Management, 2017 (4th Edn.), Pearson Education
  2. D. Lepak, and M. Gowan, Human Resource Management 2016, (3rd Edn.), Chicago Business Press
  • CO-PO MAPPING
Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT LWH117 CO1 2 1 3 1 1 3 2 1 1
CO2 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 1
CO3 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 1
CO4 2 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 1

 

 

Course Title/ Code FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING-II (LWH218)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Objective In FA I, students have studies about the basic principles of accounting, which is to learn how to record the events and transactions. This also included preparation of account books such as ledgers and subsidiary books. FA II purports to train students for preparation of registers for specific areas such as consignment accounts, joint venture accounts, branch accounts and for organizations, including trading and non-trading institutions and partnership etc.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Know the financial position of each branch of an organization and provide concrete suggestions for the
improvement in the working of different branches.
Entrepreneurship
CO2 Understand the methods of recording joint venture transactions. Entrepreneurship
CO3 Understand the accounting treatment of consignment in the books of consignor and consignee. Entrepreneurship
CO4 Prepare necessary accounts in the ledger of hire-purchaser and hire vendor and solve the accounting
problems of hire- purchase system.
Entrepreneurship
CO5 Enable the students to understand partnership account from admission to dissolution.

 

Entrepreneurship
Pre- requisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Sectional Balancing System

  1. Self- balancing system including rectification errors

SECTION B

Non – Trading Institutions

  1. Accounts of Non-trading Institutions

 

 

SECTION C

Special Accounting Areas

  1. Consignment Accounts: Important terms; Accounting records; Valuation of unsold stock; Conversion of consignment into branch
  2. Joint Venture Accounts: Meaning of joint venture; Joint venture and partnership; Accounting records
  3. Branch Accounts: Dependent branch; Debtors system, stock and debtor system; Final accounts system;

Wholesale branch; Independent branch; Foreign Branch

  1. Hire-purchase and installment purchase system: Meaning of Hire-purchase contract; Legal provisions regarding hire-purchase contract; Accounting records for goods of substantial sale values; Accounting records for goods of small values; Installment purchase system; After sales service.

SECTION D

Partnership Accounts

  1. Essential characteristics of partnership; Partnership Deed; Final Accounts; Adjustment after closing the accounts; Fixed and fluctuating capital; Goodwill; Joint Life Policy; Change in Profit Sharing Ratio
  2. Reconstitution of a partnership firm- Admission of a partner, Retirement of a partner’ Death of a partner;

Amalgamation of partnership firms; Dissolution of a partnership firm;- Modes of dissolution of a firm; Accounting entries; Insolvency of Partners; Sale of a firm to a company; Gradual realisation of assets and piecemeal distribution

Text Books:

  1. N. Anthony and J.S. Reece, Accounting Principle, Richard Irwin Inc.
  2. L. Gupta and M Radhaswamy, Financial Accounting, 2017, Sultan Chand and Sons, New Delhi
  3. R. Monga, Girish Ahuja and Ashok Sehgal, Financial Accounting, Mayur Paper Back Noida
  4. C. Shukla, T S Grewal, S C Gupta, Advanced Accounts, S. Chand and Co. New Delhi
  5. Compendium of Statement and Standards of Accounting: The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, New Delhi

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Financial Accounting-II LWH218 CO1 2 3 1 2 1 2 3
CO2 2 3 2 1 3 3 2
CO3 2 2 2 2
CO4 3 2   2 2 3 3 2
    CO5 2 2 1 1 2 2 1

 

 

Course Title/ Code BUSINESS AND GROWTH ECONOMICS (LWH119)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Objectives The objective of the paper is to familiarize students with the basic principles of contract formation. The subject is very important for the students of Law as most of the economic transactions in the world are carried through contracts.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Understand the basic principles of macro-economics. Employability
CO2 Identify the underlying ideas of concepts like GDP, National Income, etc. Employability
CO3 Demonstrate a clear understanding of inflation, deflation, unemployment and their inter-relationship. Employability
CO4 Analyse key issues in fiscal management and its impact on growth and development. Employability
Pre- requisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Economic Growth

a)Meaning of Economic Growth and factors of Economic Growth

b)Theories of Economic Growth :

  • Harrod-Domar Model
  • Neo- Classical Model(Solow’s Growth Model)
  • Endogenous Model

SECTION B

Business cycle and Global Recession (Lectures- 15)

  1. Business Cycles and its phases, policy measures to control business cycle (Fiscal and Monetary)
  2. Case Study: Global Recession of 2009

 

SECTION C

Dynamics of Inflation and Unemployment (Lectures- 15)

  1. Modern Theories of Inflation; Cost-push and Demand-pull, Measures to Control Inflation, Monetary and Fiscal Policies for controlling inflation.
  2. Unemployment, methods of unemployment, kinds of unemployment, inflation and unemployment-Phillips curve.

SECTION D

Foreign Exchange (Lectures- 15)

  1. Foreign Exchange Market: Meaning, kinds of Foreign exchange market and nature of Foreign exchange transactions.
  2. Exchange rate: its meaning, determination and market theory of exchange rate determination.
  3. Reasons for change in equilibrium exchange rate, PPP theory.

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Policy Dilemma: What is Desirable- Inflation or Unemployment?
  • Business Cycle and its phases and case Studies on Business Cycle.
  • Discuss and present the Global Recession of 2008-2009: recent case study of business cycle
  • Monetary and Fiscal Policies (their working, latest trends and issues)
  • Any other activity suggested by teaching faculty while transacting curriculum.

Text Books:

  1. N. Dwivedi, Macro-Economics, 2018 (5th Edn.), Tata McGraw Hill
  2. Robert D. Cooter and Thomas Ulen,Law and Economics,2016, Pearson
  3. R. Myneni,Indian Economics For Law Students, 2017, Allahabad Law Agency
  4. Uma Kapila,Indian Economy since Independence, 2019, Academic Foundation

Reference Books:

  1. Andrew B. Abel and Ben S. Bernanke, Macroeconomics, 2011 (7th), Pearson Education, Inc.
  2. Dornbusch, Fischer and Startz, Macroeconomics, 2018 (12th), McGraw Hill
  3. Errol D’Souza, Macroeconomics, 2012, Pearson Education
  4. Joseph E. Stiglitz and Carl E. Walsh, Economics, 2007 (International Student Edition, 4th Edn) W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., New York
  5. Karl E. Case and Ray C. Fair, Principles of Economics, Pearson Education, Inc.
  6. Gregory Mankiw, Economics: Principles and Applications, 2008, Cengage Learning India Private Limited)
  7. Gregory Mankiw. Macroeconomics, 2018 (10th Edn.), Worth Publishers
  8. Olivier Blanchard, Macroeconomics, 2017 (6th), Pearson Education, Inc.
  9. Paul R. Krugman, Maurice Obstfeld and Marc Melitz, International Economics, 2012, Pearson Education Asia
  10. Richard T. Froyen, Macroeconomics, 2012 (10th), Pearson Education

 

  • CO-PO MAPPING
Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
BUSINESS AND GROWTH ECONOMICS LWH119 CO1 3 2 2 3 2 1 1 3 3
CO2 2 2 1 2 3 2 2 3 3
CO3 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 3
CO4 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Legal English-II (LWH112)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-0-1)
Credits 4
Course Objective The course focuses on the Language of the Law: words, legal terms, maxims, expressions and grammar, systematically blended with relevant modules that cover literature, language and legal communication(both oral and written).Students will be taught the essential nuances of Legal English which are extremely critical for their professional life.

 

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 To Differentiate between legal language and general language. Skill development
CO2 To Use legal language and logic in class discussions and oral presentations Skill development
CO3 To Write legal notices, affidavits, indemnity bonds, written statements. Skill development
CO4 To Undertake legal research and write research articles, case comments, book chapters. Skill development
Pre- requisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Legal Language (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Legal Maxims: origin of maxims
  2. Meaning of maxims (list of maxims will be provided)
  3. Usage of maxims in sentences to bring out clarity of meaning
  4. Legal terms and phrases: purpose, meanings of legal terms and phrases (list to be provided)
  5. Common Abbreviations related to Law (list to be provided)

SECTION B

Literature and Law (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Arms and the Manby George Bernard Shaw
  2. The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare
  3. The Trial of Bhagat Singh: Politics of Justice by A.G.Noorani
  4. The Ten Judgments That Changed India by Zia Mody

SECTION C

Comprehensionand Interpretation (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Reading Comprehension(Legal Texts)-skills of reading and understanding passages
  2. Speaking-Pronunciation, intonation, rhythm, modulation, pitch, tone and body language
  3. Critical listening
  4. Extensive reading practices of judgments, court findings, orders and correct usage of vocabulary
  5. Legal Counseling, Interviewing, Questionnaire, Group Discussion, Talk Show

SECTION D

Enriching General English and Legal Writing (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Correct usage of parts of speech, tenses, basic grammatical patterns and vocabulary, common errors
  2. Brief idea about pleading and drafting, meaning and problems of drafting
  3. Features of Effective Drafting, Drafting Legal Notice, Petitions, Applications, rejoinders
  4. Formal and Informal letters, Essay writing, Legal Reports, Project Reports, Abstracts

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Analysis of Legal perspective of the play/story
  • Open Book Quiz
  • Role Play-different characters
  • Regular assignments on reading relevant portions of land mark judgments
  • Discussions on legal dimensions of newly released movies/serials
  • Mock Interviews, group discussions

Text Books

  1. J.S.Singh and Nishi Behl, Legal Language, Writing and General English, 2009, Allahabad Law Agency
  2. N.R. Madhav Menon, Clinical Legal Education, 2011, Eastern Book Company

Reference Books

  1. Mark E Wojcik, Introduction to Legal English, International Law Institute
  2. S.R.A. Rosedar, Legal Language and Legal Writing, 2016, Lexis Nexis
  3. Rupert Haigh, Legal English, 2018, Taylor and Francis Ltd.
  4. Wren and Martin, High School English Grammar and Composition, S. Chand
  5. Lord Alfred Denning, Due Process of Law, 1980, Oxford University Press

CO-PO Mapping

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
LEGAL ENGLISH-II LWH112 CO1 2 3 2 3 2 1 1 1 1
CO2 3 2 3 3 2 1 1 1 1
CO3 3 1 2 2 3 2 1 2 1 1
CO4 2 3 1 3 2 3 1 2 1 2

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Departmental Seminar-I (LWN113)
Course Type: Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (0-0-0)
Credits 1
Course Objective The objective of this course is to make students hone their knowledge and practical skill of critical thinking and presentation.

 

INTRODUCTION

Faculty of Law is holding Departmental Seminar for the law students. It is mandatory for all the students to participate in teams of two members each. This is an exclusive initiative of the Faculty of Law and is made University mandatory course to be complete by each students, which carries 1 credit. This exercise has been made part of the course curriculum, which shall help students develop their critical and analytical thinking and writing and presentation skills.

THEME – LAW, GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

Indicative topics are

  1. Law and Privacy
  2. Law relating to Freedom of speech and Expression
  3. Media trial – reporting of cases
  4. Regulation of Media
  5. Right to Religion
  6. Affirmative Action – Reservation in employment and educational institutions
  7. Right to Education
  8. Right to health care
  9. UID Act and Governmental Powers
  10. Financial Powers of Government – GST
  11. Homosexuality
  12. Corruption
  13. Triple Talak
  14. Ban on Smoking

Rules

  1. Compulsory activity for the law students.
  2. Teams of 2 students will be registered. It is mandatory for both the team members to speak. Marks shall be given to the students individually.
  3. Activity is for 1 credit i.e. 50 marks.
  4. Written submission shall be for 25 marks and presentation for 25 marks.
  5. Plagiarism is strictly prohibited

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR-I LWN113 CO1 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 3
CO2 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 3
CO3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 3

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER III
Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type Structure Credits
      Deptt./Allied/Core/Elective/Audit L T P  
LWH201 Constitutional Law-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH202 Family Law-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH203 Law of Crimes-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH215 Marketing Management Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH216 Business Mathematics Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH217 Financial Management Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWO207 Internship Viva-I Law Core 0 0 0 1

 

 

 

 

DETAILED SYLLABUS

 

Course Title/ Code Constitutional Law-I (LWH201)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of this paper is to introduce students to the concept of Constitution and Constitutionalism. . The goal is to strengthen their basic understanding of the following concepts under constitutional law – Rule of Law, Fundamental Rights, Directive Principles of State Policy and Fundamental Duties. The paper will also strengthen student’s understanding about fundamentals of constitutional law so that they develop a deeper understanding of social issues viz-a-viz institutional and legal framework in India.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment/Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 To Know about the basic principles of the Constitution of India and their application on the dynamics of constitutionality of laws and state actions; Employability
CO2 To Identify various fundamental rights, freedoms and privileges granted under the Constitution of India and offer advocacy in case of their violation Employability
CO3 To Explain the significance of Directive principles of the State policy and fundamental duties in promotion of social order; Employability
CO4 To Represent the client in the Supreme Court and High Courts in the matters involving violation of fundamental rights Employability
Pre- requisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Class Hours 15)

  1. Nature and Features of Indian Constitution
  2. Basic elements of Constitution
  3. Rule of law
  4. Separation of powers
  5. Federal Structure
  6. Citizenship – Article 5-11
  7. Citizenship at the commencement
  8. Right of citizenship of Migrants
  9. Right of citizenship of person of Indian origin
  10. State – Article 12
  11. Constitutionality of Laws- Article 13
    1. Doctrine of Eclipse
    2. Doctrine of Waiver
    3. Doctrine of Severability
    4. Presumption of Constitutionality
  12. Right to Equality- Article 14-18
  13. Equality before laws and Equal protection of laws
  14. Prohibition of discrimination and Justice to weaker sections of society-SC/ST/WOMEN
  15. Equality of opportunity in matters of public employment
  16. Abolition of Untouchability and Titles

SECTION B

Right to Life and Fundamental Freedom (Class Hours 15)

  1. Right to Fundamental Freedom- Article 19
  2. Freedom of speech and expression
  3. Freedom of Press
  4. Freedom of Assembly and Association
  5. Freedom of movement
  6. Freedom to reside and settle
  7. Right to Trade and Occupation
  8. Fundamental Protections – Article 20-22
  9. Protection in respect for conviction for offences
  10. Protection of life and liberty
  11. Protection against arrest and detention
  12. Right against Exploitation – Article 23-24
  13. Human Trafficking and forced labor
  14. Child labor
  15. Right to Education – Article 21 A

SECTION C

Right to Religion, Cultural and Educational Rights and Constitutional Protection of these Rights (Class Hours 15)

  1. Right to Freedom of Religion – Article 25-28
  2. Freedom to profess or Practice Religion
  3. Freedom to Manage religious affairs
  4. Religious Endowments- Doctrine of Cypress
  5. Restrictions on religious instruction
  6. Cultural and Educational Rights – Article 29-30
  7. Protection of Interest of Minorities
  8. Right of Minorities to establish and administer educational institution
  9. Right to Constitutional Remedies – Article 32
  10. Article 32
  11. Writ Jurisdiction
  12. Inter-relationship between Articles 32 and 226

SECTION D

Directive Principles and Fundamental Duties (Class Hours 15)

  1. Directive Principles of State Policy- Article 36-51
  2. Nature
  3. Instruments of Social order and welfare
  4. Fundamental Rights and Directive Principles- Interrelationship and Judicial Balancing
  5. Fundamental Duties – Article 51A

Tutorial activities 1 Hour /Week

  1. Case Analysis
  2. Group discussions
  3. Research paper
  4. Awareness about Fundamental Rights and Duties of Citizens
  5. Visit to Supreme Court of India/NHRC

Text Books:

  1. P.JAIN, Indian Constitutional Law, Lexis Nexis, 8th Edition, 2018
  2. N.SHUKLA, Constitution of India, Eastern Book Company, 13th Edition , 2017

Reference Books:

  1. D. Basu, Commentary on the Indian Constitution of India, Lexis Nexis, 10th Edition, 2017
  2. Glanville Austin, Indian Constitution-Cornerstone of the Nations, Oxford University Press, 1999
  3. M. Seervai, Constitutional Law of India, Universal Law Publishing Co., 4thEdition, 2015.
  4. N.Pandey, Constitutional Law of India, Central Law Agency, 54th Edition, 2017
  5. Narender Kumar, Constitutional Law of India, Allahabad Law Agency, 9th Edition, 2016
  6. M. Bakshi, The Constitution of India, Lexis Nexis, 16nth Edition, 2019

Case Laws

  1. K. Gopalan v. State of Madras, AIR 1950 SC 27
  2. ADM Jabalpur v. Shivkant Shukla, 1976
  3. Air India v. Nargesh Meerza, AIR 1981 SC 1829
  4. Ajay Hasia v. Khalid Mujib, AIR 1981 SC 487
  5. Bandhua Mukti Morcha v. Union of India and Ors. (1997) 10 SCC 549
  6. Bhikaji Narain v. State of Madhya Pradesh, AIR 1955 SC 781
  7. S.Nakara v. Union of India, AIR 1983 SC 130
  8. Deep Chand v. State of U.P. AIR 1959 SC 648
  9. P. Royappa v. State of Tamil Nadu,(1974) 4 SCC 3.(Article 14)
  10. R.Coelho v. State of Tamil Nadu, AIR 2007 SC 861
  11. Indira Gandhi v. Raj Narain, 1975
  12. Keshav Madhav Menon v. State of Bombay, AIR 1951 SC 128
  13. Keshvananda Bharti v. State of Kerala, AIR 1973 SC 1461
  14. Kuldip Nayar v. Union of India, AIR 2006 SC 3127
  15. Chandra Kumar v. Union of India, AIR 1997 SC 1125
  16. Nagraj v. Union of India, AIR 2007 SC 71
  17. Maneka Gandhi v. Union of India, AIR 1978 SC 597
  18. Minerva Mills Ltd. Union of India, AIR 1980 SC 1789
  19. Raza v. State of Bombay, AIR 1966 SC 1436
  20. Olga tellis and Ors. V. Bombay Municipal Corporation 1986 AIR 180
  21. People’s Union for Democratic Rights v. Union of India, AIR 1982 SC 1473
  22. Pradeep Jain v. Union of India AIR 1984 SC 1420
  23. D.Shetty v. International Airport Authority, AIR 1979 SC 1628
  24. M.D.C v. Union of India, AIR 1957 SC 628
  25. Rajasthan State Electricity Board v. Mohan Lal, AIR 1967 SC 1857
  26. Re Special Reference case, AIR 1965, SC 745
  27. Sondur Gopal v. Sondur Rajini, 2013 SC 2678
  28. State of Gujrat v. Sri Ambika Mills, AIR 1974 SC 1300
  29. State of W.B. v. Anwar Ali Sarkar, AIR 1952 SC 75
  30. University of Madras v. Shanta Bai, AIR 1954 Mad.67.
  31. Zee Tele Films v. Union of India, AIR 2005 SC 2677

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Constitutional Law-I LWH201 CO1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 2
CO2 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1
CO3 3 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2
CO4 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 1 3 3 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code Family Law-I (LWH202)
Course Type: Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of the paper is to familiarize students with the Source, School and property relations in the familial relationship.  The legal incidence of joint family and the laws of succession – testamentary and intestate – according to the personal laws of Hindus shall be discussed in depth to create insights amongst the students who develop visions and perceptions that may promote loud thinking on a Uniform Civil Code and equality among sexes in property relations within the family.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Identify the sources of Hindu Law and Apply them to the real life situations Employability
CO2 To Undertake advocacy on Matrimonial Issues including marriage, divorce and maintanence Employability
CO3 To Represent the parties in the matrimonial disputes in courts and other appropriate forums Employability
CO4 To analyse the laws keping in mind the changes happening in family life in contemporary society Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Marriage and Divorce (Contact hours- 20)

  1. Scope of Hindu Law
  2. Schools of Hindu Law: Mitakshara School; Dayabhaga School
  3. Applicability of legislation
  4. Essentials, validity, registration of marriage
  5. Restitution of conjugal rights
  6. Theories of Divorce along with Irretrievable Breakdown of Marriage
  7. Dissolution of Marriage

SECTION B

Adoption and Maintenance (Contact hours- 10)

  1. Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956
  2. Section 125 of Criminal procedure Code,1973
  3. Hindu Minority and Guardianship Act, 1956

 

SECTION C

Partition and Succession (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Joint Hindu Family and son’s pious obligation
  2. Institution of Karta- Powers of Karta, Functions of Karta
  3. Partition
  4. Intestate succession
  5. Succession to the property of Hindu Male andHindu Female
  6. Succession to Dwelling House
  7. Enlargement of limited estate of women into their absolute estate

SECTION D

Contemporary Trends (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Live-In relationships
  2. Surrogacy arrangements
  3. Domestic Violence
  4. Same Sex marriage
  5. Inter-country Adoption
  6. Family Court- Establishment, Power and Functions

 

Text Books

  1. Paras Diwan, Modern Hindu Law, 2017, Allahabad Law Agency
  2. Poonam Pradhan Saxena, Family Law Lectures, 2011 (3rd), Lexis Nexis

Reference Books

  1. Satyajeet Desai, Mulla’s Hindu Law, 2018, Lexis Nexis
  2. M. Gandhi, Family Law, 2019 (2nd Edn.), Eastern Book Company

Important  Cases

  1. Surajmani Stella Kujur v. Durga Charan Hansdah, AIR 2001 SC 938
  2. Nagalingam v. Sivagami (2001) 7 SCC 487
  3. Bhaurao Shankar Lokhande v. State of Maharashtra, AIR 1965 SC 1564
  4. Lily Thomas v. Union of India, AIR 2000 SC 1650
  5. Pinninti Venkataramana v. State, AIR 1977 AP 43
  6. .Asha Qureshi v. Afaq Qureshi, AIR 2002 MP 263
  7. v. K., AIR 1982 Bom. 400
  8. Babui Panmato Kuer v. Ram Agya Singh, AIR 1968 Pat. 190
  9. Seema v. Ashwani Kumar (2006) 2 SCC 578
  10. Kailashwati v. Ayudhia Parkash, 1977 C.L.J. 109 (P.and H.)
  11. Swaraj Garg v. K.M. Garg, AIR 1978 Del. 296
  12. Saroj Rani v. Sudarshan Kumar, AIR 1984 SC 1562
  13. G. Dastane v. S. Dastane, AIR 1975 SC 1534
  14. Bipinchandra Jaisinghbai Shah v. Prabhavati, AIR 1957 SC 176
  15. Dharmendra Kumar v. Usha Kumar, AIR 1977 SC 2213
  16. Srinivasan v. T. Varalakshmi, 1 (1991) DMC 20 (Mad.)
  17. Hirachand Srinivas Managaonkar v. Sunanda, AIR 2001 SC 1285
  18. Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, 1 (1991) DMC 313 (SC)
  19. Brijendra v. State of M.P., AIR 2008 SC 1058
  20. Githa Hariharan v. Reserve Bank of India (1999) 2 SCC 228
  21. Amar Kanta Sen v. Sovana Sen, AIR 1960 Cal. 438
  22. Padmja Sharma v. Ratan Lal Sharma, AIR 2000 SC 1398

 

CO-PO Mapping

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Family Law-I LWH202 CO1 3 3 2 2 1 2 1 2
CO2 3 3 2 3 1 2 3 1 2
CO3 3 1 3 3 3 2 3 2 2 3
CO4 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 1 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Law Of Crimes-I (LWH203)
Course Type: Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives This paper will deal with the basic principles of criminal law determining criminal liability, general defenses and punishment.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the basic principles of criminal law and identify the key elements of a crime Employability
CO2 To list out the essential elements of offences against state, public justice and tranquillity, decency and morality and offer consultancy to the parties involved in the offence. Employability
CO3 To Explain the various types of punishments under criminal law Skill enhancement
CO4 To Represent the party in the court of law in matters of violation of criminal law Skill enhancement
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Crime and Criminal Law (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Introduction to criminal law- Evolution of criminal law in India
  2. Distinction between crime and tort
  3. Elements of crimes- Mens Rea, Actus Reus, Strict Liability offences
  4. Stages in commission of a crime: Intention, Preparation, Attempt, Commission
  5. Extent and operation of the Indian Penal Code: Preliminary provisions (up to section 5)

SECTION B

General Explanations and General exceptions (Contact hours15)

  1. General Explanations
  2. General Exceptions (selected definitions upto 52A;
  3. Offences against the State (s. 121-130): War and Sedition
  1. Public Mischief (s. 505)
  2. Offences against Public Tranquility (s. 141-160)
  3. Unlawful assembly (Interplay of sec. 34 and 149); Rioting; Affray
  4. Misconduct in Public by drunken person

SECTION C

Punishments and Offences against Public Justice, Decency, Morals and Religion, Defamation and Criminal Intimidation (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Meaning, object and kinds of Punishment in IPC
  2. Theories of Punishment in India
  3. False Evidence and Offences against Public Justice (s. 191-229 A): Giving or fabricating false evidence; Causing disappearance of evidence; False information, false charges and false impersonation
  4. Offences affecting decency, Morals and Religion: Obscene (s. 292 – 294A); Offences relating to religion (s. 295-298)
  5. Defamation (s. 499-502)
  6. Criminal Intimidation, insult and annoyance (s. 503-510)
  7. Principles of sentencing, commutation of punishment

SECTION D

Inchoate Offences and Offences against Human Body and Punishment (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Offences affecting life
  2. Offences of Hurt, wrongful restraint and wrongful confinement
  3. Offences of criminal force and assault, kidnapping and abduction

Inchoate Offences

  1. Abetment
  2. Conspiracy
  3. Attempt
  4. Joint liability and group liability

 

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/per week

  • Class moot on Criminal Law
  • Problem on mens rea
  • Discussion on difference between mistake of law and mistake of fact
  • Problem on sedition and blasphemy
  • Problem on offences against public tranquility
  • Discussion on offences relating to religion

Text Books

  1. S. Gaur, Indian Penal Code, 2014 (15th Edn.), Eastern Book Company
  2. D. Gaur, Textbook on Indian Penal Code, 2016 (6th Edn.), Universal Law Publishing

Reference Books

  1. Glanville Williams, Textbook of Criminal Law, 2012 (3rd Edn), Sweet and Maxwell
  2. JWC Turner, Russell on Crime, 1964 (latest Ed.)
  3. I. Vibhute (Rev.), P.S.A. Pillai’s Criminal Law, 2017 (13th ed.), Lexis Nexis
  4. N.C. Pillai and Shabistan Aquil (Rev.), Essays on the Indian Penal Code, 2005, The Indian Law Institute, New Delhi

Important Cases

  1. Abu Salem Abdul Qayoom Ansari v. State of Maharashtra (2011) 11 SCC 214
  2. Barender Kumar Ghosh v. King Emperor 27 Bom LR 148
  3. Vimla, AIR 1963 SC 1572
  4. Kripal Singh v. State of UP 1945 PC 118
  5. Lee Kun Hee v. State of UP AIR 2012 SC 1007
  6. Mehboob Shah v. Emperor AIR 1943 PC 118
  7. Mobarak Ali v State of Bombay, AIR 1957 SC 857
  8. Dutt v. State of UP, AIR 1960 SC 523
  9. Standard Chartered Bank v. Directorate of Enforcement AIR 2005 SC 2622
  10. State of Madhya Pradesh v. Narayan Singh (1989) 3 SCC 596
  11. State of Maharasthra v. M H George, AIR 1965 SC 722
  12. State of Orissa v. Ram Bahadur Thapa AIR 1960 Ori. 161
  13. State of UP v. Smt. Aqeela 1999 Cr. LJ 2754
  14. Allauddin Mian v. State of Bihar AIR 1989 SC 1456
  15. Amrik Singh v. State of Punjab, 1993 AIR SCW 248
  16. Barender Kumar Ghosh v. King Emperor 27 Bom LR 148
  17. Bhanwar Singh v. State of MP (2008) 16 SCC 657
  18. Mohammed Ajmal Mohammadamir Kasab v. State of Maharashtra (2012) 9 SCC 1.
  19. Mohan Singh v. State of Punjab AIR 1963 SC 174
  20. Nazir Khan v. State of Delhi (2003) 8 SCC 461
  21. Noorul Huda Maqbool Ahmed v. Ram Deo Tyagi (2011) 7 SCC 95
  22. v. Sabed Ali (1873) 11 Beng LR 347 WR (Cr.) 5
  23. Shaukat Hussain Guru v. State of Delhi AIR 2008 SC 2419
  24. State (NCT of Delhi) v. Navjot Sandhu @afsan Guru AIR 2005 SC 3820
  25. Bobby Art International v. Om Pal Singh Hooon AIR 1966 SC 1846
  26. Queen Empress v. Imam Ali (1888) ILR 10 All 150 (FB)
  27. v. Hicklin, (1868) 3 QB 360
  28. Ranjit D. Udeshi AIR 1965 SC 881
  29. Samara Bose v. Amal Mitra AIR 1986 SC 967
  30. Sheo Shankar v. Emperor AIR 1940 Oudh 348
  31. Srivokti Swamy (1885) 1 Weir 153
  32. Amulya Kumar Bahera v. Nabaghana Bahera 1995 Cr. LJ 355 (Ori.)
  33. R.K. Murthy v. state 2013 Cr. LJ 1602(AP)
  34. Harikishan and State of Haryana v. Sukhbir Singh AIR 1988 SC 2131
  35. Kanwar Singh v. Delhi Administration – AIR 1965 SC 871
  36. Kehar Singh v. State (Delhi Administrator) – AIR 1988 SC 1883
  37. v. sandhu (Manjit) 2008 WL 5044248; (2008) EW CA 2687
  38. Rani Johar v. State of MP Writ Petition no. 30 of 2015
  39. Rupan Deol Bajaj v. KPS Gill – AIR 1996 SC 309
  40. Sarwan Singh v. State of Punjab AIR 1978 SC 1525
  41. Shreya Singhal v. UOI AIR 2015 SC 1523

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Law of Crimes-I LWH203 CO1 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3
CO2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
CO3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1
CO4 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

 

 

Course Title/Code  

MARKETING MANAGEMENT (LWH215)

 

Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Objectives The course aims at making students understand concepts, philosophies, processes techniques of managing the marketing operations of a firm.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Demonstrate a clear understanding of the marketing concepts. Entrepreneurship
CO2 Analyze how organizations leverage the marketing mix and take decisions to market their
products/services to their target customers.
Entrepreneurship
CO3 Explain common tools and approaches used to measure marketing communication effectiveness. Entrepreneurship
CO4 Synthesize how distribution channels affect the marketing of products and services. Entrepreneurship
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Lectures– 15)

  1. Meaning, Nature and Scope of Marketing
  2. Core Marketing Concepts
  3. Marketing Philosophies
  4. Concept of Marketing Mix
  5. Understanding Marketing Environment
  6. Consumer and Organisation Buyer Behaviour
  7. Market Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning

 

 

SECTION B

Product Planning and Pricing (Lectures- 15)

 

  1. Product Concept
  2. Types of Products
  3. Major Product Decisions
  4. Product Life Cycle, New Product Development Process
  5. Pricing Decisions – Determinants of Price; Pricing Process; Policies and Strategies

SECTION C

Promotion and Distribution Decisions (Lectures– 15)

  1. Communication Process
  2. Promotion Tools-Advertising, Personal Selling, Publicity and Sales Promotion
  3. Distribution Channel Decisions-Types and Functions of Intermediaries, Selection and Management of Intermediaries

SECTION D

Emerging Trends and Issues in Marketing (Lectures– 15)

  1. Consumerism, Rural Marketing, Social Marketing
  2. Direct Marketing
  3. Green Marketing
  4. Digital Marketing – Online and Social Media Marketing
  5. Marketing Ethics

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/per week

  • Case Study discussion
  • Marketing Debate- Right Price vs Fair Price / With products, Is it Form or Function
  • Marketing Debate / Discussion- TV vs Internet Advertising / Channel Conflict  Assignment and Presentation on emerging trends

 

 

Text Books:

  1. Baines, C. Fill, K. Page, P.K. Sinha, Marketing, 2013 (Asian Edn.), Oxford University Press, Delhi
  2. Philip Kotler, K.L. Keeler, A. Koshy, M. Jha, Marketing Management: A South Asian Perspective, Pearson Education, Delhi

Reference Books:

  1. Arun Kumar, N.Meenakshi, Marketing Management, 2016, Vikas Publishing House, Noida
  2. Darymple Douglas, and Leonard J. Parsons, Marketing Management: Text and Cases 2003, (7th Edn.), John Wiley and Sons
  3. J. Etzel, B.J. Walker, W.J. Stanton, A. Pandit, Marketing, 2017 (14th Edn.), McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
  4. S. Ramaswamy, S. Namakumari, Marketing Management – Global Perspective, Indian Context, 2009 (4th Edn.), Macmillan Publishers India

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
MARKETING MANAGEMENT

 

LWH215 CO1 3 1 2 1 1 3 3 2 2
CO2 3 2 2 1 1 3 3 3 2
CO3 3 1 2 1 1 3 3 2 2
CO4 3 1 2 1 1 3 3 2 2

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code BUSINESS MATHEMATICS (LWH216)
Course Type: Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Objectives The purpose of the Business Mathematics is to introduce students to the basic tools of statistics
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Understand and explain the concept of set theory for solving related mathematical problems. Employability
CO2 Compute measures of central tendency and solve statistical problems. Employability
CO3 Compute measures of dispersion and solve statistical problems. Employability
CO4 Understand and apply the concept of correlation and regression to solve statistical problems Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Basic Set theory and Data Collection (Lectures- 15)

  1. Definition of set, set formation, notations, types of sets, Operations on sets, Algebra of sets, cardinality of set, Venn diagrams, Cartesian product of two sets
  2. Introduction to statistics: variables, types of variables
  3. Numerical data, Collection and presentation of data: Methods of collection importance, Uses in Behavioral studies

SECTION B

Measurement of Central tendency (Lectures- 15)

  1. Introduction; average or measurement of central tendency; Mean, Median and Mode; AM, GM and HM; Relation between Mean, Median and Mode; Variance and coefficient of variation; Partition Values – Quartiles, deciles, percentiles

SECTION C

Measurement of dispersion and Regression (Lectures- 15)

  1. Dispersion:Measurement of Dispersion, Meaning, Range, Mean Deviation, Standard deviation; Quartile deviation, Comparison and measurement, Standard properties of SD.
  2. Introduction – Meaning of Regression; Linear regression; Regression Curve

SECTION D

Correlation

Introduction, Concepts, Bivariate data, Bivariate FD, Correlation, Covariance; Correlation coefficient; Karl Pearson’s Coefficient of Correlation., Rank of coefficient of Correlation. Difference between correlation and regression

Text Books:

  1. Robert A. Stine, Dean Foster, Statistics for Business: Decision Making and Analysis, 2017, (3rd ), Pearson
  2. S.K. Khandelwal, Business Statistics, International Book House
  3. Lipschutz and M.L. Lipson, Discrete Mathematics, 2014, Tata McGraw-Hill

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Business Mathematics LWH216 CO1 3 3 2 1 2
CO2 3 3 3 2 2
CO3 3 3 3 2 2
CO4 3 3 3 2 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (LWH217)

 

Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-0-0)
Objective Finance is the backbone of an organization and efficient management of finance is directly related to the efficient management of enterprise. The objective of this course is to acquaint the students with the overall framework of financial decision-making in a business unit.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Understand the fundamentals principles of FM. Employability
CO2 Understand scope and functions of FM. Employability
CO3 Understand and apply concepts of Time value of Money Employability
CO4 Take decisions using Capital Budgeting, Cost of capital. Employability
CO5 Explain and apply the concepts leverages, types, significance. Entrepreneurship
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Lectures– 15)

  1. Introduction
  2. Objectives of Financial Management
  3. Scope and Functions of Financial Managers
  4. Profit Vs Wealth Maximization,
  5. Agency Costs
  6. Time Value of Money

SECTION B

Capital Budgeting Decisions (Lectures – 15)

  1. Capital Budgeting Decisions,
  2. Nature of Investment Decisions,
  3. Investment Evaluation Criteria: NPV, IRR, Profitability Index, Payback Period, Accounting Rate of Return

SECTION C

Cost of Capital (Lectures – 15)

  1. Meaning, Factors Affecting Cost of Capital, Significance
  2. Capital Structure Theories: Concept of Value of Firm, Factors Determining Capital Structure, Financial Distress
  3. Leverages: Meaning, Types, Significance
  4. Dividend Policy: Definition and Types of Dividends, Determinants of Dividend Policy, Rights and Bonus Shares

SECTION D

Working Capital Management (Lectures– 15)

  1. Significance of Working Capital Management
  2. Types of Working Capital, Objectives of Inventory Management
  3. Types of Inventory
  4. Motives for Holding Cash
  5. Objectives of Cash Management
  6. Costs and Benefits of Accounts Receivable
  7. Concept of Factoring

 

 

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/per week

  • Techniques of Compounding and Discounting, Learning the Advantages of Saving Early
  • Studying Investment Evaluation Criteria on MS Excel, Practical Problems on NPV, IRR, Profitability Index, Payback Period, Accounting Rate of Return
  • Studying Capital Structure of Companies in India, Case Study on Indian Companies that have Declared Dividend in Recent Past, Discussion on Effect of Dividends on Stock Price
  • Discussion on Types of Short Term Finances Available to Corporate, Presentation on Factoring Services Provided by Various Banks and Financial Institutions

Text Books:

  1. M. Pandey, Financial Management 2010 (10th ed.) (Vikas Publishing House)
  2. M. Khan, and P. K. Jain, Financial Management 2012 (6th ed.) (Tata McGraw Hill Company)

Reference Books:

  1. Prasanna Chandra, Financial Management: Theory and Practice, 2019 (10th), Tata McGraw Hill
  2. Van C. Horne and M. Wachowich, Fundamentals of Financial Management, 2008 (13th ), Prentice Hall of India

Scheme of Evaluation:

  • Internal Assessment – 40 Marks
  • T1/Begin –term Exam- 30 Marks
  • T2/ Mid-term Exam – 30 Marks
  • T3/ End-term Exam – 100 Marks
  • CO-PO MAPPING
Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

 

LWH217 CO1 3 3 2 1 2
CO2 3 3 3 2 2
CO3 3 3 3 2 2
CO4 3 3 3 2 2
CO5 1 3 1 3 2 3 2 1 1 3   3

 

 

SEMESTER- IV

 

Course Code

Course Name Offering Department Course Type (Deptt/Allied/Core/Elective/Audit) Structure Credits
  L T P  
LWH208 Constitutional Law-II LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH209 Family Law-II LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH210 Law of Crimes-II LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH219 Organizational Behaviour Management Core 4 1 0 4
LWH212 Legal and Constitutional History LAW Core 4 1 0 4
CHH137 Environmental Studies CH Core 2 1 1 4
LWH214 Departmental Seminar-II   Core     0 1
  Total (LTP/Credits) 22 6 2 25

 

 

 

 

DETAILED SYLLABUS

 

Course Title/ Code Constitutional Law-II (LWH208)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The Objective of this paper is to provide understanding of basic concepts of Indian Constitution and various organs created by the Constitution and their functions.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Compare the Parliamentary system with other forms of governance Employability
CO2 To List out the powers and the functions of Union and State Legislature and Executive in India Employability
CO3 To Identify the jurisdiction and powers of the different courts in India Skill development
CO4 To Describe the governance at Municipality level and in tribal areas, and suggest effective solutions for social welfare Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

The Union and the State Executive (Contact hours– 15)

  1. The President – Qualifications, Election, Term of Office, Powers, Position, Impeachment (Articles 52-62, 72, 123); Union Council of Ministers – aid and advise to President (Article 74); Other Provisions as to Council of ministers(Article 75); Conduct of executive actions (Article 77); Duties of Prime Minister towards President of India (Article 78)
  2. Governor – Qualifications, Election, Term of Office, Powers, Position (Articles 153 – 161, 213); State Council of Ministers (Article 163); Other Provisions as to Council of ministers (Article 164); Conduct of executive actions of State (Article 166); Duties of Chief Minister towards Governor (Article 167)

SECTION B

Parliament and State Legislature (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Composition of Parliament, Qualification of members (Articles 79 – 88); Disqualification of Members (Articles 102-103); Legislative Procedure -Provisions as to passing of Bills (Articles 107-111)
  2. State legislatures, Qualification of members (Articles 168 –176); Disqualification of Members (Articles 191-192); Legislative Procedure -Provisions as to passing of Bills(Articles 196- 200) Centre State Relationship – Legislative, Administrative (Articles 245- 263)
  3. Trade, Commerce and intercourse within the territory of India (Articles 301-307)

 

SECTION C

Union and State Judiciary (Contact hours– 15)

  1. The Supreme Court of India – Composition, Appointment and Removal of Judges (Articles 124-130); Jurisdiction of Supreme Court (Articles 131-134, 136-138); Binding nature of the law (Articles 141- 142), Advisory Jurisdiction (Article 143); Rules of Court (Article 145)
  2. The High Courts in the States – Composition, Appointment and Removal of Judges (Articles 214-228)
  3. The Subordinate courts (Articles 233-237)
  4. Gram Nyayalayas

 

SECTION D

Other Provisions (Contact hours– 15)

  1. The Panchayats
  2. The Municipalities
  3. The Scheduled and Tribal Areas
  4. Proclamation of Emergency on grounds of war, external aggression and armed rebellion (Articles 352 – 353); Duty of the Union to protect the States (Article 355); Imposition of President’s Rule in States (Articles 356-357); Financial Emergency (Article 360)
  5. Power and Procedure to amend the Constitution (Article 368); Limitations on amending Power;Doctrine of Basic Structure.

Tutorial activities 1 Hr /Week

  • Analysis of Supreme Court cases
  • Mock Parliament – Passing of a Bill
  • Visit to Parliament
  • Discussion on judicial system in India
  • Interaction on Gram Nyayalaya Act, 2009
  • Moot Court exercise

Text Book

  1. P. Jain, Indian Constitutional Law, 2018 (8th Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  2. N. Shukla, Constitution of India,2017, (13th Edn.), Eastern Book Company

Reference Books

  1. D. Basu, Introduction to the Constitution of India, 2018 (23rd Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  2. M. Seervai, Constitutional Law of India, 2016 (4th Edn.), Universal Law Publishing Co.
  3. N. Pandey, Constitutional Law of India, 2018 (51st Edn.), Central Law Agency
  4. Narender Kumar, Constitutional Law of India, 2018, Allahabad Law Agency
  5. M. Bakshi, The Constitution of India, 2018 (15th Edn.), Universal Law Publishing Co.

Important Cases

  1. Anil Kumar Jha v. Union of India, (2005) 3 SCC 150
  2. R. Kapur v. State of T. N. AIR 2001 SC 3435
  3. C. Wadhwa v. State of Bihar, AIR 1987 SC 579
  4. Epuru Sudhakar v. Govt. of A.P., AIR 2006 SC 338
  5. Government of Delhi v. Lieutenant Governor of Delhi (SC) (Decided on July 4, 2018)
  6. R. Coelho v. State of Tamil Nadu, AIR 2007 SC 861 : (2007) 2 SCC 1
  7. In re Keshav Singh, AIR 1965 SC 745
  8. In re Special Reference No. 1 of 1998, AIR 1999 SC 1
  9. Jaya Bachchan v. Union of India, AIR 2006 SC 2119
  10. Kesavananda Bharati v. State of Kerala, AIR 1973 SC 1461
  11. Kihoto Hollohon v. Zachillhu, AIR 1993 SC 4120
  12. Chandra Kumar v. Union of India, AIR 1997 SC 1125
  13. Lily Thomas v. Union of India, (2013) 7 SCC 653.
  14. P. Spl. Police Estab. v. State of M.P., (2004) 8 SCC 788
  15. Madras Bar Association v. Union of India AIR 2015 SC 1571
  16. Raja Ram Pal v. Hon’ble Speaker, Lok Sabha (2007) 3 SCC
  17. Rameshwar Prasad v. Union of India, AIR 2006 SC 980
  18. P. Gupta v. President of India, AIR 1982 SC 149
  19. R. Bommai v. Union of India, AIR 1994 SC 1918
  20. P. Anand v. H.D. Deve Gowda, AIR 1997 SC 272
  21. Samsher Singh v. State of Punjab, AIR 1974 SC 212
  22. SC Adv. on Record Association v. Union of India, 2015 (11) SCALE 1
  23. Spl Ref. No. 1 of 2002 (Gujarat Assembly) AIR 2003 SC 87
  24. State of Rajasthan v. Union of India, AIR 1977 SC 1361
  25. N. R. Rao v. Indira Gandhi, AIR 1971 SC 1002

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
CONSTITUTIONAL LAW-II LWH208 CO1 3 1 2 2 2     – 1 2 1 2
CO2 3 1 2 2 3     – 1 1 1 2
CO3 3 1 2 2 3 2 1 1 1 2
CO4 3 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Family Law-II (LWH209)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of the paper is to familiarize students with the Source, School and property relations in the familial relationship.  The legal incidence of joint family and the laws of succession – testamentary and intestate – according to the personal laws of Muslims shall be discussed in depth to create insights amongst the students who develop visions and perceptions that may promote loud thinking on a Uniform Civil Code and equality among sexes in property relations within the family.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Identify the sources and schools of Muslim Law Employability
CO2 To Counsel and represent the parties on the matters of marriage, dower, maintenance and dissolution of marriage Skill development
CO3 To Represent the parties in property matters in succession, Hiba and wakf Skill development
CO4 To Analyze the contemporary issues and changes in the Muslim Law Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Sources and Schools of Muslim Law (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Historical Background and Advent of Muslim Era
  2. Sources- Primary and Other
  3. Schools of Muslim Law- Sunnis and Shias
  4. Application of Muslim Law

SECTION B

Nikah (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Solemnization of Marriage
  2. Conditions for validity
  3. Classification and types
  4. Dower
  5. Maintenance
  6. Acknowledgement of Paternity
  7. Special Marriage

SECTION C

Divorce (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Extra-judicial – Talaq, Khula, Mubarat
  2. Judicial – The Dissolution of Muslim Marriages Act, 1939

SECTION D

Succession (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Gifts:Meaning and essentials of a valid gift; Gift of Mushaa; Gift made during Marz-ul-Maut
  2. Wills: Capacity to make Will ; Subject matter of Will; To whom Will can be made; Abatement of legacies
  3. Inheritance:General rules of inheritance of Sunnis and Shias; Classification of heirs
  4. Wakfs

Important Cases

  1. Abdul Hafiz Beg v. Sahebbi, AIR 1975 Bom. 165 178
  2. Hayatuddin v. Abdul Gani, AIR 1976 Bom. 23 171
  3. Mussa Miya walad Mahammed Shaffi v. Kadar Bax, AIR 1928 PC 108 160
  4. Valia Peedikakkandi Katheessa Umma v. Pathakkalan Narayanath Kunhamu, AIR 1964 SCC 275 165
  5. Yousuf Rawther v. Sowramma, AIR 1971 Ker. 261
  6. Chand Patel v. Bismillah Begum, 1 (2008) DMC 588 (SC)
  7. Danial Latifi v. Union of India (2001) 7 SCC 740
  8. Ghulam Sakina v. Falak Sher Allah Baksh, AIR 1950 Lah. 45
  9. Itwari v. Asghari, AIR 1960 All. 684
  10. Masroor Ahmed v. Delhi (NCT) 2008 (103) DRJ 137 (Del.)
  11. Ghulam Kubra Bibi v. Mohd. Shafi Mohd. Din, AIR 1940 Pesh. 2
  12. Noor Saba Khatoon v. Mohd. Quasim, AIR 1997 SC 3280
  13. Saiyid Rashid Ahmad v. Mt. Anisa Khatun, AIR 1932 PC 25
  14. Shamim Ara v. State of U.P., 2002 Cr LJ 4726 (SC)
  15. Shayara Bano v. UoI (SC) (Decided on August 22, 2017)

Text Books:

  1. Asaf A. A. Fyzee,Outlines of Muhammadan Law, 2018, Oxford University Press
  2. Noshirvan Jhabwala, Muhammadan Law, 2017, C. Jamnadas and Co.

Reference Books:

  1. Aqeel Ahmad, Mohammedan Law, 2016, Central Law Agency
  2. Hidayatulla and Arshad Hidayatulla, Mulla’s Principles of Mahomedan Law, 2010, Lexis Nexis
  3. Satyajeet A. Desai, Mulla’s Hindu Law, 2018, Lexis Nexis

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
FAMILY LAW-II LWH209 CO1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1
CO2 3 1 3 2 3 1 2 1 2
CO3 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 3 1 2
CO4 3 1 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 2

 

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Law of Crimes-II (LWH210)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of this paper is to acquaint students with substantive criminal law. The paper focuses on understanding of provisions ranging from section 298 to 511 under Indian Penal Code,1860.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To differentiate between civil wrongs and crimes and explain various stages of crime Employability
CO2 To List out the essential elements of crimes against the body, property, women and marriage. Employability
CO3 To Counsel and represent the parties through investigation and trial. Skill development
CO4 To Formulate and express opinions based on statutory provisions, relevent judgments and contemporary issues in criminal law Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Offences against Human Body- I   (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Offences affecting life
  2. Offences of Hurt
  3. Wrongful restraint and Wrongful confinement
  4. Criminal Force and Assault.

SECTION B

Offences against Human Body -II (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Kidnapping and Abduction
  2. Sexual Offences
  3. Unnatural Offence

SECTION C

Offences relating to Marriage (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Cruelty by Husband or Relatives of Husband
  2. Criminal Intimidation, Insult or Annoyance
  3. Attempt to Commit Offences
  4. Defamation

SECTION D

Offences against Property (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Theft, Extortion, Robbery and Dacoity
  2. Criminal Misappropriation of Property
  3. Criminal Breach of Trust
  4. Cheating
  5. Mischief
  6. Criminal Trespass
  7. Defamation – with relation to torts

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/per week

  • “Without Culpable Homicide there cannot be a Murder”– Analyzing Culpable Homicide amounting/not amounting to Murder. – (BT – Level IV)
  • Understanding the difference between Culpable Homicide and Murder. – (BT – Level II)
  • Classifying the distinction between Hurt and Grievous Hurt. – (BT – Level II)
  • Explaining the difference between Criminal Force and Assault. – (BT – Level I)
  • Listing the laws relating to grave and sudden provocation. – (BT – Level III)
  • Analysis on Evolution of Women Related Crimes – S.376. – (BT – Level IV)
  • Test of provisions under the Criminal Amendment Act. – (BT – Level VI)
  • Recall of different stages of Crime and difference between commission and attempt to commit a crime. – (BT – Level I,II)
  • Case Law on wrongful restraint and wrongful confinement. – (BT – Level II)
  • Understanding the difference between theft and Robbery – (BT – Level IV)
  • Examining when Theft amounts to Extortion. – (BT – Level IV)
  • List out the differences between Robbery and Dacoity – (BT – Level I)

Text Books:

  1. H.S. Gaur, Indian Penal Code, 2014 (15th Edn.), Eastern Book Company
  2. K.D. Gaur, Textbook on Indian Penal Code, 2016 (6th Edn.), Universal Law Publishing

Reference Books:

  1. Glanville Williams, Textbook of Criminal Law, 2012 (3rd Edn.), Sweet and Maxwell
  2. J.W.C. Turner, Russell on Crime, 1964 (latest Edn.)
  3. K.I. Vibhute (Rev.), P.S.A. Pillai’s Criminal Law, 2017 (13th Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  4. K.N.C. Pillai and Shabistan Aquil (Rev.), Essays on the Indian Penal Code, 2005, The Indian Law Institute, New Delhi

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 Po10 PS01 PS02
LAW OF CRIMES-II LWH210 CO1 3 2 2 2 1 2 2 2
CO2 3 3 3 2 1 2 2 2
CO3 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
CO4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR (LWH219)

 

Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Objective To help the students develop perspectives on the relevance of human behaviour in organizations, and gain ability to synthesize related information to predict and control human behaviour for improved business results
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Develop understanding of the fundamental concepts and approaches in the field of organizational behavior. Employability
CO2 Demonstrate the applicability of the concept of organizational behavior to understand the behaviour of people in the organization. Employability
CO3 Analyze group dynamics in the organization, and demonstrate skills required for effective working in groups. Skill Enhancement
CO4 Assess the potential effects of organisational‐level factors (such as leadership, learning, personality, motivation, culture, communication and change) on organisational behaviour Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to study of OB (Lectures- 15)

  1. Concept and Importance of Organizational Behavior (OB)
  2. Managerial skills required in O B
  3. Various Roles played by a Manager—-Interpersonal Roles, Informational Roles Decisional Roles etc.
  4. Challenges and Opportunities for OB.
  5. Effective and Successful Manager
  6. Dependent and independent variables in O B.
  7. Historical Evolution of O B
  8. Concept of Learning

SECTION B

Leaning, Personality and Motivation (Lectures-15)

  1. Concept of Learning
  2. Introduction to Personality: Definition and Meaning; Determinants of Personality
  3. Motivation: Definition and meaning; Theories; How to develop Challenging and Motivational jobs

SECTION C

Leadership and Organizational Communication (Lectures- 15)

  1. Leadership: Meaning; Theories of Leadership; Contemporary Business leaders
  2. Organizational Communication: Importance; Barriers to communication; Centralized VS. Decentralized communication channel; Rumors and how to handle negative effects of rumors; How to make communication more effective

SECTION D

Organizational Culture, Politics and Change (Lectures- 15)

  1. Organizational Culture, Function of OC
  2. Organizational politics and conflicts, How to resolve such conflicts
  3. Introduction to groups, Difference between groups and Crowds, Reasons and stages in the formation of groups
  4. Organizational change, Resistance to change, How to overcome resistance to change

 

Text Books:

1.L.N. Prassad, Organizational Behaviour, 2018 (18th Edn.),  Pearson

2.P.C. Pardeshi, Organizational Behaviour and Principles of Management, Nirali Publications

3.Sanjay Kaptan, Cases and Problems in Organizational Behaviour and Human Relations, Everest Publishing House

 

Reference Book:

  1. Luthens Fred, Organizational Behaviour, 2017 (12th Edn.), MaGraw Hill Education

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR LWH219 CO1 2 1 3 1 1 3 2 1 1
CO2 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 1
CO3 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 1
CO4 2 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 1

 

Course Title/ Code Legal and Constitutional History (LWH212)
Course Type: Core (Departmental)
L-T-P-O Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of this paper is to make student understand changes that took place in the colonial times in the Indian society and the economy in general, the legal system in particular. It seeks to answer some basic questions- How did contemporary India emerge? What were the processes and events that shaped it? Why and how did the present legal system evolve? What were the various ideas and elements that went into the making of British policies? What were the changes that took place in the courts and laws in the colonial times and how they impacted the Indians and their old systems? How did Indian Nationalism emerge and what were the forms it took? What was the genesis of some of the problems like communalism? What were the concerns of the framers of the constitution and the major debates? Finally how the concept of Indian secularism emerged during the national movement and was adopted post- independence.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Trace the history of contemporary legal and court system Employability
CO2 To Illustrate the impact of Freedom and other socio-legal movements on Indian Legal and Court System Employability
CO3 To Highlight the constituent assembly debates regarding Indian legal and Court system Employability
CO4 To Compare the contemporary court system and other Dispute Redressal Authorities in different states in India Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Colonialism, its nature and various stages in India (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Early settlements in Surat, Madras, Bombay, Calcutta
  2. Establishment of Supreme Court in Calcutta and cases of Nand Kumar, Patna case, and Cossijurah case.
  3. Establishment of Adalat system and reforms
  4. Charter Act of 1833 and 1853 and Codification of laws
  5. Establishment of High Courts under the Indian High Courts Act, 1861
  6. Federal court and Privy Council- an appraisal
  7. Development of the Legal profession.

SECTION B

Social awakening and law reforms (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Socio- Religious reform movement in the 19th Century
  2. Struggle against caste and the efforts made for the emancipation of women
  3. Progressive social reforms – The Abolition of Sati Act, 1828, Abolition of slavery Act, 1833, Caste Disability Removal Act, 1850, Infanticide Act

SECTION C

Rise and Growth of the Indian National Movement (Contact hours– 15)

  1. The revolt of 1857 and its impact
  2. Indian National Congress- its genesis, aims and objectives; Moderates and extremists
  3. Partition of Bengal and Swadeshi movement
  4. Emergence of Mahatma Gandhi
  5. Non Co-operation and Khilafat movement 1919-1922
  6. Civil Disobedience Movement 1930-1934
  7. Quit India movement
  8. The Simla conference
  9. The Cabinet Mission
  10. Partition of India
  11. Government of India Act, 1935
  12. The Independence Act, 1947

SECTION D

Birth of Constitution of India (Contact hours– 15)

  1. The Constituent assembly
  2. Framing of the constitution and the issues of federal polity vs centralism
  3. Fundamental Rights and Directive principles
  4. Secularism
  5. Uniform Civil Code
  6. Accession of the princely states
  7. Re-organisation of the states and growth of regionalism

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Nand Kumar (Judicial Murder case)
  • Hastings impeachment
  • Patna case
  • Cossijurah Case
  • Law commission- Macaulay
  • Film Les Miserables/ Mother India and discussion on changing concept of justice
  • Retrospective of films on Partition: Pinjar, Tamas
  • Discussion on Ramachandra Guha, India After Gandhi: The History of World’s Largest Democracy

Text Books

  1. L.O. Garren and Abdul Hamid, A Constitutional History of India, 1600-1935, 1936, London
  2. P. Jain, Outlines of Indian Legal History, 2010 (6th Edn.), Wadhwa and Co., Nagpur
  3. P. Singh, Outlines of Indian Legal History, 2010, Universal Law Publishing Co, New Delhi
  4. D. Kulshrehtha and V.M. Gandhi, Landmarks of Indian Legal and Constitutional History,2005, Eastern Book Company

Reference Books

  1. Ania Loomba, Colonialism/ Post-colonialism, 1992, Routledge, New Delhi
  2. Bipan Chandra, Communalism in Modern India, 2008, Har Anand Publication Pvt. Ltd.
  3. Bipan Chandra, Mridula and Aditya Muherjee, India Since Independence, 2008, Penguin
  4. David Ludden, India and South Asia: A Short History (Including Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka), 2004, Oxford
  5. Granville Austin, The Making of Indian Constitution, 1999, Oxford University Press
  6. Radha Kumar, The History of Doing: An Illustrated Account of Movements for Women’s Rights and Feminism in India, 1800-1990, 1993, Zubaan
  7. Ramachandra Guha, India After Gandhi : The History of World Largest Democracy, 2008, Macmilan

 

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY LWH212 CO1 1 2 2 2 3 3 1 3 3 3
CO2 1 2 2 2 3 3 1 3 3 3
CO3 1 2 2 2 3 3 1 3 3 3
CO4 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

 

 

 

 

Course Title/Code

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (CHH137)
Course Type: University Compulsory
L-T-P Structure (2-1-1)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of this paper is to  make the student identify the areas of environmental degradation, to make the student identify the impact of environmental degradation on the surroundings, to enable student apply the concept of sustainable development in real life and to help the student to correlate his/her field with various aspects of environment.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 Explain the multidisciplinary dimensions of environmental issues and suggest potential solutions Employability, Skill development, Entrepreneurship
CO2 Discuss about the various types of organisms and draw inferences about their interactions in different e systems Employability, Skill development, Entrepreneurship
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Multidisciplinary nature of environmental studies: Definition, scope and importance, Need for public awareness (OC)

Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources: Forest resources: Use and over-exploitation, deforestation, case studies. Timber extraction, mining, dams and their effects on forest and tribal people.

Water resources: Use and over-utilization of surface and ground water, floods, drought, conflicts over water, dams-benefits and problems.

Mineral resources: Use and exploitation, environmental effects of extracting and using mineral resources, case studies.

Food resources: World food problems, changes caused by agriculture and overgrazing, effects of modern agriculture, fertilizer-pesticide problems, water logging, salinity, case studies.

SECTION B

Energy resources: Growing energy needs, renewable and non-renewable energy sources, use of alternate energy sources. Case studies (OC). Land resources: Land as a resource, land degradation, man induced landslides, soil erosion and desertification.

Role of an individual in conservation of natural resources. (OC) Equitable use of resources for sustainable lifestyle

Ecosystems: Concept of an ecosystem. Structure and function of an ecosystem., Producers, consumers and decomposers, Energy flow in the ecosystem, Ecological succession, Food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids, Introduction, types, characteristic features, structure and function of the following ecosystem :- Forest ecosystem, Grassland ecosystem, Desert ecosystem, Aquatic ecosystems (ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, oceans, estuaries) (OC)

Biodiversity and its conservation: Introduction – Definition: genetic, species and ecosystem diversity, Biogeographical classification of India.

Value of biodiversity: consumptive use, productive use, social, ethical, aesthetic and option values (OC), Biodiversity at global, National and local levels, India as a mega-diversity nation, Hot-sports of biodiversity, Threats to biodiversity: habitat loss, poaching of wildlife, man-wildlife conflicts, Endangered and endemic species of India, Conservation of biodiversity: In-situ and Ex-situ conservation of biodiversity (OC).

 

SECTION C

Environmental Pollution: Definition, Cause, effects and control measures of :- Air pollution, Water pollution, Soil pollution, Marine pollution, Noise pollution, Thermal pollution, Nuclear hazards, Solid waste Management : Causes, effects and control measures of urban and

Industrial wastes. (OC), Role of an individual in prevention of pollution. (OC), Pollution case studies. (OC), Disaster management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and landslides.

Social Issues and the Environment: From Unsustainable to Sustainable development, Urban problems related to energy, Water conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed management, Resettlement and rehabilitation of people; its problems and concerns. Case

Studies, Environmental ethics: Issues and possible solutions.

SECTION D

Climate change, global warming, acid rain, ozone layer depletion, nuclear accidents and holocaust. Case Studies (OC): Wasteland reclamation, Consumerism and waste products, Environment Protection Act, Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act (OC), Water (Prevention and control of Pollution) Act (OC), Wildlife Protection Act, Forest Conservation Act, Issues involved in enforcement of environmental legislation (OC), Public awareness (OC).

Human Population and the Environment: Population growth, variation among nations, Population explosion – Family Welfare Programme, Environment and human health, Human Rights (OC), Value Education (OC), HIV/AIDS (OC), Women and Child Welfare (OC), Role of Information Technology in Environment and human health, Case Studies (OC).

*OC = Outcome component

Field work

  • Visit to a local area to document environmental assets river/ forest/grassland/hill/mountain
  • Visit to a local polluted site-Urban/Rural/Industrial/Agricultural
  • Study of common plants, insects, birds.
  • Study of simple ecosystems-pond, river, hill slopes, etc.
  • Any socially relevant problem identification and proposing its possible solution

NOTE:  Manav Rachna has adopted five villages, where students would be visiting, will identify the socially relevant issues and work on to provide possible solution

 

EVS Practical (CHS102)

  • Visit to a local area to document environmental assets- river/forest/grassland/hill/mountain
  • Visit to a local polluted site-Urban/Rural/Industrial/Agricultural
  • Study of common plants, insects, birds
  • Study of simple ecosystems-pond, river, hill slopes, etc. (Field work Equal to 5 lecture hours)

Text Books

  1. K. De, Environmental Chemistry, 2016, Wiley Eastern Ltd.
  2. ErachBharucha, The Biodiversity of India , Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd., Ahmedabad
  3. C. Agarwal, Environmental Biology, 2001, Nidi Publ. Ltd. Bikaner
  4. S. Clark, Marine Pollution, 2001, Clanderson Press Oxford

Reference Books

  1. Baird and W. H. M. Cann, Environmental Chemistry, 2012, Freeman and Company, New York
  2. J-Gonzalez and D.J.C. Constable, Green Chemistry and engineering: A practical DesignApproach, 2011, John Wiley and Sons, New Jersey
  3. John Grant, The Green marketing Manifesto, 2007, Wiley Publications
  4. KaushikandKaushik, Perspectives in Environmental Studies, 2018, New age international publishers Ltd., New Delhi

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 Po5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CHH137 CO1 3 3 3 3 3
CO2 3 3 3 3

 

Course Title/ Code Departmental Seminar-II (LWN214)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (0-0-2)
Credits 1
Course Objective The objective of this course is to make students hone their knowledge and practical skill of critical thinking and presentation.

 

INTRODUCTION

Departmental Seminar is aimed at enhancing research acumen of law students. This is an exclusive initiative of the Faculty of Law and is made University mandatory course to be complete by each students, which carries 1 credit. The exercise has been made part of the course curriculum, which shall help students develop their critical and analytical thinking and writing and presentation skills.

THEME – CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND CRIMINAL LAW

Guidelines

  1. Compulsory activity for the law students.
  2. Teams of 2 students will be registered. It is mandatory for both the team members to speak. Marks shall be given to the students individually.
  3. Activity is for 1 credit i.e. 50 marks
  4. Written submission shall be for 25 marks and presentation for 25 marks.
  5. Plagiarism is strictly prohibited.
  6. Detailed schedule of presentation shall be intimated in due course

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR-II LWN214 CO1 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 3
CO2 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 3
CO3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 3

 

SEMESTER- V

Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type (Deptt/Allied/Core/Elective/Audit) Structure Credits
    L T P  
LWH301 Administrative Law LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH302 Company Law LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH303 Criminal Procedure Code LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH304 Law of Evidence LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH305 Legal Enterprises LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH314 Strategic Management MGMT Core 4 0 0 4
LWO307 Internship Viva-II LAW Core 0 0 1 1
Total (L-T-P/Credits) 24 6 0 25

 

 

DETAILED SYLLABUS

Course Title/ Code ADMINISTRATIVE LAW (LWH301)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The paper will make students aware of various aspects of Administrative Law including quasi-legislative, quasi-judicial and other ministerial functions of administration thereof with a practical approach.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the role of administrative law in execution and implementation of legal rules. Employability
CO2 To Identify the core principles of administrative law Employability
CO3 To Apply the major and minor premises of constitutional law harmoniously in administrative law Skill enhancement
CO4 To Critically analyze the sub-delegation and imbalance of power among state and non-state actors Skill enhancement
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction of Administrative Law (Class Hours 15)

  1. Meaning, Nature and Scope of Administrative Law
  2. Relationship between Administrative Law and Constitutional Law
  3. Rule of Law
  4. Separation of Powers

SECTION B

Legislative Functions and Administrative discretion (Class Hours 15)

  1. Delegated Legislation – Meaning, Forms and Scope
  2. –Permissible limits of delegation of Legislative Powers
  3. Control over delegated legislation- Legislative Control, Judicial Control and other controls

SECTION C

Administrative Discretion and Judicial Control (Class Hours 15)

  1. Administrative Discretion: Meaning, need, exercise, abuse and control
  2. Principles of Natural Justice – Rules against bias, audi alteram partem, speaking order, reasoned decisions
  3. Judicial Review – Nature, Scope and extent of JR
  4. Judicial Review of Administrative Actions – Grounds and Proportionality

SECTION D

Grievances Redressing Mechanisms against administrative actions (Class Hours 15)

  1. Administrative Tribunals – Concept, Composition, Powers and Procedure
  2. Commission of Inquiry and Central Vigilance Commission- The Commission of Inquiry Act 1952, The Central Vigilance Commission Act 2003.
  3. Right to Information Act 2005 and Grounds of Refusal to disclose information
  4. Institution of Ombudsmen – critical analysis of the Lokpal and Lokayukta Act 2014

Tutorial activities 1 Hr /Week

  • Discussion/ debates and webinars
  • Open Book Quiz
  • Simulations
  • Landmark judgments
  • Discussion on legal dimensions of newly released movies/ serials
  • Moot courts and collaborative projects, group discussions

Text Books:

  1. P. Jain and S.N. Jain’s, Principles of Administrative Law, 2017 (7th Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  2. P. Sathe, Administrative Law, 2013 (7th Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  3. K. Takwani, Lectures on Administrative Law, 2017 (6th Edn.), Eastern Book Company

References:

  1. I.P. Massey, Administrative Law, 2017 (9th Edn.), Eastern Book Company
  2. H.W.R. Wade and C.F. Forsyth, Administrative Law, 2014, (11th Edn.), Oxford University Press
  3. Dr. J.J.R. Upadhyay, Administrative Law, 2016, Central Law Agency

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
ADMINISTRATIVE LAW LWH301 CO1 3 2 1 3 2 2 2
CO2 2 3 1 2 2 2 2
CO3 3 1 2 2 2 1 2
CO4 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 3

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Company Law (LWH302)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The Companies law has undergone major changes in recent years, especially after Companies Act, 2013. The perspective of the Act and its implementation is changing and is now, more in tune with corporate governance, inspired by various models prevailing across the world.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Advice in the matters of formation, registration of Companies in India Employability
CO2 To Apply the Company Law principles and provisions in the matters of functioning of companies in India Employability
CO3 To Counsel the companies in case of violation of provisions of companies Act Skill development
CO4 To Analyze and give suggestions for the reforms in corporate law Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Formation and Incorporation of Company   (Contact hours-15)

  1. Basic Features of Company as a form of Business Organization
  2. Kinds of Company: One Person Company, Foreign Company; Public and Private; For profit and Not for Profit etc.
  3. Process of Incorporation – Memorandum and Articles of Association
  4. Doctrines of Company Formation: Doctrine of Indoor Management; Doctrine of Ultra Vires; Doctrine of Constructive Notice

SECTION B

Corporate Finance (Contact hours-15)

  1. Prospectus and Statement in lieu of Prospectus
  2. Shares, Share Capital and Debenture; Debenture Bond
  3. Classification of Company Securities
  4. Inter-corporate Loans
  5. Role of Court to Protect Interests of Creditors and Shareholders
  6. Class Action Suits
  7. Derivative Actions

SECTION C

Corporate Governance (Contact hours-15)

  1. Distribution of Power between Members and Board
  2. Company Meetings and Procedure
  3. Directors – Types: Independent Director, Women Director
  4. Powers, Duties of Directors
  5. Corporate Social Responsibility
  6. Protection of Stakeholders: Oppression and Mismanagement; Investor Protection; Insider Trading; Corporate Fraud; Auditing Concept

SECTION D

Corporate Restructuring and Liquidation (Contact hours-15)

  1. Mergers and Acquisitions
  2. Insolvency and Bankruptcy Procedure
  3. Winding up of Company: Types of Winding up; Procedure and Powers of NCLT and NCLAT; Protection of Interests of various stakeholders

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/per week

  • Mock Registration of a company – Step by Step
  • Preparation of documents relevant for registration of Company
  • Visit to Registrar of Companies Office
  • Visit to NCLT
  • Election of Board of Directors

Text Books

  1. Avatar Singh, Companies Law, 2019, Eastern Book Company
  2. C.B. Gowar, Principles of Modern Company Law, Stevens and Sons, London
  3. Saleem Sheikh and William Rees,Corporate Governance and Corporate Control, 1995 Cavendish Publishing Ltd.
  4. Taxmann, A Comparative Study of Companies Act 2013 and Companies Act 1956

Reference Books

  1. Brenda Hanningan, Company Law,1993, Oxford University Press
  2. A. Kamal Garg, Bharat’s Corporate and Allied Laws, 2019
  3. Charles Wild and Stuart Weinstein Smith and Keenan, Company Law, 2009, Pearson Longman
  4. Lexis Nexis, Corporate Laws 2013 (Palmtop Edition)
  5. Paul L. Davis and Sarah Worthington, Gower’s Principles of Modern Company Law, 2018, Sweet and Maxwell
  6. Ramaiya, A Guide to Companies Act, Lexis Nexis

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
COMPANY LAW LWH302 CO1 3 1 3 2 2 1 2 1 2
CO2 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 2
CO3 3 1 3 3 3 3 2 3 3
CO4 2 1 2 3 3 3 2 3 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Criminal Procedure Code (LWH303)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective This paper is to give students thorough knowledge of procedural aspects of working of criminal courts and other machineries.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the overall framework of the Criminal Procedure Code, 1973. Employability
CO2 To Identify different stages of criminal proceedings and relevant authorities Employability
CO3 To Advise the client on the procedure followed in the criminal courts Skill enhancement
CO4 To Analyse the contemporary practices of criminal procedure and apply them to the case at hand Skill enhancement
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Criminal Procedure (Contact hours-15)

  1. Object and Importance ofCr.P.C
  2. Functionaries under theCr.P.C
  3. Basic Concepts: Bailable Offence, Non-Bailable Offence, Cognizable Offence, Non-cognizableOffence,Complaint,Charge,PoliceReport,Investigation,Inquiry and Trial, Summons Case, WarrantCase

SECTION B

Arrest, BailandPre-TrialProceedings(Contact hours-15)

  1. Arrest and Rights of an ArrestedPerson
  2. Provision for Bail under theCode
  3. Process to Compel Appearance ofPerson
  4. Process to Compel Production ofThings
  5. Condition Requisites for Initiation ofProceeding
  6. Complaint to Magistrate
  7. Commencement of Proceeding before Magistrate

SECTION C

Trial Proceedings (Contact hours-15)

  1. Framing of Charges and Joinder ofCharges
  2. Jurisdiction of the Criminal Courts in Inquiries andTrials
  3. Typesoftrials:SessionsTrial,WarrantTrial,SummonsTrial,SummaryTrial
  4. Judgement and Sentences under theCode
  5. Submission of Death Sentences forConfirmation
  6. General Provisions as to Inquiries andTrial
  7. Execution, Suspension, Remission and Commutation ofSentences

SECTION D

Miscellaneous (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Appeal
  2. Reference and Revision
  3. InherentPowerofCourt
  4. Transfer of CriminalCases
  5. PleaBargaining

Text Books

  1. Ratanlal and  Dhirajlal,CriminalProcedure,2017 (22nd), Lexis Nexis
  2. C. Sarkar, The Law of Criminal Procedure, 2017, Wadhawa and Co. Nagpur

References

  1. Aiyer,Mitter,LawofBails-PracticeandProcedure,2012, LawPublishers(India) Pvt.Ltd.
  2. Bare Act of Code of Criminal Procedure,1973
  3. Justice P.S. Narayana, Code of Criminal Procedure, ALT Publications
  4. N.ChandrasekharanPillai,CriminalProcedure,Eastern Book Company
  5. N.ChandrasekharanPillai,R.V.Kelkar’sLecturesonCriminalProcedure,Eastern Book Company
  6. K. Majumdar, Law of Bails, Bonds and Arrest, 2012,Orient Publication
  7. V. Ramakrishna, LawofBail,Bonds,ArrestandCustody,LexisNexis

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
CRIMINAL PROCEDURE CODE LWH303 CO1 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 1 2
CO2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 1 2
CO3 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 1 2
CO4 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 1 2

 

Course Title/ Code Law of Evidence (LWH304)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of this paper is to provide detailed understanding of the concepts and principles as involved in law of evidence, and of the provisions of the Indian Evidence Act, 1872 with the help of leading case laws.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the fundamental principles and concepts of The Indian Evidence Act, 1872 Employability
CO2 To Apply the principles regarding appraisal of evidence in court proceedings. Employability
CO3 To Advise the client on the rules applicable to the admissibility of a specific item of evidence Skill enhancement
CO4 To Conduct the examination of witnesses during court proceedings Skill enhancement
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction, Definitions and Concepts (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Brief history and principles of Law of Evidence in India
  2. Relationship between Law of Evidence and substantive laws and procedural laws
  3. Evidence – Meaning and Kinds, Hearsay Evidence
  4. Fact, Facts in issue, Relevant Fact, Evidence- Oral and Documentary, Proved, Disproved, Not proved
  5. May presume, Shall presume, Conclusive proof
  6. Theory of Relevancy- Logical Relevancy, Legal Relevancy
  7. Logically relevant facts (Sections 5-9, 11); Conspiracy (Section 10)
  8. Circumstantial Evidence and Direct Evidence

SECTION B

Relevancy and Admissibility, Admission, Confession and Dying Declaration (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Admissions (Sections 17-23)
  2. Confessions (Sections 24-30)
  3. Dying Declarations ( Section 32 (1))
  4. Opinion of Third Person (Sections 45-51)

SECTION C

On Proof (Contact Hours – 15)

  1. Method of Proof of facts
  2. Expert opinion
  3. Judicial Notice (Sections 56- 58)
  4. Oral Evidence (Sections 59- 60); Documentary Evidence (Sections 61- 78)
  5. Exclusion of oral by documentary evidence (Sections 91-92)
  6. Presumptions
  7. Doctrine of Estoppel (Sections 115- 117)
  8. Privileged Communication (Sections 122- 129)
  9. Burden of Proof (Sections 101- 106)

SECTION D

Competency and Examinations of witnesses (Contact hours– 15)

  1. Witness, Witness protection Scheme
  2. Who may testify (Section 118); Dumb witness (Section 119); Hostile witness (Section 154)
  3. Accomplice (Section 133)
  4. Examination, Cross- Examination and Re-examination
  5. Leading questions
  6. Impeaching credit of witness
  7. Refreshing memory
  8. Impact of Forensic Science
  9. Impact of social media on law of Evidence

 

Tutorial activities 1 Hr /Week

  • Discussion on leading case laws
  • Group presentation by students
  • Moot Court
  • Trial court visit
  • Visit to forensic lab

Text Book

  1. M. Monir, The Law of Evidence, 2018, Universal Law Publishing, New Delhi
  2. Ratanlal and Dhirajlal, Law of Evidence, 2017, Lexis Nexis

Reference Books

  1. Avatar Singh, Principles of The Law of Evidence, 2016, Central Law Publications
  2. Batuk Lal, Law of Evidence 2018, Central Law Agency
  3. S. C. Sarkar and M. C. Sarkar, Law of Evidence, 2016, Lexis Nexis
  4. V. P. Sarathi, Law of Evidence, 2017, Eastern Book Company

Important Cases

  1. Aghnoo Nagesia v. State of Bihar, AIR 1966 SC 119
  2. Badri Rai v. State of Bihar, AIR 1958 SC 953
  3. Bhuboni Sahu v. The King, AIR 1949 PC 257
  4. Bishwanath Prasad v. Dwarka Prasad, AIR 1974 SC 117
  5. Bodhraj v. State of J. and K.(2002) 8 SCC 45
  6. Central Bureau of Investigation v. V.C. Shukla, AIR 1998 SC 1406
  7. Dipanwita Roy v. Ronobroto Roy, AIR 2015 SC 418
  8. Goutam Kundu v. State of West Bengal, AIR 1993 SC 2295
  9. Haroon Haji Abdulla v. State of Maharastra, AIR 1975 SC 856
  10. Jayantibhai Bhenkerbhai v. State of Gujarat(2002) 8 SCC 165
  11. Khushal Rao v. State of Bombay, AIR 1958 SC 22
  12. Laxman v. State of Maharashtra (2002) 6 SCC 710
  13. C. Vergheese v. T.J. Ponnan, AIR 1970 SC 1876
  14. Mirza Akbar v. Emperor, AIR 1940 PC 176
  15. Khalid v. State of W.B.(2002) 7 SCC 334
  16. Mukesh and Others v. State for NCT of Delhi and Ors. (2017) 6 SCC 1
  17. Pulukuri Kottaya v. Emperor, AIR 1947 PC 67
  18. M. Malkani v. State of Maharashtra, AIR 1973 SC 157
  19. S. Maddanappa v. Chandramma (1965) 3 SCR 283
  20. Ram Narain v. State of U.P., AIR 1973 SC 2200 : (1973) 2 SCC 86
  21. Ravinder Singh v. State of Haryana, AIR 1975 SC 856
  22. Sanatan Gauda v. Berhampur University, AIR 1990 SC 1075
  23. State of Bihar v. Laloo Prasad (2002) 9 SCC 626
  24. State of Maharashtra v. Prafulla B. Desai (Dr.)(2003) 4 SCC 601
  25. State of U.P. v. Raj Narain, AIR 1975 SC 865
  26. Veera Ibrahim v. State of Maharashtra, AIR 1976 SC 1167

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
LAW OF EVIDENCE LWH304 CO1 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 2 2
CO2 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 2 2 2
CO3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 2 1 3
CO4 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 2 3 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code Legal Enterprises (LWH305)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Objectives To provide an overview of important laws that have a bearing on the conduct of business in India. To examine the various legal forms that a business entity can take and the relative advantages and disadvantages of each of these forms. To understand various modes of dispute resolution in business transactions
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Examine the various legal forms that a business entity can take and the relative advantages and disadvantages of each of these forms. Employability
CO2 To Recognize the most common forms of business associations, including partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations Employability
CO3 To Have a rich fund of contemporary knowledge, time tested principles, basic concepts, emerging ideas, evolving theories, latest technique, ever changing procedures and practices in the field of Law Employability
CO4 To be able to interpret laws such as intellectual property law, environmental law, Labor laws that affect the society and business. Entrepreneurship
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Business Law (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Introduction, Meaning and Scope of Business Law
  2. Laws applicable to Business
  3. Types of business-Sole Proprietorship, Limited Liability Company, Corporations Advantages, Disadvantages
  4. Partnership Act, 1932: Introduction, Nature of the Partnership, Features of Partnership, Qualities of a Partnership, Advantages, Limitations, Kinds of Partners, Partnership Deed

SECTION B

Partnership Act and Limited Liability Partnership (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Indian Partnership Act: Registration of a Partnership, Effects of registration, Effects of non – registration, Rights and Duties of Partners, Dissolution of Partnership
  2. Limited Liability Partnership

SECTION C

Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881 (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Introduction, Definition and Meaning of Negotiable Instrument, Promissory Note, bill of exchange, Cheque
  2. Parties to Negotiable Instruments
  3. Dishonor of a Negotiable Instrument
  4. Notice of dishonor
  5. Discharge of a Negotiable Instrument

SECTION D

Laws Prevailing in India (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Environment Protection Act, 1986: Background, Definitions, Environment, Environmental pollutant
  2. Intellectual Property Rights: Meaning and Scope of Patent Act, Rights of Patentee, Infringement, Remedies, Trademarks, Copyright
  3. Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999: Difference between FERA and FEMA, Scope of FEMA, Salient Features and Provisions of FEMA, Offences under FEMA
  4. Labour Laws in India: Overview of Labour Laws, Introduction to Minimum Wages Act, 1948
  5. Micro Small And Medium Enterprises Development Act, 2006: Classification of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises, Salient Features of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises Act, Reservation Policy

Text Books

  1. Ravinder Kumar, Legal Aspects of Business, 2016 (4th), Cengage Learning
  2. D. Kapoor, Business Law, 2019, Sultan Chand and Sons
  3. Sen and Mitra, Commercial Law, 2018 (27th), The World Press

Reference Books

  1. Beatty Samuelson Abril, Introduction to Business Law, 2018 (6th Edn.), Cengage Learning
  2. Richard A Mann and Barry S Roberts, Business Law and the Regulation of Business, 2016 (12th Edn.), Cengage Learning
  3. Robert W Emerson, Business Law, 2015 (6th Edn.), Barrons Educational Series

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
LEGAL ENTERPRISES LWH305 CO1 1 3 2 2 3 2 1 1 1
CO2 1 2 2 1 2 3 1 2 2
CO3 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2
CO4 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code STRATEGIC  MANAGEMENT (LWH314)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-0-0)
Objectives To develop understanding of the concept of strategy, strategic management process and techniques among the students, to facilitate them in appreciating business problems and providing strategic solutions.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Understand the concepts of Business policy, strategy and tactics. Employability
CO2 Analyze the internal and external environment of business. Employability
CO3 Gain insights into the nature and process of strategic analysis and choice. Employability
CO4 Develop awareness and insights on how strategy is implemented and issues faced. Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Strategic Management (Lectures– 15)

  1. Overview and key terms; Strategic thinking Vs Strategic management Vs Strategic planning; Strategy and Tactic; Vision, Mission, Objectives and Strategy
  2. Business Policy and Strategy
  3. Strategic Management- Basic elements and Model
  4. Strategic decision-making process
  5. Strategic Management- Merits and demerits

SECTION B

Strategic Analysis and Choice (Lectures– 15)

  1. Environmental scanning-Internal and External
  2. Core Competencies and Competitive advantage
  3. The Nature of Strategy Analysis and Choice
  4. Porter’s Five Forces Model, Value Chain Analysis
  5. Strategy formulation: The Input Stage; The Matching Stage (SWOT and BCG); The Decision Stage

SECTION C

Strategy Implementation (Lectures– 15)

  1. The Nature of Strategy Implementation
  2. Resource Allocation.
  3. Designing organizational structures for strategic implementation
  4. Issues in implementation
  5. Managing Resistance to Change
  6. Importance of culture and leadership
  7. Type of Strategies

SECTION D

Strategic evaluation and control (Lectures– 15)

  1. Understanding strategic evaluation and control.
  2. Types of Control.
  3. Techniques of strategic evaluation and control.
  4. Strategic Leadership

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/per week

  • Case Study analysis
  • Quiz
  • Assignment/Group Discussion
  • Presentation on emerging trends

Text Books:

  1. Azar Kazmi, Business Policy and Strategic Management, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi
  2. Upendra Kachru, Strategic Management Concepts and Cases, Excel Publications.
  3. Fred R. David and Forest R. David, Strategic Management: A Competitive Advantage Approach, Concepts and Cases, 2018 (16th ), Pearson
  4. A. Pearce and R.B. Robinson, Strategic Management: Formulation, Implementation and Control, 2008 (10th Edn.), McGraw Hill
  5. S. Gupta, Business Policy and Strategic Management, Himalaya Publishing House

Reference Books:

  1. Arthur A. Thompson Jr. and A. J. Strickland, Strategic Management-Concepts and Cases, McGraw Hill
  2. Lawrence R. Jauch and William F. Glueck, Business Policy and Strategic Management ,McGraw Hill Series in Management)
  3. Ranjan Das, Crafting the Strategy: Concepts and Cases in Strategic Management, Tata McGraw Hill
  4. Gerry Johnson and Kevan Scholes, Exploring Corporate Strategies, 2010 (9th),PHI
  5. R. M. Srivastava, Management Policy and Strategic Management, 2017 (3rd Edn.), Himalaya Publishing House

Scheme of Evaluation:

  • Internal Assessment – 40 Marks
  • T1/Begin –term Exam- 30 Marks
  • T2/ Mid-term Exam – 30 Marks
  • T3/ End-term Exam – 100 Marks

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
 

STRATEGIC  MANAGEMENT

LWH314 CO1 1 2 1 3 1 1 3 2 3 2 1 1
CO2 1 3 1 3 1 1 3 2 3 3 1 1
CO3 1 3 1 3 1 1 3 2 3 3 1 1
CO4 1 2 1 3 1 1 3 2 3 3 1 1

 

 

 

SEMESTER- VI

Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type(DepttCore/Allied/Elective/Audit) Structure Credits
  L T P  
LWH308 Civil Procedure Code and Limitation Act LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH309 Labour Laws LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH310 Property Law LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH311 Clinic- I (ADR) LAW Core 2 3 0 4
LWS312 Philosophy LAW Core 4 1 0 4
LWH315 Management Information System Management Core 4 1 0 4
Total(L-T-P/Credits) 24 8 0 24

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Civil Procedure Code and Limitation Act (LWH308)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The paper will focus on the civil procedures followed in instituting a suit. The students will be familiarized with certain important concepts, and practical skill development activity will provide insights into the actual working of the court procedures.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Differentiate between substantive and procedural laws and explain the basic Concepts of Civil Procedure Skill Development
CO2 To Counsel the client on the procedures of the court in civil matters including limitation period Skill Development
CO3 To Draft the pleadings by applying the basic principles of civil procedure Skill Development
CO4 To Represent the parties before the appropriate forum in civil matters Skill Development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Contact hours-15)

  1. Definitions: Decree, Judgment, Order, Foreign Court, Foreign Judgment, Mesne-Profits, Affidavit, Suit, Plaint, Written Statement
  2. Important Concepts: Res Sub-Judice, Resjudicata, Restitution, Caveat
  3. Inherent Powers of Courts

SECTION B

Initial Steps in a Suit (Contact hours-15)

  1. Jurisdiction and Place of Suing
  2. Institution of Suit
  3. Appearance and Non-Appearance of Parties
  4. Framing of Issues and Evidence

SECTION C

Interim Orders, Appeal, Review, Revision (Contact hours-15)

  1. Execution of Judgment and Decree
  2. Commissions, Receiver, Temporary Injunctions, Summary Procedure
  3. Suits by Indigent persons, Inter-pleader Suit
  4. Appeals from Original Decree, Appeals from Appellate Decrees
  5. General Provisions relating to Appeals, Review, Revision

SECTION D

Law of Limitation

  1. Limitation of Suits, Appeal and Applications
  2. Period of Limitation, Continuous Running of Time
  3. Effect of Sufficient cause for not preferring appeal or making an application within a period of Limitation
  4. Legal Disabilities. Computation of period of limitation and exclusion of time in legal proceeding

Text Books

  1. K. Takwani, Code of Civil Procedure (with Limitation Act, 1963), 2018 (8th Edn.), Eastern Book Company

References

  1. ACT: The Civil Procedure Code, 1908
  2. ACT: The Limitation Act, 1963
  3. Dinshaw Fardauzi Mulla, Mulla’s Code of Civil Procedure, 2017 (19th Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  4. M.P. Tandon, Code of Civil Procedure, 2018, Allahabad Law Agency
  5. M.R.Malik, Ganguly’s Civil Court Practice and Procedure, 2016, Eastern Law House

Important Cases

  1. K. Narayana Pillai v. Parameswaran Pillai, (2000) 1 SCC 712
  2. Bhanu Kumar Jain v. Archana Kumar, AIR 2005 SC 626
  3. Bharat Nidhi Ltd. v. Megh Raj Mahajan, AIR 1967 Del. 22
  4. A. Balakrishnan v. Commissioner Corporation of Madras, AIR 2003 Mad. 170
  5. Chunilal V. Mehta v. Century Spinning and Manufacturing Co. Ltd., AIR 1962 SC1314
  6. Dalip Kaur v. Major Singh, AIR 1996 P and H 107
  7. Dalpat Kaur v.Prahlad Singh, AIR 1993 SC 276
  8. Gill and Co. v. Bimla Kumari, 1986 RLR 370
  9. Gundaji Satwaji Shinde v. Ram Chandra Bhikaji Joshi, AIR 1979 SC 653
  10. Haridas Das v. Smt. Usha Rani Banik, 2006 (3) SCALE 287
  11. Iftikhar Ahmed v. Syed Meharban Ali, AIR 1974 SC 749
  12. Indian Bank v. Maharashtra State Cooperative Marketing Federation Ltd, AIR 1998 SC 1952
  13. Jai Jai Ram Manohar Lal v. National Building Material Supply Co., AIR 1969 S.C. 1267
  14. Koppi Setty v.Ratnam v.Pamarti Venka 2009 RLR 27 (NSC)
  15. M/s Ganesh Trading Co. v. Moji Ram, AIR 1978 SC 484
  16. M/s Mechalec Engineers and Manufacturers v. Basic Equipment Corporation, AIR 1977 SC 577
  17. Monohar Lal v. Seth Hira Lal AIR 1962 SC 527
  18. ONGC Ltd. v. State Bank of India, AIR 2000 SC 2548
  19. Rajni Kumar v. Suresh Kumar Malhotra, 2003 (3) SCALE 434
  20. Saleem Bhai v. State of Maharashtra,AIR 2003 SC 759
  21. Sangram Singhv. Election Tribunal,AIR 1955 SC 425
  22. Santosh Kumar v. Bhai Mool Singh, AIR 1958 S.C. 321
  23. Shivajirao Nilangekar Patil v. Dr. Mahesh Madhav Gosavi, AIR 1987 SC 294
  24. State of U.P. v. Nawab Hussain, AIR 1977 SC 1680
  25. Union Bank of India v. Khader International Construction(2001) 5 SCC 2
  26. Narsimha Rao v.Y Venkata Lakshmi (1991) 2 SCR 821

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Civil Procedure Code and Limitation Act LWH308 CO1 3 2 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 1
CO2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2
CO3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 1 2
CO4 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 1 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code Labour Laws (LWH309)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives This paper focuses on various aspect of management of labour relation and dispute settlement bodies and techniques.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain basic concepts relating to labour laws including workman, industry and industrial dispute Employability
CO2 To Counsel the clients with respect to the labour authorities and procedures Employability
CO3 To Opine the clients on the relevant provisions relating to the social security in general and workmen compensation Act in particular Employability
CO4 To Represent the parties before the appropriate forum on the matter falling under Trade Union Act, Industrial Dispute Act, Workmen Compensation Act and Factories Act Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Industrial Relation and Labour Policy in India (Contact hours- 15)

  1. Trade Union Act, 1926  (Labour  Management  Relation); History and Development. of Trade
  2. Union Movement, Registration of Trade Union
  3. Rights and Liabilities of Registered Trade Union, Penalties and procedure
  4. Collective Bargaining-Process, Merits and Demerits

SECTION B

Industrial Disputes and Resolution (Contact hours-15)

  1. Scope of Industry, Workmen, Employers
  2. Industrial Disputes Authorities under the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947
  3. Procedure, Power and Duties of Authorities, Reference of Disputes to Boards
  4. Labour Courts, Tribunals, Strike, Lock Out, Lay Off, Retrenchment and Closure
  5. Unfair Labour Practices, Penalties, Offences by Companies etc.

SECTION C

Workmen’s Compensation Act, 1923 (Sec.1-10, 12, 14, 14A, 17 and 20) (Contact hours-15)

  1. Conceptual frame work of Social Security-Evolution and concept of Social Security

b.Scheme of Social Security

  1. Workmen’s Compensation Act, 1923: Definitions, Aims and Object, Liability of Employer
  2. Notional Extension and Defences, Compensation, Compensation when due-Penalty for default
  3. Contracting Out (Sec.17), Appointment and Powers of Commissioner (Sec.19-31)

SECTION D

The Factories Act, 1948 (Contact hours-15)

  1. Approval, Licensing and Registration of Factories
  2. Concept of ‘Factory’, ‘Manufacturing Process’, ‘Worker’, and ‘Occupier’
  3. General Duties of Occupier
  4. Measures to be taken in Factories for Health, Safety and Welfare of Workers
  5. Working Hours of Adult
  6. Employment of Young Person and Children
  7. Annual Leave with Wages
  8. Additional Provisions Regulating Employment of Women in Factory

Text Books:

  1. R.N Sinha andOthers,Industrial Relations, Trade Unions and Labour Legislation,2017,Pearson,
  2. C.Srivastava,IndustrialRelationsandLabourLaw,VikasPublishingHouse, 2012 (6th Edn.)
  3. Taxmann’s Labour Laws, 2019, Taxmann Publications

References:

  1. The Apprentices Act, 1961
  2. The Building and Other Construction Workers (Regulation of Employment and Conditions of Services) Act, 1996.
  3. The Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986
  4. The Contract Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act, 1970
  5. The Employees’ Family Pension Scheme, 1971
  6. The Employees’ Provident Funds and Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1952
  7. The Equal Remuneration Act, 1976
  8. The Factories Act, 1948
  9. The Industrial Disputes Act, 1947
  10. The Industrial Employment (Standing Orders) Act, 1946
  11. The Labour Welfare Fund Laws (Amendment) Act, 1987
  12. The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961
  13. The Minimum Wages Act, 1948
  14. The Payment of Bonus Act, 1965
  15. The Payment of Wages Act, 1936
  16. The Trade Unions Act, 1926
  17. The Workmen’s Compensation Act, 1923
  18. Chaturvedi, Labour and Industrial Law, 2016, Central Law Agency
  19. Simon Honeyballand John Bowers, Text Book on Labour Law, 2006, Blackstone, London
  20. K.M.Pillai, Labour and Industrial Laws, 2017, Allahabad Law Agency
  21. P.L. Malik, Industrial Law, 2017, Eastern Book Company
  22. V.G.Goswami, Labour and Industrial Laws, 2015, Central Law Agency

Important Cases

  1. Sundarambal v. Government of Goa, Daman and Diu, AIR 1988SC 1700
  2. Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board v. A. Rajappa, AIR 1978 SC 548
  3. Dharangadhra Chemical Works Ltd. v. State of Saurashtra, AIR 1957 SC 264
  4. Essorpe Mills Ltd. v. P.O.; Labour Court (2008) 7 SCC 594
  5. R. Adyanthaya v. Sandoz (India) Ltd. (1994) 5 SCC 737
  6. In Re Inland Steam Navigation Worker’s Union, AIR 1936 Cal59
  7. H. Jadhav v. Forbes Gokak Ltd. (2005) 3 SCC 202
  8. Management of Chandramalai Estate v. Its Workmen, AIR 1960 SC 902
  9. Municipal Corporation of Delhi v. Female Workers (Muster Roll) AIR 2000 SC 1274 : (2000) 3 SCC 224
  10. Punjab Land Development and Reclamation Corporation Ltd. v. Presiding Officer, Labour Court (1990) 3 SCC 682
  11. S. Ruikar v. Emperor, AIR 1935 Nag. 149
  12. Rangaswami v. Registrar of Trade Unions, AIR 1962 Mad. 231
  13. Rohtas Industries Staff Union v. State of Bihar, AIR 1963 Pat. 170
  14. Rohtas Industries v. Its Union, AIR 1976 S.C. 425
  15. State of U.P. v. Jai Bir Singh (2005) 5 SCC 1
  16. Syndicate Bank v. K. Umesh Nayak (1994) 5 SCC 572
  17. The Tamil Nad Non-Gazetted Government Officers’ Union, Madras v. The Registrar of Trade Unions, AIR 1962 Mad. 234
  18. The Workmen of Fire Stone Tyre and Rubber Co. Pvt. Ltd. v. Fire Stone Tyre and Rubber Co. Pvt. Ltd.(1976) 3 SCC 819:AIR 1976 SC 1775
  19. P. State Brassware Corporation Ltd. v. Uday Narain Pandey (2006) 1 SCC 479
  20. Workmen of Dimakuchi Tea Estate v. Management of Dimakuchi Tea Estate, AIR 1958 SC 353

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Labour Laws LWH309 CO1 3 2 2 1 3 2 1 1
CO2 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 2
CO3 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 1 2
CO4 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 1 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code Property Law (LWH310)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The objective of this paper is to focus on concept and classification of property as well as principles governing transfer of immovable property.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Differentiate between various types of movable and immovable property Employability
CO2 To Explain the forms of transfer including sale, mortgage, gift and lease and related rights and obligations Employability
CO3 To Advise on the procedure relating to transfer of immovable property. Employability
CO4 To Draft basic documents relating to various forms of transfer of property. Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Concept of Property and General Principles Relating to Transfer of Property (Contact hours – 15)

  1. Concept of Property:Distinction betweenMovableandImmovableProperty
  2. Conditions RestrictingTransfer
  3. Definition of Transfer ofProperty
  4. Transferable and Non-TransferableProperty
  5. Transfer to an Unborn Person and Rule againstPerpetuity
  6. Vested and Contingentinterest
  7. Rule ofElection

SECTION B

General Principles Governing Transfer of Immovable Property(Contact hours– 15)

  1. Transfer by OstensibleOwner
  2. Rule of Feeding Grant byEstoppel
  3. RuleofLispendens
  4. FraudulentTransfer
  5. Rule of Part Performance
  6. ActionableClaim

SECTION C

SpecificTransfers–I(Contact hours –15)

Sale, Mortgage and Charge

  1. Definitions: Mortgage, Mortgagor, Mortgagee, Mortgage Money and Mortgage Deed
  2. Types of mortgage: Simple Mortgage; Mortgage by Conditional Sale; Usufructuary Mortgage; English Mortgage; Mortgage by Deposit of Title Deeds; Anomalous Mortgage
  3. Rights and Liabilities of Mortgagor and Mortgagee
  4. Marshalling and Contribution
  5. Subrogation
  6. Charge: Meaning and differences from Mortgage

SECTION D

SpecificTransfer–II(Contact hours –15)

Sale, Gift and Lease

  1. Sale: Definitions, Rights and Liabilities of the Buyer and Seller
  2. Marshalling by subsequent purchaser
  3. Gift: Meaning, Suspension and Revocation of Gift, Onerous Gift, universal done
  4. Difference between Gift under Muslim law and gift under transfer of property.
  5. Lease: Meaning, Essentials, Types, Registration of lease when required?
  6. Difference between lease and license, difference between lease and mortgage

Text Books

  1. Mulla, Transfer of Property Act, 2013, Lexis Nexis
  2. Poonam Pradhan Saxena, Property Law,2011, Lexis Nexis

References

  1. The Transfer of Property Act, 1882
  2. AvtarSingh,TransferofPropertyAct, 2012, UniversalPublishing Pvt Ltd.
  3. JamesCharlesSmith,Property andSovereignty(Law,PropertyandSociety), 2013, Ashgate
  4. SandeepBhalla, Digest of Cases on Transfer of Property in India,2012 (2nd),Eastern Book Company

Important Cases

  1. Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation v. Haji Abdul Gafur Haji Hussenbhai, AIR 1971 SC 1201
  2. Associated Hotels of India v. R.N. Kapoor, AIR 1959 SC 1262
  3. V. D’Souza v. Antonio Fausto Fernandes, AIR 1989 SC 1816
  4. Bamdev Panigrahi v. Monorama Raj, AIR 1974 AP 226
  5. Dalip Kaur v. Jeewan Ram, AIR 1996 PandH 158
  6. Delta International ltd. v. Shyam Sunder Ganeriwalla, AIR 1999 SC 2607
  7. Duncans Industries Ltd.v. State of U.P. (2000)1 SCC 633
  8. Govinda Pillai Gopala Pillai v. Aiyyappan Krishnan, AIR 1957 Ker.10
  9. Jayaram Mudaliar v. Ayyaswamy, AIR 1973 SC 569: (1972) 2 SCC 200
  10. Jumma Masjid, Mercara v. Kodimaniandra Deviah, AIR1962 SC 847:1962 Supp (1) SCR 554
  11. Muniswamy v. K. Venkataswamy, AIR 2001 Kant.246
  12. Kartar Singh v. Harbans Kaur (1994) 4 SCC 730
  13. Kartari v. Kewal Krishan, AIR 1972 HP117
  14. Kenneth Solomon v. Dan Singh Bawa, AIR 1986 Del 1
  15. Kumar Harish Chandra Singh Deo v. Bansidhar Mohanty, AIR 1965 SC1738: (1966) 1 SCR 153
  16. L .Abdul Jabbar Sahib v. H. Venkata Sastri, AIR 1969 SC 1147: (1969) 1 SCC 573
  17. Manohar Shivram Swami v. Mahadeo Guruling Swamy, AIR 1988 Bom 116
  18. Mohar Singh v. Devi Charan, AIR 1988 SC 1365: (1988) 3 SCC 63
  19. Muhammad Raza v. Abbas Bandi Bibi, (1932) I.A. 236
  20. Ramaiah v. Nagaraj S, AIR 2001 Kant.395
  21. Padarath Halwai v. Ram Narain, AIR 1915 PC 21
  22. Quality Cut Pieces v. M. Laxmi, AIR 1986 Bom 359
  23. Kempraj v. Burton Sonand Co, AIR 1970 SC 1872: (1969) 2 SCC 594
  24. Rajeh Kanta Roy v. Shanti Debi, AIR 1957 SC 255:1957 SCR 77
  25. Ram Baran v. Ram Mohit, AIR 1967 SC 744: (1967) 1 SCR 293
  26. Ram Newaz v. Nankoo, AIR 1926 All 283
  27. Rosher v. Rosher (1884) 26 Ch D 801
  28. Samir Kumar Chatterjee v. Hirendra Nath Ghosh, AIR 1992 Cal 129
  29. Sangar Gagu Dhula v. Shah Laxmiben Tejshi, AIR 2001 Guj.329
  30. 32 Shantabai v. State of Bombay, AIR 1958 SC 532: (1959) SCR 265
  31. Shivdev Singh v. Sucha Singh, AIR 2000 SC 1935: (2000) 4 SCC 326
  32. Sri Jagannath Mahaprabhu v. Pravat Chandra Chatterjee, AIR 1992 Ori.47
  33. State of Orissa v. Titaghur Paper Mills Company Limited, AIR 1985 SC 1293: (1985) Supp SCC 280
  34. Supreme General Films Exchange Ltd v. Maharaja Sir Brijnath Singhji Deo, AIR 1975 SC 1810
  35. Tila Bewa v. Mana Bewa, AIR 1962 Ori.130
  36. Tulk v. Moxhay (1848) 2 Ch.774
  37. N.Sarin v. Ajit Kumar Poplai, AIR 1966 SC 432: (1966) 1SCR 349
  38. Zoroastrian Co-operative Housing Society Ltd. v. District Registrar, Co-op. Societies (2005) 5 SCC 632

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 Po7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Property Law LWH310 CO1 3 1 3 2 2 3 1 2
CO2 2 2 3 1 2 2 1 3
CO3 3 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2
CO4 1 3 1 2 3 2 2 1 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Clinic-I (ADR) (LWH311)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (2-3-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of the paper is to give the students an insight into the processes of arbitration, conciliation, mediation and negotiation. It discusses legal aid. It also covers the Legal Services Authorities Act, 1987.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Compare various methods of conflict resolution under national and international systems Skill development
CO2 To Classify the types of arbitration and explain their scope Skill development
CO3 To Undertake matters falling within the purview of the Arbitration and Conciliation Act; Skill development
CO4 To Provide representation to the clients for free legal aid before appropriate Legal Services Authorities Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to ADR

  • Introduction to basic concepts
  • Introduction to ADR methods (negotiation, conciliation, mediation and arbitration)
  • Similaritites and differences between the ADR methods
  • Conventional method of dispute settlement
  • Shortcomings of conventional methods/ need for ADR
  • Advantages of ADR methods over conventional methods

 

SECTION B

ARBITRATION

  1. Basic concepts- arbitrability, party autonomy, finality
  2. Types of arbitration – domestic arbitration and international arbitration
  3. Arbitration agreement – essentials, Doctrine of Severability
  4. Arbitral Tribunal – composition, jurisdiction, competence, powers
  5. Conduct of Arbitral Proceedings – equal treatment, rules of procedure, seat and venue, written submissions
  6. Termination of proceedings – Arbitral Award, enforcement, challenge of award

SECTION C

Mediation

  1. Basic Concepts, Importance and Advantage
  2. Essential elements, Characteristics and Stages of Mediation
  3. Approaches to Mediation – Facilitative, Evaluative and Transformative Mediation
  4. Qualities, Skills and Role of the Mediator
  5. Conducting Effective Mediation – Decision Making and Problem-Solving Tactics
  6. Drafting Mediated Agreements and Enforcement
  7. Mediation Laws in India- Sec 89 and other provisions of CPC 1908, Model Civil Procedure ADR and Mediation Rules, 2003 (Parts I and II), The Commercial Courts (Pre-Institution Mediation and Settlement) Rules 2018 (the PIMS Rules), The Consumer Protection Act 2019
  8. International Mediation Ecosystem- UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Mediation and International Settlement Agreements Resulting from Mediation, 2018, United Nations Convention on International Settlement Agreements Resulting from Mediation, 2018 (Singapore Convention on Mediation), UNCITRAL Notes on Mediation (2021)

SECTION D

 

Conciliation

  1. What is conciliation?
  2. How is it done?
  3. When is it used?
  4. Advantages
  5. Difference between Arbitration, Mediation and Conciliation

Negotiation

  1. Introduction
  2. Various phases in Negotiation
  3. Qualities of a Good Negotiator
  4. The Seven Pillars of Negotiation Wisdom
  5. Winner’s Curse
  6. Interest based Bargaining
  7. BATNA and WATNA- Integrative and Distributive Negotiation

 

Text Books:

  1. Avtar Singh, Law of Arbitration and Conciliation, 2018 (11th) (Eastern Book Company)
  2. Legal Services Authority Act, 1987
  3. The Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996

Reference Books:

  1. K. Bansal, Law of International Commercial Arbitration, 2012, Lexis Nexis
  2. P. Saraf and M. Jhunjhunwala, Law of Arbitration and Conciliation, 2009 (5th Edn.), Snow white, Mumbai
  3. Basu Majumdar, Law of Arbitration, 2011, Universal
  4. Commentary on The Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 2017 (2nd), Universal
  5. G. Merrills, International Dispute Settlement, 2011 (5th Edn.), Cambridge University Press
  6. Madhusudan Saharay, Textbook on Arbitration and Conciliation , 4th, Lexis Nexis
  7. C. Rao and William Sheffield, Alternative Disputes Resolution- What it is and How it works?, 2015, Universal

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Clinic-I (ADR) LWH311 CO1 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 1
CO2 3 1 2 2 1 3 2 2 1
CO3 3 2 3 3 3 3 2 2
CO4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code Philosophy (LWH312)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The students should get familiar with various approaches to law and legal processes. They should be able to appreciate dynamic character of the law and legal systems particularly in the context of political history of thesociety. Endeavour should be madeto develop among students critical thinking about the law, legal system and legal processes. The students should be in position to appreciate how diverse approaches to law influence decision-making in judicial courts.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Identify and explain the theoretical underpinnings of law and legal system Skill Development
CO2 To Differentiate between various schools of legal philosophy Skill Development
CO3 To Establish the relationship between various foundational concepts inter se Skill Development
CO4 To Describe the basic elements of dominant theories of justice, in particular the ones given by John Rawls and Amartya Sen Skill Development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Contact hours-15)

  1. Meaning, Content and Nature of Jurisprudence
  2. Classical Schools of Jurisprudence: Hindu and Islamic
  3. Analytical Positivism

SECTION B

Schools of Jurisprudence (Contact hours-15)

  1. Historical Schools of Jurisprudence
  2. Sociological Schools of Jurisprudence
  3. Economic and Realist School of Jurisprudence

SECTION C

Legal Concepts (Contact hours-15)

  1. Rights and Duties
  2. Personality
  3. Property, Possession and Ownership

SECTION D

Theories and Concepts of Justice (Contact hours-15)

  1. Concepts of Natural and Social Justice
  2. Theories of Justice: Rawls, Fuller,Nozick
  3. Indian Concepts of Justice: Constitution Imperatives, Amartya Sen’s The Idea of Justice

Text Books:

  1. Raymond Wacks, Understanding Jurisprudence: An Introduction to Legal Theory,2009,Oxford University Press
  2. EdgarBodenheimer,Jurisprudence, 1974(Revised Edn.), Harvard University Press

References:

  1. Amartya Sen, The Idea of Justice, 2011, Penguin
  2. ChandranKukathasandPhilipPettit,Rawls:ATheoryofJusticeanditsCritics, 1990, Stanford University Press
  3. Granville Austin,Indian Constitution: The Cornerstone of a Nation, 2007, Oxford University Press
  4. Jonathan Wolff andRobert Nozick, Property, Justice, and the MinimalState, 1991, Stanford University Press
  5. Patrick John Fitzgerald (ed.), Salmond on Jurisprudence, 2016, Sweet and Maxwell
  6. W.M. Dias, Jurisprudence, 2013, Lexis Nexis

 

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Philosophy LWH312 CO1 2 3 3 2
CO2 2 1 3 3
CO3 1 1 3 2 2 2 3
CO4 1 3 2 3 2

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code

Management Information System (LWH315)

Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-0-0)
Objectives The objective of this course is to acquaint the students with basics of Management Information System that would deal with enterprises and organizations
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entrepreneurship)
CO1 Describe the role of information technology and information systems in business and Reproduce a   working
knowledge of concepts and terminology related to information technology
Employability
CO2 Interpret how to use information technology to solve business problems and the impact of information
systems in society
Employability
CO3 Analyse and synthesize business information and systems to facilitate evaluation of strategic alternatives. Employability
CO4 To provide the theoretical models used in database management systems to answer business questions. Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

 

SECTION A

Concept, Role and Importance of MIS, MIS and Decision Making Concepts, Herbert Simon Model of Decision Making

Concept of Information, Classification of Information, Value of Information, MIS and Information Concepts

SECTION B

 

Concept of Systems Analysis and Design (SAD), Need for Systems Analysis, the Process of SAD, MIS and System Analysis Planning, Designing, and Implementation of MIS, Testing

SECTION C

Decision Support Systems: Concept of Philosophy of DSS, Decision Support Systems – Overview, Components and Classification, Steps in constructing a DSS, Enterprise Management System: Introduction, Structure of ERP, Supply Chain Management

SECTION D

The Concept of DBMS and RDBMS, Role of DBA, Layered architecture, Key concept, ER Modeling, Case study

Text Book:

1.Murdic, R.G. and Ross J.E., Information System for Modern Management (PHI:New Delhi)

Reference Books:

1.Laudon and Laundon, Management Information System (Pearson : New Delhi)

2.Goyel, Management Information System (Macmillan: New Delhi)

Scheme of Evaluation:

  • Internal Assessment – 40 Marks
  • T1/Begin –term Exam- 30 Marks
  • T2/ Mid-term Exam – 30 Marks
  • T3/ End-term Exam – 100 Marks

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Management Information System LWH315 CO1 2 3 2 1 1 1 3 2 1 1
CO2 2 3 3 2 1 2 3 3 1 2
CO3 2 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 1 2
CO4 2 3 3 2 1 2 3 2 1 2

 

SEMESTER- VII

Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type(Deptt Allied/Core/ Elective/Audit) Structure Credits
L T P  
LWH401 Land Laws Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH402 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS LAW-I Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH403 Clinic-II (Drafting, Pleading and Conveyancing) Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH404 Law on Mergers and Acquisitions Law Elective 4 1 0 4
LWH405 Competition Law Law Elective 4 1 0 4
LWH 406 Juvenile Justice Law Elective 4 1 0 4
LWH 407 Criminology, Victimology and Penalogy Law Elective 4 1 0 4
FLS103 French-I CFL Core 2 0 0 2
FLS102 German-I CFL Core 2 0 0 2
FLS101 Spanish-I CFL Core 2 0 0 2
LWO409 Internship Viva-III Law Core 0 0 0 1
  Total (L-T-P/Credits) 32 7 0 35

 

DETAILED SYLLABUS

Course Title/ Code Land Laws (LWH401)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Describe of Land Reforms in India and related Constitutional and legal framework Employability
CO2 To Interpret and apply the provisions of Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement Act, 2013 to given situations Employability
CO3 To Apply the provisions of Delhi Rent Control Act and counsel the clients on the matters of rent and tenancy Skill development
CO4 To Apply the provisions of Haryana ceiling on Land Holding Act, 1972 and counsel the clients on the matters of revenue and tenancy. Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Land Reforms (Contact hours-15)

  1. History of land related laws in India
  2. Land Reforms in India
  3. Agrarian Reforms in Pre-Independence India
  4. Constitutional Imperatives and Objectives relating to Agrarian Reforms: Constitutional provisions and Amendments

SECTION B

Urban Development and Regulations (Contact hours-15)

  1. Urbanization: Issues and Perspectives
  2. Land Acquisition Act, 2013
  3. Determination of Social impact and Public purpose
  4. Urban Development Institutions in NCR: DDA, HUDA, NOIDA

SECTION C

Delhi Rent Control Act, 1995 and Model Tenancy Act, 2021  (Contact hours-15)

  1. Historical Background of Rent Control in Delhi
  2. Definitions
  3. Rent and Repair of Premises
  4. Grounds of Eviction
  5. Dispute Settlement Mechanisms

SECTION D

Haryana Ceiling on Land Holding Act, 1972 (Contact hours-15)

  1. Definitions
  2. Permissible Area
  3. Exemptions
  4. Ceiling on Lands etc.

Haryana Rent Control ACT, 1973: Definition (SS 1-4), Rights and Duties of Tenants, Rights and Duties of Landlords, Grounds of Ejectment of Tenants

Haryana Real Estate (Regulation and Development) Rules, 2017

Real estate project, Details to be published on the website of the authority, Real estate regulatory authority

Real estate appellate tribunal, Offences and penalties ,  Filing of complaint with the authority and The adjudicating officer

 

Tutorial Activities

  • Research Paper/Project work
  • Preparation of Rent Deed/ Notice of Eviction
  • Visit to Land Acquisition and Rehabilitation Sites
  • Visit to Rent Controller Office

Text andReferences:

  1. Jaspsal Singh, Delhi Rent Control Act, Pioneer Books, 2007(6th ed.)
  2. N.K. Acharya, Commentary on the Right to Fair Compensation and Transparency in Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement Act, 2013, Asia Law House, 2014.
  3. Haryana Ceiling on Land Holding Act, 1972
  4. Haryana Panchayati Raj Act, 1994
  5. Harshali Chowdhary, Punjab and Haryana Land Laws, 2016, Cenrtral Law Publication
  6. Neeti Kaul, Land Laws in Punjab and Haryana, 2014, Central Law Publication
  7. M.L. Upadhyaya, Law, Poverty and Development, 2005, Taxmann Allied Publishers Pvt. Ltd

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Land Laws LWH401 CO1 3 2 3 2 3
CO2 3 3 3 3 2 3 3
CO3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3
CO4 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 3

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Intellectual Property Rights Law-I (LWH402)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of this course is to acquaint the students with basics of intellectual property rights (Trademark, patent, trade secret and integrated circuit) with special reference to Indian law and practice.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Categorize different types of Intellectual Properties. Employability
CO2 To Recognize the crucial role of intellectual property (Trademark, patent, trade secret ) played in different industries. Employability
CO3 To Identify the IP infringements and the remedies available to the IP owner. Skill development
CO4 To Represent the parties in the matters of IPR disputes in and outside the court of law Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Intellectual Property

  1. General Principles of Intellectual Property Rights
  2. Nature and Concept of IPR, WTO/TRIPs Brief evolution of IPR and its importance in present context
  3. Types of Intellectual Property, Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights (Art. 9-39 TRIPs), by various national laws
  4. Abuse of Intellectual Property—Concept
  5. Brief on International legal instruments relating to IPR Paris Convention, 1883 and TRIPs Reciprocity and Priority, Concept of Minimum Standards, Concept of National Treatment, Concept of Most Favoured Nation (MFN)

Trademarks (The Trademarks Act, 1999)

  1. Introduction to Trademarks Law
  2. Brief Introduction to related International Treaties and Conventions
  3. Definitions, Registration of Trademarks, Procedure, Grounds of Refusal and Well Known Trademarks
  4. Passing Off, Infringement and Exceptions to Infringement Actions, Remedies

 

SECTION B

Trademarks- continued

e.. Assignment and Licensing

f.Trademark Disputes over Domain Name

g.Unconventional Trademarks

h.Trade Mark Dilution and Contemporary Areas

 

Geographical Indications (The Geograhical Indications of Goods (Registration and Protection) Act, 1999)

  1. Definitions, Concept of Indication of source, Geographical Indication and appellations of origin, Community Right
  2. Kinds of Geographical Indications and Registration Procedure for Registration, Grounds for Refusal of Registration of GI’s, Registration of homonymous Geographical Indications, Duration of protection and renewal
  3. Infringement, penalties and remedies
  4. Conflict of GI’s with Trade marks

SECTION C

Patent (The Patents Act, 1970)

  1. Introduction to Patent Law
  2. Brief Introduction to related International Treaties and Conventions
  3. Definitions
  4. Criteria for Patents,
  5. Patentable Inventions, Non-Patentable Inventions
  6. Procedure for Filing Patent Application
  7. Revocation of Patent

SECTION D

Patent (The Patents Act, 1970)- Continued

  1. Licensing, Compulsory Licensing
  2. Parallel Import
  3. Rights of Patentee, Patent Infringement and Defences

Trade Secret

  1. Confidential Information/Trade Secret Law

(i) Legal Framework of Trade Secret Protection in India

(ii) Subject Matter of Trade Secret Protection

(iii) Trade Secret Licenses

(iv) International System of Trade Secret Protection

 

Integrated Circuit (The Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Layout-Design Act, 2000)

  1. Integrated Circuits (The Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Layout-Design Act, 2000)

(i) Meaning

(ii) Registration

(iii) Rights

Text Book:

  1. L. Wadhera, Law Relating to Intellectual Property, 2016(5th Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  2. S. Gopalakrishnan and T.G. Ajitha, Principles of Intellectual Property, 2014(2ndEdn.), Eastern Book Company

 

References:

  1. The Trademarks Act, 1999
  2. The Patent Act, 1970
  3. The Geograhical Indications of Goods (Registration and Protection) Act, 1999
  4. The Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Layout-Design Act, 2000)
  5. Bansal, Law of Trademark In India, 2014, Thomson and Reuter
  6. Elizabeth Verky, Law of Patents, 2012 (2nd .), Eastern Book Company
  7. JayashreeWatal, Intellectual PropertyRightsintheWTOandDevelopingCountries, 2001,Oxford University Press
  8. Narayanan,Law of Trademarks (TheTrademarks Act, 1999)and PassingOff, 2017, Eastern Law House
  9. K. Ahuja,Law Relating to Intellectual Property Law, 2017 (3nd Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  10. R. Cornish, Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyright, Trademark and Allied Rights, 2019 (9th Edn.), Sweet and Maxwell

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Intellectual Property Rights Law-I LWH402 CO1 3 1 3 2 1 2 2 3 1
CO2 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 3
CO3 3 2 3 2 3 1 2 3
CO4 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code Clinic-II (Drafting, Pleading and Conveyancing) (LWH403)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (2-3-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The object of this paper is to train students in the art of drafting both for court purposes as well as for other legal forums.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the significance of drafting and pleadings in the court proceedings Skill development
CO2 To Draft basic documents relevant for civil and criminal proceedings. Skill development
CO3 To Scrutinize the documents of the clients to give legal opinion. Skill development
CO4 To Draft various Conveyancing deeds for the clients or in public interest. Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Fundamental Rules of Pleadings(Contact hours-15)

  1. Pleadings (Order VI CPC)
  2. Plaint Structure
  3. Written Statement andAffidavit
  4. Application under Section 5 of the LimitationAct
  5. Application for setting aside ex-partedecree
  6. Writ Petitions

SECTION B

Civil Pleadings(Contact hours-15)

  1. Suit for Recovery under Order XXXVII ofCPC
  2. Suit for PermanentInjunction
  3. Suit for Dissolution ofPartnership
  4. Application for Temporary Injunction under Order XXXIX ofCPC
  5. Appeal from Original Decree under Order 41 ofCPC
  6. RevisionPetition/ReviewPetition

SECTION C

General Principles of Criminal Pleadings(Contact hours-15)

  1. Application forBail
  2. Application under Section 125CrPC
  3. Compounding of Offences by Way of Compromise under Section 320 (i) CrPC
  4. Complaint under Section 138, Negotiable Instruments Act,1881
  5. Application under Section 482,CrPC

SECTION D

Conveyancing (Contact hours-15)

  1. Notice to the Tenant under Section 106 of Transfer of PropertyAct
  2. Notice under Section 80 ofCPC
  3. Reply toNotice
  4. General Power ofAttorney
  5. Will
  6. Agreement to sale
  7. Sale Deed
  8. Lease Deed
  9. PartnershipDeed
  10. MortgageDeed
  11. RelinquishmentDeed
  12. Deed of Gift

Forms

  1. Petition for Grant of Probate/Letters of Administration
  2. Application for Appointment of Receiver/Local Commissioner
  3. Application for Compromise ofSuit
  4. Application for Appointment ofGuardian
  5. Application to sue as an Indigent Person under Order XXXIII CPC
  6. Appeal from orders under order XLIII ofCPC
  7. Application forexecution
  8. Application for caveat section 148A ofCPC
  9. WritPetition
  10. Special Power ofAttorney
  11. Reference to Arbitration and Deed ofArbitration
  12. Notice for Specific Performance ofContract

Tutorial Activities

  • Drafting of Plaint/Written Statement
  • Drafting of Deeds/ Notices/Documents

Text Books:

  1. C. Mogha and S. N. Dhingra, Mogha’s Law of Pleading in India with Precedents, 2013 (18th Edn.), Eastern Law House
  2. S. Bindra, Conveyancing, Draftsman and Interpretation of Deeds, 2009 (7th Edn.), Eastern Book Company

References:

  1. R. Datta and M.N. Das, D’Souza’s Form and Precedents of Conveyancing, 2018 (13thEdn.), Eastern Law House
  2. C. Mogha, Indian Conveyancer, 2009 (14thEdn.), Eastern Law House
  3. N. Chaturvedi, Pleadings,Drafting and Conveyancing, 2018 (5th Edn.), Eastern Book Company

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Clinic-II (Drafting, Pleading and Conveyancing) LWH403 CO1 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 3 3
CO2 3 2 3 3 1 3 2 3 2 2
CO3 2 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3
CO4 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Law on Mergers and Acquisitions (LWH404)
Course Type Honours (Elective)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The trends of mergers and acquisitions in India have changed over the years. India being a growing economy has all the potential to provide sound market for MNCs to acquire the Indian companies. Similarly, Indian companies are also showing their potential in acquiring big brands and companies. The course aims at exposing the basic tenets of corporate restructuring to the students. The primary objectives of the course are as follows:

 

 To familiarize the students with the law and procedure pertaining to mergers and acquisitions

 To explain the valuation and taxation aspects of corporate restructuring

 To explain the strategic importance of corporate restructuring

 To explain the working of the SEBI Takeover Code and other regulations which govern mergers and acquisitions

 

Course Specific Learning Outcomes To become familiar with coordinating legal and business considerations to achieve optimal client outcomes in a transactional setting.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the relevant laws and procedure pertaining to mergers and acquisitions Employability
CO2 To Advice on the strategic importance and relevance of corporate restructuring to the clients Employability
CO3 To Advise the clients on the legal compliances relating to corporate restructuring Skill development
CO4 To Apply and advice clients on corporate acquisitions as per the SEBI Takeover Code Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

INTRODUCTION

  1. Corporate restructuring: Brief Overview
  2. Economics of Corporate Restructuring
  3. Meaning and Definition of Merger, Acquisition and Amalgamation
  4. Mergers and Acquisitions: A strategic Perspective
  5. Types of Restructuring
  6. Types of Mergers

SECTION B

LEGAL PROVISIONS: THE COMPANIES ACT, 2013

  1. Scheme of Mergers and Acquisitions
  2. Analysis of legal provisions under the Companies Act 2013
  3. Corporate restructuring in Public Interest
  4. Role of Judiciary
  5. Cross Border Mergers and Amalgamations in India

SECTION C

SEBI and TAKEOVER

a.Meaning and kinds of takeover

  1. Hostile Takeover and Takeover Defences
  2. The SEBI Takeover code
  3. Takeover triggers and Disclosure Requirements
  4. Substantial Acquisition of Shares

SECTION D

VALUATION OF SHARES and GOODWILL

  1. Necessity of valuation
  2. Share Valuation
  3. Various Methods of Valuation

d.Meaning of goodwill

e.SWAP

TUTORIALS

1.Corporate combination and its various legal aspects

2.SICA: Revival and Rehabilitation of the Sick Industrial Companies

3.Corporate combination in Banking Sector

4.FEMA

5.Listing Agreement: Clause 40 A and 40 B

6.Tax Aspects of amalgamation

7.Stamp Act provisions

8.Competition Act

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. Pradeep Kumar Jain, Corporate Acquisitions and Mergers in India, Wolters Kluwer, 2016
  2. Rajinder S Aurora and oth. , Mergers and Acquisitions, Oxford University Press, 2011

REFERENCE BOOKS

  1. E and Y, Master Guide to Mergers and Acquisitions in India: Tax and Regulatory, Wolters Kluwer India Private Limited; Fifth edition, 2018
  2. Prasanna Chandra, Corporate Valuation: A Guide for Analysts, Managers and Investors, McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited, 2014
  3. Joshua Rosenbaum , Investment Banking: Valuation, Leveraged Buyouts and Mergers and Acquisitions
  4. Ramappa T; Competition Law In India: Policy, Issues and Developments; Oxford University Press; 2nd edition 2009
  5. Sridharan and Pandian; Guide to Takeoers and Mergers; Lexis Nexis Butterworths Wadhwa nagpur; third edition 2010

RELEVANT CASES

  1. AVM Capital Services (P.) Ltd., In re (2012) 115 SCL 81/23
  2. Essar Telecommunications holding, In Re, (2012) 111 SCL
  3. Larson and Tourbro Ltd. v. Grasim Industries Ltd. (2008) 82 SCL 172 (Bom)
  4. Reliance Natural Resources Ltd v. Reliance Industries Ltd. (2007) 79 SCL 21
  5. National Organic Chemical Industries Ltd. v. Miheer H. Mafatlal (2004) 121 Comp cases519
  6. Moschip Semiconductor Technology Ltd (2004) 59 CLA 354
  7. SEBI v. Sterilite Industries (India) Ltd. (2003) 113 Com Cases 273; (2003) 45 SCL 475 (Bom-DB)
  8. Arvind Mills Ltd. In re (2002) 37 SCL Guj 660
  9. Miheer H. Mfatlal v. Mafatlal industries Ltd. (1996)4 Comp LJ 124
  • Hindustan Lever Employees Union v. Hindustan Lever Ltd.(1994) 4 Com LJ 267
  • Chairman,SEBI v. Shriram Mutual Fund and Another AIR 2006 SC 2287
  • Technip S. A. v. SMS Holding (Pvt) Ltd. and Ors. AIR 2005 SC 0385
  • AIG (Mauritius) LLC v. Tata Televentures Ltd, (53 CLA 353; 43 SCL 22)
  • Banarsi Das Saraf and Others v. Dalmia Dadri Cement Ltd and Another (28 Com Cas 435)
  • Reliance Communications Infrastructures Ltd., (2009) 151 Com Cases 538 (Bom)
  • Bank of Madura Shareholders Welfare Association v Governor, RBI, (2001) 3 Comp LJ 212 Mad
  • Saraswati Industrial Syndicate Ltd. V. CIT, 70 com cases 184
  • Union of India v. Ambalal Sarabhai Enterprises Ltd. (1984) 55 Comp Cases 623
  • Hindustan Lever Employees Union v. Hindustan Lever Ltd and Others (1995) 83 Comp Cas 30 SC

 

Note: The reading material and cases referred above are not exhaustive. New material and case laws shall be provided and discussed during the session.

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Law on Mergers and Acquisitions LWH404 CO1 3 2 2 3 3
CO2 3 2 2 1 1 3
CO3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3
CO4 3 1 2 2 2 3 2 3

 

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Competition Law (LWH405)
Course Type: Honours (Elective)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective To introduce students to the basic economic concepts of Competition, Law and jurisprudence developed through case law.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the economic rationale underlying competition law Employability
CO2 To Apply the law to different forms of competition issues and offer counseling on competition compliance and probable violations by enterprises; Employability
CO3 To Represent the parties before the tribunals and other authorities on competition matters; Skill development
CO4 To Contribute to the development of law on competition in India through opinions and reflections;. Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Fundamentals of Competition (Contact Hours 8)

  1. Basic economic and legal principles;
  2. Restraint of Trade under Indian Contract Act; Monopolistic and Restrictive Trade Practices
  3. Evolution of Competition Law in India

SECTION B

Anti-Competitive Agreement (Contact Hours 8)

  1. Horizontal Agreements
  2. Vertical Agreements
  3. Exceptions

SECTION C

Abuse of Dominant position and Combinations (Contact Hours 8)

  1. Dominant Position
  2. Abusive Practices
  3. Protection of consumers
  4. Combinations (Mergers and Acquisitions)

SECTION D

Competition Authorities (Contact Hours 8)

  1. Competition Commission of India
    1. Structure and function of CCI; regulatory role
  2. Competition Appellate Tribunal
    1. Composition, Functions, Powers and Procedure; Award Compensation; Power to punish for contempt; Execution of orders

Text Books

  1. Versha Vahini, Competition Law 2016 (Lexis Nexis India)
  2. Vinod Dhall, Competition Law Today: Concepts, Issues and the Law in Practice 2019(Oxford University Press)

Reference Books

  1. E. Rodrigues, Ashok Menon, The limits of Competition Policy, the shortcomings of Economics 2018
  2. R.K. Singh, Restriction Trade Practices and Public Interest 2017
  3. S. Anantaranan, Lectures on Company Law and MRTP 2016
  4. Report of the Monopolies Inquiries Commission, Govt. of India 1965 (Dr. Hazari Report)
  5. M. Dugar’s MRTP Law, Competition Law and Consumer Protection 2018
  6. Sachar Committee Report, High Powered Committee on MRTP Act and Company Act, 1980
  7. Suzanne Rab, Indian Competition Law- An International Perspective 2015
  8. Taxmann’s competition Law and Practice

 

 

 

 

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Competition Law LWH405 CO1 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 1 2
CO2 3 1 2 3 3 2 1 3 1 2
CO3 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 1 2
CO4 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 3 1 2

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Juvenile Justice (LWH406)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective “the child is a soul with a being, a nature and capacities of its own, who must be helped to find them, to grow into the maturity, into fullness on physical and vital energy and most breadth, depth and height of its emotional, intellectual and spiritual being”- Justice Bhagwati

This course focuses on the study of law and the social context of the law as it affects children. It builds a foundation for the study of specific laws (child protection, juvenile justice law) by exploring human rights, social and legal perspectives. It considers broader legal and social issues that affect children, including their rights as minor, duty of the State towards Children, prevention of crimes against children, their adoption and guardianship.

 

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Identify the elements of rights of child approach to legal issues affecting children Employability
CO2 To Explain various child protection laws, policy issues and legal processes Employability
CO3 To Apply the child protection laws and represnt them at different fora. Skill development
CO4 To Analyse the limitations of the domestic legislative framework from the perspective of rights of child Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Child and Rights (Contact hours -15)

  1. Who is a “child”? – National and International framework
  2. Rights of Child
    • International Framework
    • N. Declaration of the rights of the Child, 1924, 1959
    • UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1989
    • Special provisions under other international instruments
  3. Constitutional Framework
    • Citizenship and Domicile
    • Fundamental rights
    • Directive Principles of State Policy

SECTION B

Child and Personal Laws (Contact hours -15)

  1. The status of a child in matters of:
    • Marriage
    • Legitimacy
    • Guardianship and Custody
    • Maintenance
    • Adoption
    • Surrogacy

SECTION C

Child and Criminal Justice Administration (Contact hours – 15)

  1. Judicial activism towards protection of children
  2. Special provisions under Juvenile Justice Act 2015
  3. Evidence Act

SECTION D

Offences against children (Contact hours – 15)

  1. Under Indian Penal Code (with relevant sections from supporting statutes)
    • General Exemptions
    • Offences against child
    • Cyber-crimes against children
  2. Sexual offences against children under POCSO

Relevant Statutes:

  1. The Constitution of India, 1950
    2.Child Rights Convention, 1989
    3.Indian Contract Act, 1872
    4.Hindu marriage Act, 1955
    5.Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act, 1956
    6.Code of Criminal Procedure,
    7.Indian Penal Code, 1860
    8.The Hindu Minority and Guardianship Act, 1956
    9.Guardianship and Wards Act, 1869
    10.Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection) Act, 2015
    11.Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulations) Act, 1986

Text Books:

  1. Asha Bajpai, Child Rights in India: Law, Policy and Practice, 2003 (3rd Edn.) (Oxford University Press)
  2. Ved Kumari, The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act 2015 – Critical Analysis, 2017 (Universal Law Publications)
  3. Mamta Rao, Law Relating to Women and Children, 2012 (3rd)(Eastern Book Publications)

Reference Books:

  1. Anjani Kant, The Law relating to Women and Children, 2003 (Central Law Publications)
  2. Child Labour: A textbook for University Students, International Labour Organisation, 2004.
  3. Debarati Halder, Child Sexual Abuse and Protection Laws in India, Sage Publication, 2018
  4. Gautam Banerjee, Child and the Law: An Indian Prespective in Plain Language, Notion Press, 2017
  5. Geeta Chopra, Child Rights in India: Challenges and Social Action, 2016 (Springer Publication)
  6. H L Kumar, Labour and Industrial Law, LexisNexis, 2019.
  7. Satyarthi, and B. Zutshi, (Ed), Globalization, Development and Child Rights 2006 (Shipra Publications)
  8. C. Tripathi and Vibha Arora, Law relating to women and Children, 2012 (Central Law Publications)
  9. S. Bajpai, Juvenile Justice: Impact and Implementation, 2019 (Bloomsbury India)

 

 

 

 

 

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Juvenile Justice LWH406 CO1 3 1 2 3 3 2 2 1 1 2
CO2 3 1 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1
CO3 3 1 2 3 2 3 2 1 2 1
CO4 3 1 3 3 3 3 2 1 1 2

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Criminology, Victimology and Penology (LWH407)
Course Type: Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives This course of Criminology Penology and Victimology would attempt to answer queries of the human mind and afford explanations to criminal behaviour and reactions to crime. Another facet of the subject will be concern for the victims of crime with emphasis on concepts of restorative justice, compensatory jurisprudence and rehabilitative techniques.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Describe the evolution of crime, its changing dimensions and relationship with other social sciences. Employability
CO2 To Apply the reasoning of various schools of thought to explain devient behaviour Employability
CO3 To Analyse the appropriateness of the punishment, compensation and correctional measures in rehabilitation of offenders. Skill development
CO4 To Apply the provisions of Probation Act and Criminal Procedure Code and relevant case laws to a real life given situation. Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A: INTRODUCTION TO CRIME and CRIMINOLOGY

  1. Perspective of crime and criminal; difference between sin, wrong and crime.
  2. Changing concept of crime; definition of crime – legal and social.
  3. Definition of criminology; nature, scope and importance of criminology.
  4. Criminological theories- pre classical, classical, neo classical.
  5. Positive school of criminology, radical criminology.

SECTION B: PROMINENT CRIMINOLOGICAL THOUGHT CURRENTS

  1. Learning theories of causation- differential association theory of Sutherland.
  2. Social disorganization theories- Durkheim, Merton, Anomie.
  3. Psychodynamic theory- Freud.
  4. Economic theory of crime.

SECTION C: PENOLOGY

  1. Definition of penology; concept of punishment and its importance.
  2. Theories of punishment- retributive; deterrent; preventive; reformative.
  3. Kinds of punishment- with special emphasis on capital punishment.
  4. Correctional administration – prison system – definition; types; prison reforms.
  5. Non Institutional form of treatment- probation- parole- open prisons- role of NGO’s.

SECTION D

VICTIMOLOGY

  1. Meaning and scope of victimology.
  2. Problems of crime victims and types of victims.
  3. Role of victim in criminal justice administration.
  4. Concept of compensation: Sections 357 and 357A CrPC.
  5. Concept of restorative justice.

Case Laws:

  1. H. Hoskot v. State of Maharashtra, (1978) 3 SCC 544
  2. Sunil Batra v. Delhi Adm. (1978) 4 SCC 494
  3. Sunil Batra v. Delhi Adm. (1980) 3 SCC 488
  4. Sher Singh v. State of Punjab (1983) 2 SCC 344
  5. Boddisattwa Gautam v. Subhra Chakraborty AIR 1996 SC 922
  6. Chairman, Railway Board v. Chandrima Das – Manu/SC/0046/2000
  7. Hiralal Mullick v. State of Bihar, AIR 1977 SC 2236
  8. Jagmohan Singh v. State of Punjab, (1973) 1 SCC 20
  9. Ediga Anamma v. State ofAP, (1974) 4 SCC 443
  • Rajendra Prasad v. State of UP, AIR 1979SC 916
  • Bachchan Singh v. State of Punjab, AIR 1980 SC 898
  • Machhi Singh v. State of Punjab, AIR 1983 SC 957
  1. Kartar Singh v. State of Punjab, 1994 SCC (Cri) 899
  • Swami Shraddhanand v. State of Karnataka, AIR 2008 SC 3040

 

Reference Material

  1. Ahmed Siddiqui, Criminology: Problems and Perspectives (4th Ed., 1997)
  2. P. S. Sirohi, “Criminology and Penology” Allahabad L aw Agency, Delhi, Sixth Edition, 2004
  3. Krishna Pal Malik, “Penology-Sentencing process and treatment of offenders”; Allahabad Law Agency Delhi First Edition, 2006.
  4. N.V. Paranjape, “Criminology and Penology”, Central Law Publications, Central Law Publications, Allahabad. 13th Edition.
  5. N.V. Paranjape, “Criminology, Penology with Victimology”, Central Law Publications, 2014.
  6. Prakash Talwar, “Victimology”, Isha Books, Delhi, 2006.
  7. B. Pande, ―Face to Face with Death sentence: The Supreme Court‘s Legal and Constitutional Dilemmas‖ (1979) 4 SCC 714 3.
  8. S. Srivastava, ―Capital Punishment‖, Criminology and Criminal Administration (2nd ed. 2002) 89-99
  9. Law Commission of India 262nd Report on Death Penalty
  10. NLUD Report on Death Penalty, 2016 (www.deathpenaltyindia.com).
  11. Chattoraj B.N. (Dr.): ‘Ways and Means for enhancing the aftercare and rehabilitative Programmes for released offenders: An Indian perspective’, (1980-83)
  12. Carson w. Markley: ‘Furlough Programmes and Conjugal Visiting in Adult Correctional Institutions’

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Criminology, Victimology and Penology LWH407 CO1 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 2 3 3
CO2 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3
CO3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3
CO4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code

French-I (FLS103)
Course Type: Allied Elective
L-T-P Structure (2-0-0)
Credits 2
Prerequisite Basic knowledge of grammatical structure, syntax, and vocabulary of English and/or Hindi.
Course Objectives At the end of the course, students will be able to

1.   Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions

2.   Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions

3.   Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary

4.   Express their likes and dislikes. Also will have understanding of simple conversations about familiar topics (e.g., greetings, weather and daily activities,) with repetition when needed

5.   Identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed.

6.   Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary

7.   Provide basic information about familiar situations and topics of interest

8.   Express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs

Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the French-speaking world and the student’s native culture

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions. Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions. Employability, Skill Development
CO2 Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary. Employability
CO3 Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary. Employability, Skill Development
CO4 Students will be able to understand audio text and comprehend to the same. They will be able to form paragraph using auxilary verb and basic verbs. Employability, Skill Development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION-A

Unit – Saluer et épeler l’alphabet

1.1 Les Salutations and forms of politeness

1.2 Alphabets

Unit 2- Usage de Vous et de Tu

2.1 Taking leave expressions

2.2 Les pronoms sujets

2.3 Basic Questions

SECTION-B

Unit 3- Présentez-vous

3.1 Les verbes ER

3.2 Self introduction

3.3 Décrivez votre ami(e)

SECTION-C

Unit 4- Identifier un nombre, compter

4.1 Les nomS.2 Verbes Avoir, Etre, Aller and Faire

4.3 Les nombres

Unit 5- Demander/ donner l’explications

5.1 Les articles define et indefini

5.2 Les mois de l’annee

5.3 Les jours de la semaine

SECTION-D

Unit 6- Parler des saisons et demander l’heure

6.1 Time

6.2 Weather

6.3 Unseen Passage

 

Text Books/Reference Books/ Suggested Readings:

  1. Alter Ego Level One Textbook, Annie Berthet, Catherine Hugot, Hachette Publications
  2. Apprenons Le Francais II and III, Mahitha Ranjit, 2017, Saraswati Publications

 

Weblinks:

www.bonjourfrance.com

www.allabout.com

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
French-I FLS103 CO1 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO2 3 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO3 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO4 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code

German-I (FLS102)
Course Type: Allied Elective
L-T-P Structure (2-0-0)
Credits 2
Prerequisite Basic knowledge of grammatical structure, syntax, and vocabulary of English and/or Hindi.
Course Objectives At the end of the course, students will be able to

1.  Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions

2.  Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions

3.  Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary

4.  Express their likes and dislikes. Also will have understanding of simple conversations about familiar topics (e.g., greetings, weather and daily activities,) with repetition when needed

5.  Identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed.

6.  Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary

7.  Provide basic information about familiar situations and topics of interest

8.  Express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs

9.  Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the French-speaking world and the student’s native culture

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions. Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions. Employability, Skill Development
CO2 Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary. Employability
CO3 Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary. Employability, Skill Development
CO4 Students will be able to understand audio text and comprehend to the same. They will be able to form paragraph using auxilary verb and basic verbs. Employability, Skill Development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION-A

Unit-1: Begrüßungen

1.1 Salutations/Greetings

1.2 Introduction

Unit-2: sich vorstellen und Zahlen

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Alphabets

2.3 Numbers 1-20

SECTION-B

Unit-3: Berufe/ Pronomen

3.1 Personal pronouns

3.2 Hobbies and professions

SECTION-C

Unit-4:Café

4.1 Café related vocabulary and dialogues

4.2 Revision personal pronouns

Unit-5: Café dialog

5.1 Café related vocabulary and dialogues

5.2 Common verbs and their conjugations

SECTION-D

Unit-6: Zeit und Monate

6.1 Time

6.2 Days

6.3 Months

Text Books/Reference Books:

  1. Studio D A1, Hermann Funk, 2011, Cornelson Publication
  2. Tangaram Aktuell A1, Kursbuch and Arbeitsbuch, 2011, Hueber
  3. Netzwerk, Stefanie Dengler, Paul Rusch et. Al, 2011, Klett

Weblinks:

http://www.nthuleen.com/

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
German-I FLS102 CO1 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO2 3 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO3 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO4 3 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code

Spanish-I (FLS101)
Course Type: Allied Elective
L-T-P Structure (2-0-0)
Credits 2
Prerequisite Basic knowledge of grammatical structure, syntax, and vocabulary of English and/or Hindi.
Course Objectives At the end of the course, students will be able to

1.   Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions

2.   Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions

3.   Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary

4.   Express their likes and dislikes. Also will have understanding of simple conversations about familiar topics (e.g., greetings, weather and daily activities,) with repetition when needed

5.   Identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed.

6.   Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary

7.   Provide basic information about familiar situations and topics of interest

8.   Express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs

9.   Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the French-speaking world and the student’s native culture

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To exchange greetings and introductions using formal and
informal expressions and students will be able to ask and answer simple questions.
Skill development
CO2 To discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and
familiar vocabulary and students will be able to discuss likes and dislikes understand simple conversations about familiar topics.
Skill development
CO3 To identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text
dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed and students will be able to offer basic descriptions of self, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary.
Skill development
CO4 To provide basic information about familiar situations and topics
of interest and students will be able to express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs.
Skill development
CO5 Spanish-speaking world and student’s native culture. Skill development
CO6 To describe various places, location, themselves using simple sentences and
vocabulary.
Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION-A

Unit 1: Introduction to Spanish and SER

1.1 Presentation on Spanish language

1.2 Greetings and goodbyes

1.3 Spanish letters

1.4 Introduction of verbo SER

Unit 2: Verb Ser, Nationality, Profession and Counting

2.1 Uses of verbo SER

2.2 Adjectives related to verbo SER.

2.3 Introduction of Nationality

2.4 Professions and vocabulary related to professions.

2.5 Counting till number 20.

SECTION-B

Unit 3: Articles, Interrogative and Estar

3.1 Introduction of Articles and Indefinite articles

3.2 Interrogatives

3.3 Introduction of Verbo Estar

SECTION-C

Unit 4:Estar, Preposition, Tener and Self Introduction

4.1 Uses of Verbo ESTAR and adjectives related to it

4.2 Introduction of ‘my house’ vocabulary

4.3 Prepositions related to the positioning of an object

4.4 Self – introduction

SECTION-D

Unit 5 : Day, Month and Regular AR verb

5.1 Days

5.2 Months

5.3 Introduction to regular –AR verbs

Text Books/Reference Books:

  1. ¡Ole!-Langers
  2. ¡Uno, dos, tres…………

Weblinks:

Home

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 Po2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
Spanish-I FLS101 CO1 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO2 3 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO3 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO4 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO5 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

SEMESTER- VIII

Course Code Course Name Offering Department Course Type (Deptt Allied/Core/ Elective/Audit) Structure Credits
    L T O  
LWH410 Principles of Taxation LAW Core 4 1 0 4

 

LWH411 Intellectual Property Rights Law-II LAW Core 4 1 0 4

 

LWH412 Clinic-III (Moot Court) LAW Core 2 3 0 4
LWH413 Insolvency and Bankruptcy Law LAW Honours
(Elective)
4 1 0 4
LWN414 Law on Infrastructure Develpoment LAW Honours (Elective) 4 1 0 4
LWH415 Socio-Economic Offences LAW Honours (Elective) 4 1 0 4
LWH416 Forensic Science and Criminal Law LAW (Honours Elective) 4 1 0 4
FLS105 Spanish-II CFL Core 2 0 0 2
FLS106 German-II CFL Core 2 0 0 2
FLS107 French-II CFL Core 2 0 0 2
  Total (L-T-P/Credits)     32 9 0 34

 

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Principles of Taxation (LWH410)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives To understand the concept of taxation, heads of income, including foreign income assessment procedures, adjudication and settlement of tax disputes are the focus points of study in this paper.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To apply the provisions relating to agriculture income, residential status and incidence/charge of tax to suggest and guide the client Employability
CO2 To Compute the total income under five heads of income i.e., salaries, house property, profits and gains from business and profession, capital gains and other sources for the individuals and companies Employability
CO3 To calculate by taxable income by applying the methods of clubbing and aggregation of incomes and set-off and carry forward of losses Employability
CO4 To Represent the Client in tax disputes at appropriate forums Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Basic Concepts (Contact hours-15)

  1. Types of Taxes and Distinction between Direct and Indirecttax
  2. Previous Year and AssessmentYear
  3. Definition of Certain Terms: Persons, Assesse, Income, Application of Income
  4. Assesse andAssessment
  5. Capital Receipt and RevenueReceipt
  6. Rates of Income Tax: Proportional and Progressive Rate ofTaxation
  7. Agricultural Income

SECTION B

Residential Status,Chargeability(Contact hours-15)

  1. Meaning and Rules for Determining Residential status of an Assesse
  2. Charge of Income Tax and Scope of TotalIncome
  3. IncomeExempted fromTaxand DeductionunderIncomeTaxLaw
  4. Heads of Income and itsJustification

SECTION C

Heads of Income and Rules of Tax (Contact hours-15)

  1. Tax Treatment to Salary, Perquisites etc.
  2. Tax Treatment to Income from Houseproperty
  3. Profits and Gains of Business andProfession
  4. Capital GainTaxation
  5. Income from other sources

SECTION D

Procedure for Assessment(Contact hours-15)

  1. Set off and Carry Forward ofLosses
  2. Deductions, Refund and TaxAuthorities
  3. Return of Income andAssessment
  4. Penalty and Prosecution for TaxEvasion
  5. Search andSeizure

Text Books:

  1. Chaturvedi and Pithisaria,Income Tax Act with Relevant Tax Allied Acts, 2017, Lexis Nexis
  2. Vinod Singhania and Kapil Singhania, Direct Taxes Law and Practice, 2019 (62th ), Taxmann

References:

  1. Income Tax Act, 1961
  2. Kanga and Palkhivala, The Law and Practice of Income Tax, Lexis Nexis
  3. B. Lal, Income Tax, 2011 (2nd Edn.), Pearson

Important Cases

  1. D. Bharucha v. C.I.T., AIR 1967 SC 1505
  2. Bacha F. Guzdar v. C.I.T., Bombay, AIR 1955 SC 74
  3. Batta Kalyani v. Commissioner of Income Tax (1985) 154 ITR 59
  4. Bikaner Gypsums Ltd. v. C.I.T., AIR 1991 SC 227
  5. I.T. v. Benoy Kumar Sahas Roy, AIR 1957 SC 768
  6. I.T. v. General Insurance Corporation, 2007 (1) SCJ 800
  7. I.T. v. H.G. Date (1971) 82 ITR 71 (Bom.)
  8. I.T. v. Jalan Trading Co. (Pvt.) Ltd. (1985) 155 ITR 536 (SC)
  9. I.T. v. Maddi Venkatasubbayya (1951) XX ITR 151 (Mad.)
  10. I.T. v. Mysore Sugar Co. Ltd., AIR 1967 SC 723
  11. I.T. v. Rajendra Prasad Moody (1978) 115 ITR 519 (SC)
  12. I.T. v. Sunil J. Kinariwala (2003) 1 SCC 660
  13. I.T. v. Sunil J. Kinariwala (2003) 1 SCC 660
  14. I.T. v. Travancore Sugar and Chemicals Ltd., AIR 1973 SC 982
  15. I.T., West Bengal v. Biman Behari Shaw, Shebait (1968) 68 ITR 815 (Cal.)
  16. CIT v. G.R. Karthikeyan, 1993 Supp (3) SCC 222
  17. CIT v. Sitaldas Tirathdas (1961) 2 SCR 634
  18. East India Housing and Land Development Trust Ltd. v. C.I.T. (1961) 42 ITR 49(SC)
  19. Empire Jute Co. v. C.I.T., AIR 1980 SC 1946
  20. M. Mokashi v. Commissioner of Income Tax (1994) 207 ITR 252 (Bom)
  21. Lakshmanan and Co. v. C.I.T. (1999) 239 ITR 597 (SC)
  22. B. Sugar Factory and Oil Mills (P.) Ltd. v. C.I.T., AIR 1981 SC 395
  23. Mohini Thapar v. C.I.T. (1972) 4 SCC 493
  24. Bagavathy Ammal v. C.I.T., Madurai, JT 2003 (1) SC 363
  25. Narottam and Parekh Ltd. v. CIT, Bom. City, AIR 1954 Bom. 67
  26. Philip John Plasket Thomas v. C.I.T., AIR 1964 SC 587
  27. Premier Construction Co. Ltd. v. C.I.T., Bombay City (1948) XVI ITR 380 (PC)
  28. B. Jodhamal Kuthiala v. C.I.T., AIR 1972 SC 126
  29. Ram Pershad v. C.I.T. (1972) 2 SCC 696: AIR 1973 SC 637
  30. Sakarlal Naranlal v. C.I.T., AIR 1965 Guj. 165

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
PRINCIPLES OF TAXATION LWH410 CO1 2 3 3 1 3 3
CO2 1 3 3 2 3 3
CO3 3 2 3 2 2 3
CO4 2 3 2 2 3 3

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Intellectual Property Rights Law-II (LWH411)
Course Type Core
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objective The objective of this course is to acquaint the students with basics of intellectual property rights (Co[yright, industrial design, geographical indication, plant variety and traditional Knowledge) with special reference to Indian law and practice.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Categorize different types of Intellectual Properties. Employability
CO2 To Explain the rights and obligataions under Copyright and Industrial Designs Law Employability
CO3 To Identify the IP infringements and the remedies available to the IP owner Employability
CO4 To Represent the parties in the matters relating to IPR disputes in the court of law Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Copyrights (The Copyright Act, 1999)

  1. Introduction to Copyright Law
  2. Brief Introduction to related International Treaties and Conventions
  3. Subject Matter of Copyright
  4. Economic and Moral Rights
  5. Authorship and Ownership, Term of Copyright
  6. Assignment-Licensing

SECTION B

Copyrights (The Copyright Act, 1999)- Continued

  1. Infringement and Remedies
  2. Exceptions: Fair Dealing

i..International Copyright Order

  1. Neighbouring/Related rights
  2. Issues in Digital Copyrights
  3. Copyrights and Artificial Intelligence (AI) generated work

SECTION C

Industrial Design (The Designs Act, 2000)

  1. Introduction to Designs Law
  2. Brief Introduction to related International Treaties and Conventions
  3. Definitions , Registration of Designs and Procedure
  4. Cancellation of Registration of Design
  5. Piracy of Registered Design and Remedies
  6. Overlapping Between Designs Copyrights and Trademark

SECTION D

Law of Plant Variety Protection and Farmers’ Rights Act, 2001 (The Plant Variety Protection and Farmers Rights Act, 2001)

a.Law of Plant Varieties and Farmers’ Rights

  1. Definitions – breeder, farmer, variety, essentially derived variety, extant variety, farmer’s variety, essential characteristics, denomination, propagating material, seed

ii). Registrable varieties

iii. Rights of Breeders, Farmers and Communities  and Researchers’ Rights ; benefit sharing

  1. Introduction to UPOV- 1976, 1991
  2. Traditional Knowledge and Folklore

i.. Issues and challenges

ii.. Need for protection

iii. Sui generis system of protection

  1. Traditional Cultural Expressions (TCEs)

Text Book:

  1. L. Wadhera, Law Relating to Intellectual Property, 2016(5th Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  2. S. Gopalakrishnan and T.G. Ajitha, Principles of Intellectual Property, 2014(2ndEdn.), Eastern Book Company

References:

  1. The Trademarks Act, 1999
  2. The Designs Act, 2000
  3. The Geograhical Indications of Goods (Registration and Protection) Act, 1999
  4. The Plant Variety Protection and Farmers Rights Act, 2001
  5. Bansal, Law of Trademark In India, 2014, Thomson and Reuter
  6. Jayashree Watal, Intellectual Property Rights in the WTO and Developing Countries, 2001,Oxford University Press
  7. Narayanan, Law of Trademarks (The Trademarks Act, 1999)and Passing Off, 2017, Eastern Law House
  8. K. Ahuja, Law Relating to Intellectual Property Law, 2017 (3nd Edn.), Lexis Nexis
  9. R. Cornish, Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyright, Trademark and Allied Rights, 2019 (9th Edn.), Sweet and Maxwell

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS LAW-II LWH411 CO1 3 1 3 2 1 2 2 3
CO2 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 3
CO3 3 2 3 2 3 1 2 3
CO4 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 2

 

 

Course Title/ Code Clinic-III (Moot Court) (LWH412)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (2-3-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives This paper is aimed at imparting the practical skills of research, case analyses and strategy, witness handling, and presentation of arguments at the trial and appellate stages of a case. The teaching methods used in the course will include hypotheticals, role plays, simulation, and court visits. This course has been divided into four components dealing with Moot courts, trials observance, Court visits and Viva Voce.

For clinical papers, I to IV FACULTY OF LAW MRU will follow the scheme and syllabus as provided in Rules of Legal Education, 2008 for Clinical papers (Papers 21 to 24)

 

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Analyze the moot problem, and distinguish the facts from the issues Skill development
CO2 To Conduct research to identify the appropriate laws applicable to the issues Skill development
CO3 To Draft memorials containing arguments based upon legal principles, statutes and precedents Skill development
CO4 To Present oral submissions in front of judges and respond to their querries Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Moot Court

Every student will do at least three moot courts in a year. The moot court work will be on assigned problem for written submissions and oral advocacy.

SECTION B

Observance of Trial

Students will attend two trials in the court (one Civil and one Criminal). They will maintain a record and enter the various steps observed during their attendance on different days in the court assignment.

SECTION C

Interviewing techniques and Pre-trial preparations and Internship diary

Each student will observe two interviewing sessions of clients at the Lawyer’s Office/Legal Aid Office and record the proceedings in a diary. Each student will further observe the preparation of documents and court papers by the Advocate and the procedure for the filing of the suit/petition. This will be recorded in the diary.

SECTION D

Viva Voice examination on all the above three aspects.

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
CLINIC-III (MOOT COURT) LWH412 CO1 3 1 2 3 3 3 3 1 2 3
CO2 3 1 3 2 2 3 1 1 3 3
CO3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 3
CO4 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 1 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Insolvency and Bankruptcy Law (LWH413)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P-O Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives This course concerns the law and finance of corporate bankruptcy with an emphasis on reorganization. This basic bankruptcy course covers the major facets of bankruptcy that influence business financing transactions.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Differentiate between insolvency and bankruptcy Employability
CO2 To Apply the provisions of relevant laws to corporate debt restructuring of a particular firm Employability
CO3 To Counsel on the procedure in cases of corporate insolvency; Employability
CO4 To Represent the parties in the matters of corporate insolvency in the court of law Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

The fundamentals of debt contracting

  1. Corporate Debt
  2. Events of Default
  3. Security interests
  4. Debt priority

SECTION B

The Bankruptcy Process

  1. Insolvency and Bankruptcy Act
  2. Trigger Operation
  3. The Automatic Stay
  4. Avoidance of pre-bankruptcy transactions
  5. Restructuring and reorganization plan
  6. The treatment of executory contracts
  7. Land Contracts
  8. Contract for sale of goods
  9. Employment Contracts

SECTION C

Corporate Debt Restructuring and other options

  1. Reduction in Share Capital
  2. Compromise or arrangement with creditors
  3. Corporate reorganization
  4. Special Procedure for Banks and Financial Institutions
  5. Special Procedure for Government Companies
  6. Other laws – SICA and SARFAESI Act

SECTION D

Cross-border Bankruptcies

  1. Transnational Legal principles
  2. Conflict of laws
  3. UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-border Insolvency
  4. Assistance to Foreign Courts
  5. Commencement of Proceedings by a foreign creditor
  6. Recognition of Foreign Proceedings

Reference Books:

  1. Insolvency and Bankruptcy Act 2017
  2. Brian A. Blum, Bankruptcy and Debtor/Creditor: Examples and Explanations 2006.
  3. Grant W. Newton and Robert Liquerman, Bankruptcy and Insolvency Taxation, 2008
  4. Irene Lynch-Fannon, Corporate Insolvency and Rescue 2010.

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
INSOLVENCY AND BANKRUPTCY LAW LWH413 CO1 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 3
CO2 3 3 3 2 1 3 1 3 1
CO3 3 3 3 2 2 3 2 3
CO4 3 3 3 2 2 3 1 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code Law on Infrastructure Development (LWN414)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P-O Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Objectives and Outcomes This course is designed to discuss the legal issues involved in infrastructure development, to examine the working of regulators in general and specific to sectors. This course also explain various investment routes available for infrastructure projects besides modes of financing the projects.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Identify the legal rules relating to infrastructure development in India. Employability
CO2 To Evaluate the laws and policies relating to infrastructure development in the country. Employability
CO3 To Advice the clients on legal aspects of investment and financial plans in infrastructure projects Skill enhancement
CO4 To Formulate opinions on the matters of infrastructure development Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Infrastructure sector in India

  1. Definition of infrastructure
  2. Infrastructure development and economic development
  3. Models of Infrastructure development – Public private partnership in infrastructure projects

SECTION B

Legal framework of specific infrastructure sectors

  1. Road and Highways
  2. Railways
  3. Power generation and transmission
  4. Ports and Airports
  5. Telecommunication

SECTION C

Modes of Investment in Infrastructure in India

  1. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and the regulatory environment
  2. Road and Highways
  3. Railways
  4. Power generation and transmission
  5. Ports and Airports
  6. Telecommunication
  7. Challenges for local players and foreign companies looking to enter the market

SECTION D

Financing of infrastructure projects

  1. Debt Financing of Infrastructure projects
    1. Traditional concepts
    2. Traditional security packages
    3. ‘Boiler Plate Clauses’ or Necessary Covenants
  2. Restructuring of Project Finance Debt
  3. Emerging Options for Project Financing

Text Books:

  1. N. Dash, Economics of Infrastructure: Growth and Development, 2007 (Regal Publications)
  2. N Mani, Infrastructure Development and Financing In India, 2012
  3. Piyush Joshi, Law Relating to Infrastructure Projects, 2003 (LexisNexis)
  4. Sunder, Framework for Infrastructure Regulation, TERI Press

Reference Books:

  1. Anurag K Agarwal, Infrastructure, PPP and Law for Executives, 2019, SAGE Publications.
  2. Facilitating Infrastructure Development in India, Asian Development Bank
  3. James P Walsh, Financing Infrastructure in India, International Monetary Fund
  4. N Brega and Trenn Marcos, Infrastructure in Emerging Markets, LAP Lambert Academic Publishing
  5. Sameer Kochhar, Deepak B Phatak, H Krishnamurthy, Gursharan Dhanjal, Infrastructure and Governance Publication, 2008 (1st Edition)
  6. Anup Chatterjee , K NarindarJetli, Industry and Infrastructure Development in India, 2009
  7. Judith – Anne Mackenzie, Text book on Land Law, 2004, Oxford University Press, U.K.
  8. Kevin J Gray, Elements of Land Law 2004, Lexis Nexis, U.K.
  9. N. Joshi, Public Private Partnership in Infrastructure Perspectives, Principles, Practices
  10. Kendemadward Digby, An introduction to the history of the law of real property, 2005, the law book exchange Ltd. UK.
  11. G. Ramachandran, Law of land acquisition and compensation 2000, Eastern Book Company, Lucknow.
  12. C. Gopalakrishnan, Legal Economics (Interactional Dimensions of economics and Law) 2005, Eastern Book Company, Lucknow.

Important Cases:

  1. The Goa Foundation and another vs The Konkan Railway Corporation and Others, AIR 1992 Bom 47
  2. Banwasi Sewa Ashram vs State of UP and others, 1992 AIR 920
  3. Union of India v. Tantia Construction (P) Ltd., (2011) 5 SCC 697.
  4. Flemingo Duty Free Case, Writ Petition 895 of 2011 decided on October 30, 2015 (Bombay High Court)
  5. Dahanu Taluka Environment Protection Group vs Bombay Suburban Electric Supply Ltd JT 1991 (2) SC 1, 1991 (1) SCALE 472, (1991) 2 SCC 539

Note: The reading material and cases referred above are not exhaustive. New material and case laws shall be provided and discussed during the session.

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 Po4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
LAW ON INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT LWN414 CO1 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 3
CO2 3 3 3 2 1 3 1 3
CO3 3 3 3 2 2 3 2 3
CO4 3 3 3 2 2 3 1 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Socio-Economic Offences (LWH415)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives Understanding the historical background of the emergence of concept of White Collar Crime, multifarious ways in which White Collar Crimes can be committed, grasp and analyse the existing legal frameworks to curb and penalize the White Collar Crimes.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Describe the evolution of socio-economic offenses and their relationship with white-collar crimes and other professional crimes etc. Employability
CO2 To identify and interpret the relevant domestic legislation and international instruments dealing with human trafficking and illicit drug trafficking. Employability
CO3 To Advice the clients on the appropriateness of the forums /courts in matters of money laundering and corruption. Skill enhancement
CO4 To Able to apply the provisions of Food Adulteration Laws in India and Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006 and relevant case laws to a real life given situation. Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Socio- Economic Offences (Contact Hours- 5)

  1. Concept and Evolution of ‘Socio-Economic Offences.’
  2. Nature and Extent of Socio-Economic Offences.
  3. Mens Rea, Nature of Liability, Burden of Proof and Sentencing Policy.

SECTION B

Evolution of the Concept of White Collar Crime(Contact Hours- 10)

  1. White Collar Crime: Definitional issues: Sutherland’s definition of white collar crime,
  2. Types of white collar crime
  3. Relationship with other types of crimes, Blue collar crime,
  4. Corporate crime, organized transnational crime, Occupational crime

SECTION C

Laws and Regulations for White Collar Offences (Contact Hours- 15)

  1. The Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989
  2. The Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006
  3. The Prevention of Corruption Act, 1988

SECTION D

Special enforcement procedure (Contact Hours- 5)

  1. Issues in detection, investigation, prosecution and trial
  2. Sentencing policy and practices with respect to economic offences,
  3. Difficulty in the enforcement of laws.

Text Books:

  1. S.P. Singh, Socio- Economic Offences 2015
  2. C. Mehanathan, Law on Prevention of Money Laundering in India 2014.

Reference Books:

  1. Ahmed Siddiqui, Criminology: Problems and Perspectives (4th Ed., 1997)
  2. Bhure Lal, Money Laundering: An insight into the dark world of Financial Frauds 2003 (Siddharth Publications)
  3. Farhad Anabui and Andrew Kakabadse, Corporate sabotage 2004(Jaico Publishing House)
  4. Frederick Oughton, Fraud and White collar crime 1971 (Eleck Bock Ltd.,)
  5. Jack Bologna, Corporate Fraud 1984 (Butterworth Publishers)
  6. Jonathan Reuvid, The Regulation and prevention of Economic Crime 1995.
  7. Kumar (Revised by Justice A.B. Srivastava and C.S. Lal), Commentaries on Prevention of Food Adulteration Act, 1954 (3rd, 2009)
  8. Lawyers Collective (Ed. by Indira Jaising), Handbook on Law of Domestic Violence (1st Ed., 2009)
  9. C. Mehanathan, Law on Prevention of Money Laundering in India 2014.
  10. Mahesh Chandra, Socio- Economic Offences 1979.
  11. S. Narayan, Commentary on Immoral Traffic Prevention Act, 1956 (2nd Ed., 2013)
  12. Richard H Blum, Delivers and Deceived 1972 (Charles, C. Thomas Publishers)
  13. Seth and Capoor, Prevention of Corruption Act (3rd , 2000)
  14. V. Nawal, Legally Combating Atrocities against SC and ST 2004.

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 Po5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
SOCIO-ECONOMIC OFFENCES LWH415 CO1 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 3
CO2 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3
CO3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ _
CO4 3 2 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 _ _
Course Title/ Code Forensic Science and Criminal Law (LWH416)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives Forensic science is a vital instrument for the detection or investigation of crime and the administration of justice, providing crucial information about the evidence found at crime scene.

This course will acquaint the students with the fundamentals, history, basic principles and significance of forensic science. The definition and types of crime scene, role of crime scene investigator, importance of forensic science principles. Students will learn about various techniques used for criminal investigation and collection of evidences.

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Describe and compare the relevance of scientific investigating techniques in the criminal justice systems of diverse societies Employability
CO2 To Apply appropriate principles of forensic analysis to aide real criminal investigations Employability
CO3 To Examine challenges posed by scientific investigation techniques to the Indian society and give suggestions thereon Skill enhancement
CO4 To Counsel clients, investigating officers and court on admissibility of forensic evidences Skill enhancement
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Forensic Science

  1. Concept of forensic science – Basic elements and historical evolution
  2. Interface between forensic science and criminal justice system.
  3. Scope, importance, need and functions of forensic science
  4. Role and nature of forensic scientist.

SECTION B

Principles of Forensic Science and concept of scene of crime

  1. Principles that underpin forensic analysis

i.)Law of Individuality

ii)Principle of Exchange

iii)Law of Progressive change

iv)Law of Comparison

v)Law of Analysis

vi)Law of Probability

vii)Law of Circumstantial Facts

  1. Relation of forensic science with criminal investigation – concept of scene of crime
  2. Issues associated with collection of forensic evidence at the crime scene- quality and preservation of crime scene and recording of crime scene.

SECTION C

Modern Scientific Techniques in Criminal Investigation

  1. Scientific investigation techniques
  2. i) Narco Analysis Test
  3. ii) Polygraph- Lie Detector Test

iii)  BEAP- Brain Electric Activation Profile

  1. iv) DNA profiling
  2. v) Paternity test
  3. vi) Fingerprints

vii) Ballistic

viii)Voice identification- Forensics Acoustics- Speaker Identification

  1. ix) Documents
  2. x) Trace evidence- hair-fiber etc
  3. Application of above modern techniques to criminal trials, investigations, appeals.
  4. Challenges in the use of these technologies and present situation in Indian perspective.

Case laws:

  • Gautam Kundu v. West Bengal (1993) 3 SCC 418. (Paternity Test)
  • Kanti Devi v Poshi Ram AIR 2001 S.C 2026. (Paternity Test)

 

SECTION D

Legislative and Judicial Framework

  1. Indian Evidence Act- Relevant Provisions relating to rules of relevancy and admissibility
  2. Expert witness, dying declaration, cross examination and re-examination of witnesses
    1. (Sections 32, 45, 46, 47, 51, 57, 58, 60, 73, 112, 114A, 135, 136, 137, 138, 141)
    2. Frye case and Daubert Standard of admissibility of expert testimony (USA)
    3. Criminal Procedure Code
      1. (Sec 53[Explanation as to DNA Profiling, 2005 amendment] 53A, 54, [2005 Amendment], 161(2) [right to silence], police inquest [sec 174, 175], magistrate inquest [ sec 176])
    4. Constitutional Provisions- Article 20(3), Article 21(right to privacy)
    5. Nandini Sathpathy v. P.L.Dani AIR 1978 SC 1025 (right to silence)
    6. Rojo George v. Deputy Superintendent of Police 2006 (2) KLT 197 (Brain mapping, polygraph)
    7. Rajesh Talwar and Another v. Central Bureau Investigation through its Director and Other (famously known as Arushi Murder Case, 2013)
    8. State of Bombay v. KathiKalu Oghad AIR 1961 SC 1808 (Narco analysis)
    9. Selvi v. State of Karnataka AIR 2010 SC1974 (Narco analysis, Polygraph test)
    10. Ram Swaroop v. State of U.P.AIR 2000 SC 715 (Rigor Mortis)
    11. K. Usman Koya v. C.S. Santha, AIR 2003 Ker. 191 (handwriting expert evidence)
    12. Musheer Khan v. State of M.P., AIR 2010 SC 762 (Fingerprint Impression)
    13. Solanki Chimanbhai Ukabhai v. State of Gujarat, AIR 1983 SC 484 (Value of medical opinion)
    14. Anil Kumar v. State of U.P., AIR 2004 SC 4662 (Medical opinion v oral evidence)
    15. Kehar Singh v. State (Delhi Admn.), 1988 AIR SC 1883 (Post Mortem report).
    16. Pritam Singh v. State of Punjab, AIR 1956 SC 415 (Science of Footprints)
    17. Abdul Razak v. State of Maharashtra, AIR 1970 SC 283 (Dog Tracking)

Reports

  1. Expeditious Investigation and Trial of Criminal Cases Against Influential Public Personalities, Report no.239 submitted by The Law Commission of India, March 2012
  2. Malimath Committee Report on Criminal Law Reforms, 2003.

 

Books:

  1. J. Schwoeble and D.L. Exline, Current Methods in Forensic Gunshot Residue Analysis, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2000).
  2. R. Sharma; “Forensic Science in criminal Investigation and Trails”, Universal pub., 2013
  3. B. Nanda and R.K. Tiwari, Forensic Science in India: A Vision for the Twenty First Century, Select Publishers, New Delhi (2001).
  4. J. Heard, Handbook of Firearms and Ballistics, Wiley and Sons, Chichester (1997).
  5. Elaad in Encyclopedia of Forensic Science, Volume 2, J.A. Siegel, P.J. Saukko and G.C. Knupfer (Eds.), Academic Press, London (2000)
  6. K. Bhasin and S. Nath, Role of Forensic Science in the New Millennium, University of Delhi, Delhi (2002). Modi’s Medical Jurisprudence, Butterworth and Co. (India), Ltd.
  7. Saferstein, Criminalistics, 8th Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey (2004). 6. W.J. Tilstone, M.L. Hastrup and C. Hald, Fisher’s Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2013).
  8. H. James and J.J. Nordby, Forensic Science: An Introduction to Scientific and Investigative Techniques, 2nd Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2005).
  9. F. Rowe, Firearms identification, Forensic Science Handbook, Vol. 2, R. Saferstein (Ed.), Prentice Hall, New Jersey (1988).
  10. G. Eckert and R.K. Wright in Introduction to Forensic Sciences, 2nd Edition, W.G. Eckert (ED.), CRC Press, Boca Raton (1997).

Research Articles:

  1. “Beyond Forensic Science: The Different Types of Forensics”, available at: http://discovercriminaljustice.com/articles/beyond-forensic-science-the-different-types-of-forensics/
  2. K. Srivastava, “DNA testing and human rights implications in civil and criminal investigations”, CrLJ, Apr; 113(1288): J81-84p, 2007.
  3. Akshat Rathi, “India’s DNA profiling bill may become one of the world’s most intrusive laws, available at: http://qz.com/463279/indias-dna-profiling-bill-may-become-one-of-the-worlds-most-intrusive-laws/
  4. Caesar Roy, “Narco analysis test-Infringement of individual fundamental rights and as value as evidence”, CrLJ, March; 115: 69-72p, 2009.
  5. Dick Warrington, “Preventing Crime Scene Contamination”, available at: http://www.forensicmag.com/articles/2014/01/preventing-crime-scene-contamination
  6. Elonnia Hickok, Vipul Kharbanda and Vanya Rakesh, “CIS Comments and Recommendations to the Human DNA Profiling Bill”, June 2015, available at: http://cis-india.org/internet-governance/blog/cis-comments-and-recommendations-to-human-dna-profiling-bill-2015
  7. V. Rao, “DNA testing: Mere match is not conclusive proof unless statistics corroborate”, CrLJ, October; 4(10): J296-J300p, 2012.
  8. Gunjan Agrahari, “Narco analysis p300 test: Its objects and evidentiary evaluation”, CrLJ, July; 113(1291): J171-74p, 2007.
  9. K. Semwal and Garima Agarwal, “Forensic aspects of auditing and accounting a tool for scientific investigation of financial crimes”, Indian Journal of Criminology and Criminalistics, Jan-Dec; 25(1-3): 78-84p, 2004.
  10. A. Qureshi, “Speedy and scientific investigation of corruption cases”, Central India Law Quarterly, Apr-Jun; 13: 197-205p, 2000
  11. Megha Shankar, “A Critical Analysis of Crime Investigation System in India”, available at: http://www.academia.edu/1983481/A_Critical_Analysis_of_Crime_Investigating_System_in_India
  12. Naresh Kumar and Ved Pal Singh, “Narco-analysis test in investigation process: Law and judiciary”, M.D.U. LJ; 14(1): 107-20p, 2009.
  13. A. Sebastian, “Narco-analysis and the Indian criminal justice system”, EPW, Sep.; 43(36): 19-20p, 2008.
  14. Prarthana Banerjee, “Violation of human rights through scientific techniques”, CrLJ, July; 119;7(1363) : J106-J112p, 2013.
  15. Sarah Knapton,“Why your fingerprints may not be unique”, The Telegraph, 24th September 2015, available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/10775477/Why-your-fingerprints-may-not-be-unique.html
  16. Satyendera Kaul, “Narcoanalysis, brain mapping, hypnosis and lie detector tests in interrogation of suspect”, ALA, Allahabad, 2008
  17. Study conducted by Innocence Project, available at: http://www.innocenceproject.org/free-innocent/improve-the-law/fact-sheets/dna-exonerations-nationwide
  18. Vaishali Shah, “Narcoanalysis: Illusion or truth?” Gujarat Law Herald, 2(6)June 30, 2013, 24-29p.

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
FORENSIC SCIENCE AND CRIMINAL LAW LWH416 CO1 2 1 2 1 1 3 2 2 2 1 _ _
CO2 3 1 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 1 _ _
CO3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 _ _
CO4 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 _ _

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code

French-II (FLS107)
Course Type: Allied Elective
L-T-P Structure (2-0-0)
Credits 2
Pre-Requisites Basic knowledge of grammatical structure, syntax, and vocabulary of French
Course Objectives At the end of the course, students will be able to

1.  Recognize numbers and tell their age using numbers.

2.  Tell and ask time in 12 hour and 24 hour format

3.  Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss the weather and seasons

4.  Identify colors, professions and adjectives in French and describing different people and objects using these three.

5.  Describe orally and in writing themselves, their family and their friends.

6.  Use reflexive verbs to describe daily routine.

7.  Identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed.

8.  Provide basic information about familiar situations and topics of interest

9.  Express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs

10.           Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the French-speaking world and the student’s native culture

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 .Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions. Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions. Employability, Skill Development
CO2 Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary. Express their likes and dislikes. Also will have understanding of simple conversations about familiar topics (e.g., greetings, weather and daily activities,) with repetition when needed. Employability, Skill Development
CO3  Identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed. Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary. Employability, Skill Development
CO4  Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary. Provide basic information about familiar situations and topics of interest. Employability, Skill Development
CO5 Express Gorand justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs. Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the French-speaking world and the student’s native culture. Express Gorand justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs. Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the French-speaking world and the student’s native culture.
CO6 Describe various places, location, themselves using simple sentences and vocabulary. Employability, Skill Development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION-A

Unit 1- Se présenter (1)

1.1 Les pluriels

1.2 Adjectives to describe a person

Unit 2- Se présenter (2)

2.1 Professions

2.2 Short essay on family and friend

2.3 Comprehension

SECTION-B

Unit 3- Parler de ses habitudes quotidiennes

3.1 Les verbes pronominaux

3.2 Décrivez votre journée

SECTION-C

Unit 4- Nommez et localiser des lieux dans la ville

4.1 Prepositions

4.2 Asking and telling the way

Unit 5- Informations simples sur le climat, la météo

5.1 Les saisons

5.2 Les expressions de la saison

5.3 Comprehension

SECTION-D

Unit 6- Demander/ indiquer les horaires et les couleurs

6.1 Timings

6.2 Colours

Text Books/Reference Books/ Suggested Readings:

  1. Alter Ego Level One Textbook, Annie Berthet, Catherine Hugot, Veronique M Kizirian,Hachette Publications
  2. Apprenons Le Francais II and III, Mahitha Ranjit, 2017, Saraswati Publications

Weblinks:

www.bonjourfrance.com

www.allabout.com

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
FRENCH-II FLS107 CO1 _ 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO2 _ 3 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO3 _ 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO4 _ 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO5 _ 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code

German-II (FLS106)
Course Type: Allied Elective
L-T-P Structure (2-0-0)
Credits 2
Pre-Requisites Students are expected to have basic knowledge of German grammar. They should know regular verbs and conjugations. They should be able introduce themselves and make small sentences in German language.
Course Objectives At the end of the course, students will be able to

1.    Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions

2.    Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions

3.    Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary

4.    Express their likes and dislikes. Also will have understanding of simple conversations about familiar topics (e.g., greetings, weather and daily activities,) with repetition when needed

5.    Identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed.

6.    Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary

7.    Provide basic information about familiar situations and topics of interest

8.    Express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs

9.    Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the German-speaking world and the student’s native culture.

 

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To discuss about various directions, countries and languages they speak Skill development
CO2 To write short essays on family and friends. They will have knowledge of
tenses.
Skill development
CO3 To identify classroom vocabulary in the German language Skill development
CO4 To              speak ordinal and cardinal numbers and they will also learn months, days in German Skill development
CO5 To express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs Skill development
CO6 To describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary. Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION-A

Unit 1

1.1 Ordinal and Cardinal numbers

1.2 Months, days, Feiertage and dates

SECTION-B

Unit 2

2.1 Verbs: to be and to have

2.2 helping verbs practice worksheets

2.3 Vocabulary (Family) short essay on family, friends etc.

SECTION-C

Unit 3

3.1 Vocabulary (classroom)

3.2 Definite and indefinite articles

SECTION-D

Unit 4

4.1 Countries, languages, directions

4.2 Past of the verb ‘to be’

Text Books/Reference Books:

  1. Rita Maria Niemann, Cornelsen, 2005, Studio d A1: Deutsch als Fremdsprache, Volume 6
  2. Dallapiazza, Rosa-Maria and Jan, Eduard von. Tangram aktuell 1. Deutsch als Fremdsprache Tangram aktuell 1 – Lektion 1-4: Deutsch als. (Hueber Verlag, 2005).
  3. Dallapiazza, Rosa-Maria and Jan, Eduard von. Tangram aktuell 1. Deutsch als Fremdsprache Tangram aktuell 1 – Lektion 5-8: Deutsch als. (Hueber Verlag, 2005)
  4. Paul Rusch, 2015: Langenscheidt and Klett

Weblinks:

http://www.nthuleen.com/

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
GERMAN-II FLS106 CO1 _ 3 2 3 3
CO2 _ 3 3 3
CO3 _ 3 2 3 3
CO4 _ 3 3 3
CO5 _ 3 2 3 3
CO6 _ 3 2 3 3

 

 

 

Course Title/ Code

Spanish-II (FLS105)
Course Type: Allied Elective
L-T-PStructure (2-0-0)
Credits 2
Pre-Requisites Basic knowledge of grammatical structure, syntax, and vocabulary of Spanish
Course Objectives At the end of the course, students will be able to

1.   Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions

2.   Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions

3.   Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary

4.   Express their likes and dislikes. Also will have understanding of simple conversations about familiar topics (e.g., greetings, weather and daily activities,) with repetition when needed

5.   Identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed.

6.   Describe colours, clothing,  profession, family and marital status in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary

7.   Provide basic information about familiar situations and topics of interest

8.   Express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs

9.   Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world and the student’s native culture

Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Exchange greetings and do introductions using formal and informal expressions. Understand and use interrogative and answer simple questions. Skill development
CO2 To Learn Basic vocabulary that can be used to discuss everyday life and daily routines, using simple sentences and familiar vocabulary. Express their likes and dislikes. Also will have understanding of simple conversations about familiar topics (e.g., greetings, weather and daily activities,) with repetition when needed. Skill development
CO3 To Identify key details in a short, highly-contextualized audio text dealing with a familiar topic, relying on repetition and extra linguistic support when needed. Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary. Skill development
CO4 To Describe themselves, other people, familiar places and objects in short discourse using simple sentences and basic vocabulary. Provide basic information about familiar situations and topics of interest. Skill development
CO5 To Express or/and justify opinions using equivalents of different verbs. Differentiate certain patterns of behavior in the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world and the student’s native culture. Skill development
CO6 To Describe various places, location, themselves using simple sentences and vocabulary. Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION-A

Unit 1- Mi famila

1.1 Describe your family

1.2 Adjectives to describe a person

1.3 Short essay on family and friend

Unit 2- Gustar

2.1 Likes and dislikes

2.2 Conjugation

2.3 Comprehension

SECTION-B

Unit 3- Verbos Irregulares y reflexivos

3.1 Conjugation

3.2 Routina diaria

3.3 Sentence formation

 

SECTION-C

Unit 4- El horario

4.1 Timings

4.2 Colours

Unit 5- Estar+gerundio

5.1 Conjugation

5.2 Prepositions

5.3Picture description

SECTION-D

Unit 6- Ser y estar

6.1 Direction

6.2 Comprehension

Text Books/Reference Books:

  1. ¡Ole!-Langers
  2. ¡Uno, dos, tres…………

Weblinks:

Home

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
SPANISH-II FLS105 CO1 _ 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO2 _ 3 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO3 _ 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO4 _ 2 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO5 _ 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
CO6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

SEMESTER- IX

Course Code Course Name Offering department Course Type(Deptt Allied/Core/Elective/ Audit) Structure Credits
  L T P  
LWH501 Public International Law and Human Rights Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH502 Environmental Law Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH503 Information Technology and Telecommunication Law Law Core 4 1 0 4
LWH504 Banking and Insurance Law Law Honours Elective 4 1 0 4
LWH505 Commercial Arbitration – Theory and Doctrines Law Honours Elective 4 1 0 4
LWH506 Gender Justice Law Honours Elective 4 1 0 4
LWH507 International Humanitarian and Refugee Law Law Honours Elective 4 1 0 4
LWO508 Internship Viva-IV Law Core 0 0 1 1
Semester (L-T-P/ Credits) 28 7 1 29

 

 

 

 

 

SEMESTER- IX

Course Title/ Code Public International Law and Human Rights (LWH501)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The objectives of this paper are to acquaint students with basics of Public International law and update them with the latest development.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the nature and sources of international law Employability
CO2 To Describe the international framework on war, peace, trade and recognition of states Employability
CO3 To Analyse and suggest on asylum and extradition by applying the relevant law Employability
CO4 To Analyze the international framework on human rights Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Sources of International Law (Contact Hours -15)

Meaning, Nature, Types and Development of International Law

International law and Municipal Law

Sources of International Law – General Principles, Customs, Treaties, General Assembly and Security Council Resolutions and other sources

 

International Law- Indian context

 

SECTION B

Recognition, Extradition and the Law of the Sea (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Recognition
    1. Theories of Recognition (Oppenheim’s view)
    2. Recognition- A legal or Political problem – Hallstein’s Doctrine, Forms of Recognition
    3. De facto and De jure Recognition, Withdrawal of recognition, Consequences of recognition etc.
  2. Extradition and Asylum -State Jurisdiction, Customary Law and Treaty Law
  3. Law of the Sea- Territorial Sea, Contiguous Zone, High Sea etc.

SECTION C

Laws of War, Trade and Commerce (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Laws of War: Settlement of disputes- amicable means, compulsive means
  2. Termination of War- Modes of termination, effects of treaty of peace
  3. New International Economic Order
    • International Economic Institutions- IBRD, IFC, GATT, IMF, UNCITRAL
    • WTO- Functions, Decision making, Dispute Resolution Mechanisms

SECTION D

National and International Human Rights Law (Contact Hours 15)

  1. International Declarations and Covenants
    1. UDHR – Articles 1-30
    2. Covenants of 1966 (ICCPR and ICESCR)
    3. Optional Protocols

 

Tutorial Activities

  • Moot Court
  • Analysis of International Treaties/Convention
  • Discussion Forums

Text Books:

  1. James Crawford Brownlie, Principles of International Law, 2013 (8th), Oxford University Press
  2. K. Kapoor, International Law and Human Rights, 2018, Central Law Agency

References:

  1. Boyle and C. Chinkin, The Making of International Law, Foundations of Public International Law, 2007, Oxford University Press
  2. Brownlie, International Law and the Use of Force by States, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991
  3. Malcolm N. Shaw, International Law, 2008 (8th Edn), Cambridge University Press
  4. Starke, Introduction to International Law, 2013 (11th), Oxford University Press

Important Cases

  1. Abu Salem v. State of Maharashtra (2011) SCC 214
  2. Arrest and Restoration of Savarkar (France/Great Britain, 1911)
  3. Arrest Warrant of 11 April 2000(Democratic Republic of the Congo v. Belgium) ICJ Rep. 2002, p.3
  4. Asylum Case (Columbia v. Peru), ICJ Rep. 1950, p. 266
  5. Barcelona Traction, Light and Power Co. Ltd. Case, ICJ Rep.1964, p. 6
  6. Corfu Channel Case, ICJ Rep. 1949, p.
  7. In the Matter of the Bay of Bengal Maritime Boundary Arbitration (between the People’s Republic of Bangladesh and the Republic of India), PCA, 2014.
  8. La Grand Case (Germany v. United States of America) ICJ Reports 2001, p. 466
  9. Libya v. Tunisia Continental Shelf Case, ICJ Rep. 1982, p. 17
  10. Lotus Case (France v. Turkey), PCIJ, Ser. A, No. 10 (1927)
  11. Nicaragua Case (Nicaragua v. USA) ICJ Rep.1986, p. 14
  12. North Sea Continental Shelf Cases, ICJ Rep. 1969, p. 3
  13. North Sea Continental Shelf Cases, ICJ Rep. 1969, p. 3
  14. Reparation for Injuries Suffered in the Service of the United Nations Case. ICJ Rep.1949, p. 174
  15. Republic of Italy v. Union of India (2013) 4 SCC 721
  16. Rights of Passage over Indian Territory (Merits) (Portugal v. India), ICJ Rep. 1960, p. 6
  17. Temple of Preah Vihear Case (Merits) (Cambodia v. Thailand), ICJ Reports 1962, p.6

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS LWH501 CO1 3 2 3 2 2 2 _ 2 1 3 _ _
CO2 3 2 3 2 3 3 _ 2 1 3 _ _
CO3 3 2 3 2 3 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _
CO4 3 3 3 2 3 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _
Course Title/ Code Environmental Law (LWH502)
Course Type: Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The objective of this paper is to acquaint the students with the environmental issues and the measures taken for its protection along with the norms prevailing at international and national level.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the role of law, policy and institutions in the conservation and management of natural resources as well as pollution control Employability
CO2 To Establish the link between Environment and Sustainable Development Employability
CO3 To Describe the laws and policies at the national and international level relating to environment Employability
CO4 To Advice on the pollution control measures by applying relevant laws, policies and judicial decisions Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Environmental Law: International and National Perspective

  1. Introduction: Environment and Environment Pollution: Problem and prospects
  2. Constitutional Perspective: Right to Evolution and Application, Co relation between: Directive Principles of State Policies and Fundamental Rights
  3. International Norms: Sustainable DevelopmentSustainable Development and International Legal Order in 21st Century: Precautionary Principle, Polluter Pays Principle,
  4. Principle of no-fault liability: Absolute Liability
  5. Environment Protection through Public Interest Litigation

SECTION B

Prevention and Control of Water, Air, Noise and Land Pollution

  1. The Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974
  2. Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981
  3. Noise Pollution Control Order, 2000
  4. Land Pollution

SECTION C

Special Environmental Legislations

  1. Environmental (Protection) Act, 1986
  2. The National Environment Tribunal Act, 1995
  3. The National Appellate Environmental Authority Act, 1997

SECTION D

International Environment Laws and Current Trends

  1. Environmental Law: Human Rights Perspective
  2. Stockholm Declaration: Brief overview
  3. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
    1. Rio-Declaration of 1992
    2. Kyoto Protocol 1997
    3. Paris Agreement 2020

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Visit to Pollution Control Boards
  • Pollution/Biodiversity Park/ Zoos/ NGT, Delhi and Preparation of Projects
  • Preparation of plans for Water, Air Pollution

Legislations:

  1. The Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974
  2. The Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981
  3. The Indian Forest Act, 1927
  4. The Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980
  5. The Wildlife Protection Act, 1972
  6. The Environment (Protection) Act, 1986
  7. The Public Liability Insurance Act, 1991
  8. The National Environment Tribunal Act, 1995
  9. The National Environment Appellate Authority Act, 1997

Textbooks:

  1. Shyam Diwan and Armin Rosencranz, Environmental Law and Policy in India, Oxford University Press, 2nd Edition, 2001.
  2. Leelakrishnan, Environmental Law in India, Lexis Nexis, 3rd Edition, 2008

Reference Books:

  1. C. Shastri, Environmental Law, Eastern Book Company, 4th Edition, 2012
  2. Gurdip Singh, Environmental Law in India, MacMillan Publisher, 2005
  3. Sneh Lata Verma, Environmental Problems: Awareness and Attitude, Academic Excellence Publishers and Distributors, Delhi, 2007
  4. Benny Joseph, Environment Studies, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2009

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW LWH502 CO1 3 1 3 2 3 3 _ 3 2 3 _ _
CO2 3 1 3 3 3 3 _ 1 3 2 _ _
CO3 3 3 3 2 3 3 _ 2 2 3 _ _
CO4 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ 3 2 2 _ _

 

 

Course Title/ Code Information Technology and Telecommunications Law (LWH503)
Course Type: Core (Departmental)
L-T-P-O Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The main purpose of the paper is to introduce the conceptual aspect of Information Technology and Telecommunications, prevailing legal and regulatory framework at national as well as International Level.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To explain the role of technology in our life and economic growth of the country Employability
CO2 To Describe the legal framework governing information technology and telecommunication Employability
CO3 To Advice and counsel the parties on the various aspects of Information Technology Act 2002 Employability
CO4 To Represent the parties at appropriate forums, in the matters involving cyber crimes Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Basic concept of Technology and Law
    1. Understanding the Technology
    2. Scope of Cyber Laws
    3. Cyber Jurisprudence
  2. E-Commerce and E-Contracts
    1. The Indian Law of Contract
    2. Types of Electronic Contracts
    3. Construction of Electronic Contracts

 

SECTION B

IPR In Cyber Space (Contact Hours -15)

a.Copyright in Information Technology

a.Copyright in internet
b.Software Piracy
c.Multimedia and copyright issues

b.Patents

a.Indian position on computer related patents
b.International context of patents

  1. Trademarks
    1. Trade mark and Domain Names
    2. Infringement and passing off

SECTION C

Information Technology Act 2000 and Cyber Crimes

  1. Digital Signature
    b.E-Governance
    c.Regulation of Certifying Authorities
    d.Duties of Subscribers
    e.Penalties and Adjudication
    f.Offences under the Act
    g.Indian Penal Law and Cyber Crimes

a.Mischief, Fraud and Forgery
b.Hacking
c.Tresspass and Defamation
d.Stalking and Pornography
e.Spam

h.Contemporary Issues of Internet Governance

a.Freedom of Expression in Internet
b.Issues of Censorship
c.Hate Speech
d.Sedition
e.Libel
f.Privacy Issues

SECTION D

Telecommunication Law (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Technological and economic Reforms in Telecommunication sector in India
  2. Telecommunication Services
    1. Internet services, Cable, terrestrial and satellite Broadcasting, cellular and mobile services
  3. Regulatory Framework
    1. Telegraph act 1885
    2. Telecommunication Regulatory Authority of India
    3. Consumer Protection
    4. Competition Law

Text Books:

  1. Harish Chander, Cyber Laws and IT Protection, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., 2012
  2. Vakul Sharma, Information Technology Law and Practice, Universal Law Publishers, 2011 (3rd Edn)
  3. Vikram Raghavan, Communications law in India: legal aspects of telecom, broadcasting, and cable services, LexisNexis Butterworths, 2007

Reference Material

  1. Gerold R.Ferresc, Cyber Law (Text and Cases)
  2. Nandan Kamath, Law Relating to Computers, Internet and Ecommerce, Universal Law Publishing Co., Ltd., 2006
  3. Nandita Adhikari, Law and Medicine, Central Law Publication, 2012
  4. Pavan Duggal, Mobile Law, Universal Law Publishing Co., Ltd., 2012
  5. S.R. Bhansali, Information Technology Act
  6. Rodney D.Ryder : Guide to Cyber Law
  7. UN Office on Drugs and Crime, Comprehensive Study of Cyber Crime (Report)

 

 

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS LAW LWH503 CO1 3 2 2 2 1 2 _ _
CO2 2 2 1 3 3 1 _ _
CO3 1 1 3 2 3 3 1 _ _
CO4 2 3 2 3 1

 

 

Course Title/ Code Banking and Insurance Law (LWH504)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To identify the relevant laws regulating the baking sector in India Employability
CO2 To advise and counsel the parties on the defaults and recovery of debt by banks Employability
CO3 To represent the parties at the appropriate forums in the matters involving insurance contracts and claims Skill enhancement
CO4 To Reflect upon the contemporary issues in banking sectors such as bank frauds, NPAs and willful defaults etc. Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Banking System in India (Contact Hours- 15)

  1. Kinds of Banks and their functions
  2. History of Banking in India; Bank Nationalization and Social Control over Banking
  3. Role of Central Bank
    1. Characteristics, Functions and Monopoly of Currency;
    2. Regulation of Monitory Mechanism of the Economy (Monetary Policy)
    3. Credit Control, Exchange Control
  4. Banking Regulation Laws
    1. Reserve Bank of India Act 1934
    2. Banking Regulation Act 1949
    3. Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881
    4. Cryptocurrency and its regulation in india

 

SECTION B

Banks and Customer, Deposit Insurance and Lending (Contact Hours- 15)

a.Relationship between Banker and Customer

  1. Legal Character
  2. Contract between Banker and customer
  3. Special Features of relationship
  4. Bank’s duty to customers
  5. Liability under Consumer Protection Act

b.Deposit Insurance

  1. The Deposit Insurance Corporation Act 1961
  2. Relationship between insured banks, DIC and Reserve Bank of India
  3. Principles of Lending

a.Nature of Securities and Risks Involved

SECTION C

Recovery by Banks and Bank Frauds (Contact Hours- 15)

  1. Recovery of Debts with or without Intervention of the Courts/ Tribunals

b.Recovery of Debts due to Banking and financial Institutions Act 1993

c.Securitization and Reconstruction of Financial Assets and Enforcement of Security Interests Act 2002 (SRFAESI)

  1. Banking Fraud

a.Nature and Kinds of Bank Frauds

b.Legal Framework to Control Banking Frauds

  1. Recent Trends in Banking: Automatic Teller Machine and Internet Banking, Smart Cards, Credit cards
  2. Legal Framework to control Banking Frauds

SECTION D

Insurance Law (Contact Hours- 15)

  1. Nature of Insurance Contracts
  2. Kinds of Insurance
  3. Life Insurance
  4. Mediclaim Insurance
  5. Property Insurance
  6. Maritime Insurance

c.Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority

  1. Constitution, Functions and Powers of IRDA

 

Text Books:

  1. Banking and Insurance Law and Practice, Institute of Company Secretaries of India, Taxmann Publishers, 2019

2.M.L. Tannan, Banking Law and Practice in India, Lexis Nexis, 23rd Edition, 2010

Reference Books:

  1. J N Jain and R K Jain, Modern Banking and Insurance – Principles and Techniques, Regal Publications, 2008
  2. Jyotsana Sethi and Nishwar Bhatia, Elements of Banking and Insurance, PHI Publishers, 2nd Edition.
  3. KC Shekhar and Lakshmi Shekhar, Banking Theory and Practice, Vikas Publishing House 2018

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
BANKING AND INSURANCE LAW LWH504 CO1 3 2 2 3 3
CO2 3 2 2 1 1 3
CO3 3 1 3 3 3 _ 3 3
CO4 3 1 2 2 2 3 _ 3

 

 

Course Title/ Code Commercial Arbitration–Theory and Doctrines (LWH505)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The object of the course is to enable students to develop legal strategy to solve disputes in the field of international commerce, through the method of arbitration.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the significance of ADR mechanisms including arbitration Employability
CO2 To Use ADR methods to resolve disputes Employability
CO3 To Interpret the arbitration agreements with respect to the intent of the parties, seat of arbitration, applicable law and other relevant clauses Skill Development
CO4 To Represent the parties in arbitration and appeal proceedings; Skill Development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Alternative Dispute Resolution

  1. Requirement and Importance of Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanisms
  2. Mediation, Conciliation, Negotiation, Arbitration (ad-hoc and institutional)
  3. Similarities and Differences in above methods
  4. Overview of Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996
  5. Doctrine of Competence-Competence
  6. Doctrine of Separability
  7. Arbitrability – Party Autonomy

 

Arbitration Agreement (Sections 7 to 9, AandC Act, 1996)

  1. Drafting and types of arbitration agreement
  2. Referral to arbitration
  3. Interim measures by Court
  4. Choice of Law

 

SECTION B

Arbitral Tribunal (Sections 10 to 15, AandC Act, 1996)

Number of arbitrators

Appointment of arbitrators / Establishment of tribunal

Power and Duties

Grounds for challenge (independence and impartiality)

Challenge procedure (independence – impartiality – conflict of interest)

Termination and substitution of arbitrator

SECTION C

Conduct of Arbitral Proceedings (Section 18 to 27, AandC Act, 1996

Equal treatment

Rules of procedure

Place of arbitration (Seat and Venue)

Commencement of proceedings

Language.

Statements of claim, defence, hearing, written proceedings.

Experts

SECTION D

Award (Sections 28 to 36, AandC Act, 1996)

Making of Award, Form etc

Termination of Proceedings

Set Aside Proceedings – Judicial Review

Finality and enforcement

 

Text Books:

1.Arbitration and Conciliation Act 1996.

2.CR Datta, Law of Arbitration and Conciliation (Including Commercial Arbitration), (2007), LexisNexis.

  1. Halsbury’s Annotated Statutes of India Volume 1 – Arbitration, LexisNexis, (2008).
  2. B S Patil, The Law of Arbitration and Conciliation (2008) Fifth Edition.
  3. Joharis, Commentary on Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996 in 2 vols. Kamal Law House, (2008)

References:

  1. A. Ayyasamy v. A. Paramasivam (2016) 10 SCC 386
  2. Ajar Rab, “Defining the Contours of the Public Policy Exception – A New Test for Arbitrability in India” 7(2) Indiana Journal of Arbitration Law 2019 at 161.
  3. Arbitration and Conciliation Act 1996
  4. Bharat Bhushan Bansal v. U.P. Small Industries Corporation Ltd. (1999) 2 SCC 166
  5. Booz Allen and Hamilton Inc. v. SBI Home Finance Ltd. (2011) 5 SCC 532
  6. Chetan Chawla, “The Muddy Waters of Pre-Arbitration Procedures – Are they Enforceable?” Kluwer Arbitration Blog, 2019
  7. Detlev Kuhner, “The Impact of Party Impecuniosity on Arbitration Agreements” The Example of France and Germany” 31 (6) Journal of International Arbitration 2014
  8. Gary Born and Marija Scekic, “Pre-Arbitration Procedural Requirements” 2015 (OUP Uncorrected Proof- Firstproofs)
  9. Gracious Timothy Dunna and Juhi Gupta, “Existential Crisis of Section 11(6A) of the Indian Arbitration Act? Part -I” Kluwer Arbitration Blog, 2019
  10. Indian Farmers Fertilizer Cooperative Ltd. V. Bhadra Products (2018) 2 SCC 534
  11. KK Modi v. K.N. Modi and Ors. (1998) 3 SCC 573 12. NTPC v. Siemens Atkeingesellschaft (2007) 4 SCC 451

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION-THEORY AND DOCTRINES LWH505 CO1 2 1 2 2 2 1 _ 2 2 3
CO2 1 3 2 1 3 1 _ 2 1 2
CO3 3 2 3 2 3 2 _ 3 3 3
CO4 1 3 3 2 1 2 _ 3 2 3

 

Course Title/ Code Gender Justice (LWH506)
Course Type: Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course objectives The objective of the course is to create awareness among students on the criminal law and criminal justice system pertaining to gender issues.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Get familiarized with feminist discourse and gender terminologies Employability
CO2 To Suggest the changes needed to ensure gender justice Employability
CO3 To Discuss and deliberate on the issues of gender discrimination in India Employability
CO4 To Critically examine the legal provisions through a gender-sensitive lens Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A – GENDER MAINSTREAMING AND LAW (CONTACT HOURS -15)

  1. Broder concept of gender equality –
  2. What is gender justice
    b.Difference between Sex and Gender
    c.Need for Gender Sensitization
  3. Gender Justice and feminist jurisprudence-
  4. Understanding Patriarchy and Matriarchy.
  5. Waves of feminism

SECTION B – GENDER IDENTITY AND EQUALITY (CONTACT HOURS -15)

  1. Deconstructing Man, Woman and Other
  2. Freedom of expression and right to sexual identity.
  3. Legal protection for the LGBTQIA+ people.
  4. Homophobia, Transphobia, Biphobia

SECTION C – GENDER-BASED HARASSMENT (CONTACT HOURS -15)

  1. Public Decency and Morality
  2. Sexual harassment and sexual assault
  3. Immoral Trafficking and Forced Prostitution

SECTION D – GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE AT HOME (CONTACT HOURS -15)

  1. Female Foeticide, Gender Mutilation
  2. Cruelty, Dowry
  3. Domestic Violence
  4. Laws against Rape

Statutes

  1. Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act
  2. Indian Penal Code (1860)
  3. The Protection of Women From Domestic Violence Act (2005)
  4. The Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition and Redressal) Act (2013)

Judgements

  1. National Legal Services Authority v Union of India, (2014) 5 SCC 438
  2. Suresh Kumar Koushal and Anr v Naz Foundation and Others, (2014) 1 SCC 1
  3. National Legal Services Authority v Union of India, (2014) 5 SCC 438
  4. Vishakha v. State of Rajasthan (1997) 6 SCC 241
  5. Faruqui
  6. Avik Sarkar
  7. Jayanti Lal

Reference Material

  1. Amita Dhanda and Archana Parashar Eds., Engendering Law: Essays in Honour Of Lotika Sarkar (Eastern Book Company 1999).
  2. Anca Gheaus, Gender Justice, in Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy, Vol. 6, Jan. 2012
  3. Flavia Agnes, Law And Gender Inequality: The Politics Of Women’s Rights In India (Oxford University Press 2004).
  4. Kalapana Kannabiran Ed., Women and Law: Critical Feminist Perspectives (Sage Publications 2014).
  5. Kamla Bhasin, What is Patriarchy, Kali/Women Unlimited (2004)
  6. Lotika Sarkar, Women And The Law
  7. Mamta Rao, Law Relating to Women and Children, Eastern Book Company, 3rd Edition, 2012

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
GENDER JUSTICE LWH506 CO1 3 2 3 1 1 3 _ 1 2 1
CO2 3 2 3 2 2 3 _ 2 2 2
CO3 3 3 3 3 3 3 _ 3 2 3
CO4 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ 3 2 3

 

Course Title/ Code International Humanitarian and Refugee Law (LWH507)
Course Type Elective
L-T-P-O Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The objective of the course is to provide an in-depth introduction to international refugee law and international humanitarian law. The course will also address cross cutting issues such as ethnicity or religion, which have gained importance in the field of international refugee law.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Identify principles, rules and sources of International Humanitarian Law Employability
CO2 To Discuss and recommend suggestions for protection to victims of wars and civilians in armed conflict Employability
CO3 To Critically examine and analyze the effectiveness of the international legal regime for refugee protection Employability
CO4 To Distinguish between refugees, migrants, and asylum-seekers Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Origin and Development of IHL
  2. Sources of Modern IHL
    1. Hague Conventions, 1899
    2. Geneva Convention 1949 and Additional Protocols
    3. Marten’s Clause
  3. Combatants and Non-Combatants
  4. International and Non-International Armed Conflict

SECTION B

International Crimes (Contact Hours -15)

  1. War crimes and Crimes Against Humanity (Rome Statute – Victimology)
  2. Protected persons and States’ obligation under IHL
    1. Protection of civilians
    2. Protection of women and children
    3. Prisoners of war
    4. Medical and relief personnel
    5. Protection of property
  3. International Instruments
    1. Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, 1948
    2. Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, 1984

SECTION C

Refugee Law (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Introduction
    1. Origin and Development of International Refugee Law
    2. Definition of Refugee, Migrants and asylum seekers
  2. Status of refugee and cessation thereof
  3. Principle of Non-Refoulment
  4. UN Convention on Status of Refugees, 1951 and Additional Protocol, 1967

SECTION D

Legal issues and Refugee Protection (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Legal issues
    1. Citizenship and statelessness
    2. Refugees of International armed Conflict
    3. Refugees of internal armed conflict and civil war
    4. Refugees of ethnic and communal violence
    5. Internally Displaced People
  2. Refugee Protection
    1. Role of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
    2. Refugee protection in India

International Instruments and Documents

  1. Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, 1951
  2. Additional Protocol to 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, 1967
  3. Cartagena Declaration on Refugees, 1984
  4. Hague Conventions, 1899
  5. Geneva Convention 1949 and Additional Protocols
  6. Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, 1948
  7. Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, 1984

References

  1. BS Chimni, International Refugee Law: A Reader, New Delhi: Sage Publications, 2000
  2. James C. Hathaway, The Rights of Refugees under International Law, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2005
  3. Goodwin-Gill, S. Guy, Jane McAdam, The Refugee in International Law, Third Revised Edition, Oxford University Press, 2007
  4. Handbook on Criteria and Procedures Determining the Status of Refugees, UNHCR, Geneva, 1979
  5. Darling, Protection of Stateless Persons in International Asylum and Refugee Law, 21(4) International Journal of Refugee Law (2009), pp. 742-767
  6. James C. Hathaway and Michelle Foster, The Law of Refugee Status, 2nd edn (Cambridge University Press, 2014)

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN AND REFUGEE LAW LWH507 CO1 3 2 2 2 2 2 _ 3 1 3 _ _
CO2 3 3 3 3 2 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _
CO3 3 3 3 3 3 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _
CO4 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _

 

SEMESTER- X

 

Course Code Course Name Course Type (Deptt- Allied/Core/Elective/Audit) Structure Credits
  L T P  
LWH509 Clinic-IV (Professional Ethics and Professional Accounting System) Core 4 0 0 4
LWH510 Private International Law Core 4 0 0 4
LWH511 Interpretation of Statutes Core 4 0 0 4
LWH512 Securities Law and Market Regulations Honours Elective 4 0 0 4
LWH513 International Investment Law Honours Elective 4 0 0 4
LWH514 Cyber Crimes and Law Honours Elective 4 0 0 4
LWH515 International Criminal Law Honours Elective 4 0 0 4
LWO516 Internship Viva-V Honours Elective 0 0 1 1
Semester Credits(L-T-P/Credits) 28 7 1 29

 

 

Course Title/ Code Clinic-IV (Professional Ethics and Professional Accounting System) (LWH509)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives It is an indispensable complementary part of our legal system without the study of which no advocate is suitably equipped with the basic requisites required to go to the court.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Get familiarized with regulations of professional conduct for lawyers Employability
CO2 To Apply principles of professional accountancy Employability
CO3 To Understand the duties and responsibilities of an advocate towards the court, client, opponents and colleagues Employability
CO4 To Demonstrate good judgment consistent with the legal profession’s ethics Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Supreme Court Rules, 2013 (Contact hours-15)

  1. Supreme Court Rules, 2013- Advocates and their Course ofConduct
  2. Role of Single Judge and Registrar of the SupremeCourt
  3. Types of Petition entertained by the Supreme Court, Writ petition, Election Petition
  4. Civil and Criminal Jurisdiction of theCourt

SECTION B

The Limitation Act, 1963 and The RegistrationAct,1908 (Contact hours-15)

  1. Limitation – Procedural Law: Section 5 Condonation of Delay, ss.6-9 Legal Disability, ss.14-15
  2. Exclusion of Time of Proceeding in Good Faith in Wrong Court, ss.18-19Acknowledgement – Substantive Law: S25 Law of Prescription and s27 Adverse Possession, s29 SavingClause
  3. Registration – Compulsory Registered Documentss17; Optional Registrationss18; Time and Place for Registrationss23-31; Effects of Registration and non-Registrationss.47-50

SECTION C

Bench-BarRelations (Contact hours-15)

  1. The Advocates Act,1961
  2. State Bar Council and Bar Council of India: Duties andFunctions
  3. Professional Misconduct and Punishmentss.35
  4. Role and power of Disciplinary Committeess.36-42

SECTION D

Legal Ethics (Contact hours-15)

  1. Code of ethics for Lawyers
  2. Duty to Court, Client, Opponent, Colleagues, along with the Rules of the Bar Council of India
  3. Duty towardsSociety
  4. Role of Law and Legal profession in social transformation.

Tutorial Activities

  • ClientCounselling
  • MockTrial
  • Moot Court
  • Project work on working of BCI and State BarCouncil.

Text Books:

  1. Sanjiva Row The Advocates Act,1961, 2016 (4th), Lexis Nexis
  2. Kailash Rai, Legal Ethics, 2015 (15th), Central Law Publication

References:

  1. P Ramanatha Aiyer, Legal and Professional Ethics: Legal Ethics, Duties and Privileges of a Lawyer, 2010 (3rd), Lexis Nexis
  2. Raju Ramachandran and Gaurav Agarwal, B.R. Agarwala’s Supreme Court Practice and Procedure, 2019 (2nd), Eastern Book Company

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
CLINIC-IV (PROFESSIONAL ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTING SYSTEM) LWH509 CO1 3 3 1 2 2 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _
CO2 2 2 1 2 2 2 _ 3 1 3 _ _
CO3 2 3 2 1 1 3 _ 3 2 3 _ _
CO4 2 3 1 3 3 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _

 

 

Course Title Private International Law (LWH510)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The aim of this module is to provide students with knowledge needed to determine the law applicable to international relationships with respect to private law. To provide a practical and legal background to the nature of private disputes with foreign element and application of the Conflict of Laws to such matters.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Analyse the nature of private disputes with foreign element. Employability
CO2 To Understand and identify the principles of conflict of laws, issue of jurisdiction, relevant foreign laws, recognition and enforcement of foreign judgment. Employability
CO3 To : Apply and counsel the principles of conflict of laws to the matters relating to Marriage, Divorce Guardianship, Adoption and Matrimonial property.

 

Employability
CO4 To  represent the client at appropriate forums to amicably resolve the private matters with foreign element.

 

Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A: PRINCIPLES OF PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW

  1. Nature and scope of Private International Law
  2. Private International Law and Public International Law
  3. Historical Development of Private International Law
  4. Theories of Private International Law
  5. Principle of Renovi
  6. Domicile, Nationality and Citizenship

SECTION B: PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW AND MATRIMONIAL RELATIONSHIPS

  1. Hague Convention: Meaning of “Marriage”, Domicile vis-à-vis Marriage
  2. Lex fori and Lex loci celebrationis
  3. Section 83 of Civil Procedure Code 1908
  4. Divorce, Nullity and Judicial Separation
  5. Contemporary issues related with marriage: Polygamous Marriages, live-in relationships and Same Sex relationships
  6. Case laws relating to NRI marriages and matrimonial disputes.

SECTION C: PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW AND RIGHTS OF CHILDREN

  1. Legitimacy and Legitimation
  2. Child guardianship and custody
  3. Jurisdiction in matters of parental responsibility
  4. Hague Convention, Council of Europe Convention on Contact concerning Children, 2005
  5. Foreign Adoption and surrogacy

SECTION D: PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW AND MATRIMONIAL PROPERTY

  1. Mozambique Rule, Lex Situs
  2. General rules governing Movable and immovable property
  3. Effect of marriage on matrimonial property
  4. Choice of rules in succession of property: Testamentary and intestate

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  1. Student presentation on landmark cases
  2. Analysis and application of International Treaties/Convention on particular situations.
  3. Group discussions on rights of children related to custody, guardianship and adoption.
  4. Collaborative class projects
  5. Roleplays on particular disputes.

Text Books

  1. Dinesh Sabat, Private International Law, Universal Law Publications, Lexis Nexis
  2. G.P. Tripathi, Conflict of Laws,2nd Edition, Allahabad Law Agency (2021)
  3. Paras Diwan, Private International Law, 4th Ed., Deep and Deep (1998)

Reference Books

  1. Cheshire, North and Fawcett: Private International Law, 14th Ed. Oxford University Press (2008)
  2. Dicey, Morris and Collins. (2009). The Conflict of Laws, London: Sweet and Maxwell
  3. C. Govindaraj, Conflict of Laws in India, Oxford University Press (2011)

Journals

  1. Journal of Private International Law, Hart Publishing, 2005
  2. Uniform Law Review (French title Revue de droit uniforme). International Institute for the Unification of Private Law / Oxford University Press, 1973
  3. Yearbook of Private International Law, Otto Schmidt Verlag, 1999 – . Published in association with the Swiss Institute of Comparative Law.

Important Cases

  • A. Ct. Nachiappa Chettiar v. Ct. A. Ct. Subramania Chettiar, AIR 1953 Mad 492
  • V. Elizabeth v. Harwan Investment and Trading Goa, 1993 AIR 1014
  • Ruchi Majoo v. Sanjeev Majoo, AIR 2011 SC 1952
  • Modi Entertainment Network v. W.S. G. Cricket Pvt. Ltd., AIR 2003 SC 1177;
  • Piramal healthcare Ltd. v. DiaSorin S.p.A, Delhi HC, decided on 26 Aug, 2010
  • Central Bank of India v. Ram Narain, AIR 1955 SC 36
  • Kedar Pandey v. Narain Bikram Sah, AIR1966SC160 1
  • P. Joshi v. State of Madhya Pradesh,AIR 1955 SC 334 9
  • Rashid Hasan Roomi v. Union of India, AIR 1967 All 154 13
  • Prakash v. Mst. Shahni, AIR 1965 JandK 83 17
  • Chandigarh Housing Board v. Gurmeet Singh, AIR 2002 SC 587
  • Sankaran Govindan v. Lakshmi Bharathi, AIR 1974 SC 1764
  • Sondur Gopal v. Sondur Rajini, 2013 (9) SCALE 372
  • Lakshmi Sanyal v. S K Dhar, AIR 1972 SC 2667
  • Mira Devi v. Smt. Aman kumari, AIR 1962 Madhya Pradesh 212 38
  • Parwatawwa v. Channawwa, AIR 1966 Mysore 100 44
  • Rosetta Evelyn Attaullah v. Justin Attaullah, AIR 1953 Calcutta 530 60
  • Joao Gloria Pires v. Mrs. Ana Joaquina Rodrigues e Pires, AIR 1967 Goa, Daman and Diu 113 68
  • Satya v. Teja Singh,  AIR 1975 SC 105 73
  • Neeraja Saraph v. Jayant V. Saraph, 1994(4) SCALE 445 85
  • Dhanwanti Joshi v. Madhav, 1998 1 SCC 112
  • Kuldeep Sidhu v. Chaman Singh,  AIR 1989 Punj and Har 103
  • Laxmikant Pandey v. Union of India,  AIR 1984 SC 469

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 Po9 PO10 PS01 PS02
PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW LWH510 CO1 3 2 3 2 2 2 _ 2 1 3 _ _
CO2 3 2 3 2 3 3 _ 2 1 3 _ _
CO3 3 2 3 2 3 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _
CO4 3 3 3 2 3 3 _ 3 1 3 _ _

 

 

Course Title/ Code Interpretation of Statutes (LWH511)
Course Type Core (Departmental)
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The paper is aimed to enhance the critical skills to equip the students with various aspects of interpretations
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain and illustrate the difference between statutory interpretation and construction. Employability
CO2 To Utilise the internal aides in comprehending a legislative document. Employability
CO3 To Make use of external aides such as policy documents while interpreting a statute. Employability
CO4 To Apply the primary rules of interpretation to decide varying cases involving international and municipal legislations. Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Contact hours-15)

  1. Difference Between Construction and Interpretation; Concept and Power of Interpretation; Literal Construction
  2. General Principles of interpretation
  3. The Primary rule: Literal interpretation
  4. The other main Principles of interpretation

SECTION B

Internal Aids to Interpretation (Contact hours-15)

  1. Title; Preamble; Heading; Marginal Note
  2. Section; Sub-section; Punctuation; Illustration; Exception
  3. Proviso; Explanation; Saving Clause; Schedule

SECTION C

External Aids to Interpretation (Contact hours-15)

  1. Constituent Assembly Debates for Constitutional Interpretation
  2. Constitution of India
  3. Legislative History: Legislative Intention
  4. Statement of Objects and Reasons
  5. Legislative Debates
  6. Committee Reports, Law Commission Reports

SECTION D

Rules of Interpretation (Contact hours-15)

  1. Literal Rule
  2. Golden Rule
  3. Mischief Rule
  4. Legal Fiction
  5. Ejusdem generis
  6. Noscitur asociis
  7. Reddendo singulasingulis
  8. Generalia specialibus nonderogant

Tutorial Activities

  • Judgments and Statutes Analysis
  • Judgment Writing
  • Problem Solving
  • Exercise of Drafting a Statute

Text Books:

  1. D.N Mathur, Interpretation of Statutes, 2015, Central Law Publications
  2. N.S. Bindra, Interpretation of Statutes, 2013, Lexis Nexis

Reference:

  1. D.D. Basu, Limited Government and Judicial Review, 2015, Lexis Nexis
  2. G.P. Singh, Principles of Statutory Interpretation, 2016 (14th Edn.) Lexis Nexis
  3. Jeremy Bentham, Theory of Legislation, Butter worth’s Publications.
  4. Maxwell, Interpretation of Statutes, 2010, Lexis Nexis
  5. P.M. Bakshi, Interpretation of Statutes, 2008, Orient Publisher
  6. Vepa P. Sarathi, Interpretation of Statutes, 2010 (5th Edn.), Eastern Book Company

Important Cases

  1. Ashbury Railway Carriage and Iron Co. v. Riche (1875) LR 7 HL 653
  2. N. Mutto v. T.K. Nandi (Dr.) (1979) 1 SCC 361
  3. Biswambhar Singh v. State of Orissa, AIR 1954 SC 139:1954 SCR 842
  4. Brownsea Havens Properties v. Poole Corpn. (1958) 1 All ER 205
  5. Calcutta Municipal Corporation v. East India Hotels Ltd., AIR 1996 SC 419
  6. Commissioner of Income-tax v. Smt. Sodra Devi, AIR 1957 SC 832
  7. Narayanaswami v. Pannersevan (1972) 3 SCC 717
  8. Heydon’s case (1584) 3 Co. Rep. 7
  9. Jugalkishore v. Raw Cotton Co. AIR 1955 SC 376
  10. Lee v. Knapp (1967) 2 Q.B.442
  11. V. Joshiv. M.U. Shimpi, AIR 1961 SC 1494
  12. M/s. Hiralal Rattanlal v. State of U.P. (1973)1 SCC 216
  13. M/s. Motipur Zamindary Co. (Private) Ltd. v. State of Bihar, AIR 1962 SC 660
  14. Manoharlal v.State of Punjab, AIR 1961 SC 418: (1961) 2 SCR 343
  15. Matthews v. Dobbins [1963] 1 ALL ER 417
  16. Nokes v. Doncaster Amalgamated Collieries (1940) AC 1014
  17. Oswal Agro Mills Ltd. v. CCE, 1993 Supp (3) SCC 716
  18. M.D.C. v. Union of India, AIR 1957 SC 628
  19. Ramavtar Budhaiprasad v. Assistant Sales Tax Officer, AIR 1961 SC 1325
  20. R. Chaudhary v. State of Punjab (2001) 7 SCC 126
  21. Shashi Kant Laxman Kale v. Union of India, AIR 1990 SC 2114: (1990) 4SCC366
  22. Smith v. Hughes (1960) 1 W.L.R.830
  23. State of Mysore v. R.V. Bidap, AIR 1973 SC 255
  24. State of West Bengal v. Wasi Ahmed (1977) 2 SCC 246
  25. Tej Kiran Jain v. N. Sanjiva Reddy (1970) 2 SCC 272
  26. The Queen v. Charles Arthur Hill Heaten Ellis (1844) 6 Q.B. 499
  27. Union of Indiav. Filip Tiago De Gama of Vedem Vasco De Gama, AIR 1980 SC 981: (1990) 1 SCC 277
  • CO-PO MAPPING
Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
INTERPRETATION OF STATUTES LWH511 CO1 3 1 3 2 2 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _
CO2 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _
CO3 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _
CO4 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _

 

 

Course Title/ Code Securities Law and Market Regulations (LWH512)
Course Type Honours Elective
Credits 4
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Course Objective  
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Describe the types of Securities that the companies may issue and which may be listed on stock exchanges Employability
CO2 To Advice and counsel the companies on the matters relating to issue of securities Employability
CO3 To Guide the companies on the compliance with relevant rules and regulations relating to listing of securities on the stock exchange Employability
CO4 To Represent the parties at the appropriate forum on the matters involving securities disputes Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to Capital Markets and Securities (Contact Hours- 15)

  1. Overview of Capital market
    1. Capital Markets in India
    2. Authorities governing capital markets in India
  2. Concept of Securities
    1. Types of securities: Equity, Debentures, Preference, Equity, non-voting, share warrants, Employee Stock Options, Issue and Listing and delisting of Shares
  3. Stock Exchanges – Registration and Regulations
    1. Securities Contract (Regulation) Act 1956
    2. Registration of Stock Exchanges
    3. Powers of stock exchanges to make rules and bye-laws
    4. Clearing Corporations and Its functions

SECTION B

Issue and Listing of Shares (Contact Hours- 15)

  1. Securities Contract (Regulation) Act 1956
  2. Depositories Act, 1996
  3. Companies Act 2013 – Issue of Securities
  4. SEBI (Issue of Capital and Disclosure Requirements) Regulations 2018
  5. SEBI (Listing Obligations and Disclosure Requirements) Regulations 2015

SECTION C

Capital Market Securities Regulations (Contact Hours- 15)

  1. SEBI (Substantial Acquisition of Shares and Takeover) Regulations 2011
  2. SEBI (buyback of Securities) Regulations 2018
  3. SEBI (Prohibition of Insider Trading) Regulations, 2015
  4. FEMA Regulations
  5. SEBI (Delisting of Equity Shares) Regulations, 2009 : Delisting of Equity Shares; Voluntary Delisting; Exit Opportunity; Compulsory Delisting.

SECTION D

Capital Market Regulator (Contact Hours- 15)

  1. SEBI Act 1992 – Role, Powers and Functions of SEBI
  2. SEBI (Ombudsman) Regulations 2003

 

 

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 Po2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 Po10 PS01 PS02
SECURITIES LAW AND MARKET REGULATIONS LWH512 CO1 3 1 3 2 2 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _
CO2 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _
CO3 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _
CO4 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _

 

Course Title/ Code International Investment Law (LWH513)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The course covers the main principles of international law of foreign investment governing international economic relations between States. Areas covered are the evolution of the law of foreign investment, international efforts to regulate foreign investment, regulation under bilateral investment treaties, free trade agreements and regional trade and investment agreements, and the case law developed by various international courts and tribunals, including the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes. The major focus of the course is to examine whether the rules of international investment law reconcile the protection of foreign investment with the host State’s right to regulate. The course will also endeavor to look at the investment treaty practice of India.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Identify the basic principles of International Investment Law Employability
CO2 To Understand the importance of International Investment as a regulatory tool in international economic law Employability
CO3 To Explain the various aspects of investment treaties and establish their linkage with investor protection and the regulatory discretion of the sovereign countries Employability
CO4 To Advise the clients on rules relating to dispute resolution in the matters of International Investment Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Defining ‘investment’ and ‘foreign’ investment. Various types of investment and application of existing rules to new types of investment
  2. Foreign investments in historical context.
  3. Advent of Foreign investments in India and its development.

 

SECTION B

Regulation of Foreign Investment (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Historical trends in regulation of foreign investments
  2. Perspectives and emergence of bilateral, regional and multilateral Investments Treaties.
  3. Responsibilities of foreign investors vis-a-vis environment, human rights and other municipal concerns of host states

SECTION C

Remedies for Foreign Investors (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Trends and issues in treaty based remedies for foreign investors.
  2. Fork in the road and the umbrella clauses.
  3. Overview of foreign arbitral institutions.
  4. Remedies of Foreign Investment in India’s Model BIT 2016

SECTION D

Settlement of Investment Disputes(Contact Hours -15)

  1. National courts as a forum for settlement of investment disputes.
  2. International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes.
  3. Arbitration under the UNCITRAL Rules. Permanent Court of Arbitration.
  4. A permanent investment court? Proposals for the reform of the current system of investor-state dispute settlement..

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Analysis of Legal perspective of Investment law by newspaper cutting
  • Open Book Quiz
  • Regular assignments on reading relevant portions of Investment law land mark judgments
  • Discussions on legal dimensions of Investment Market
  • Mock Interviews, group discussions

Textbooks:

  1. The Backlash against Investment Arbitration: Perceptions and Reality, Edited by Michael Waibel, Published by Kluwer Law International, (2010)
  2. The International Law on Foreign Investment, M. Sornarajah, Third Edition, Cambridge University Press, (2010)
  3. Principle of international investment law, Rudolf Dolzer and Christoph Schreuer, Oxford; 2 edition (November 2018)
  4. The International Centre for Settlement of Investment Dispute: Bilateral Investment Treaties, Rudolf Dolzer and Margrete Stevens, Published by Martinus Nijhoff, (1995)

Reference Books:

  1. Campbell Mc Lachlan, Laurence Shore and Matthew Weiniger, International Investment Arbitration: Substantive Principles, Oxford University Press, 1st ed, 2008.
  2. Todd Weiler, International Investment Law and Arbitration: Leading Cases from the ICSID, NAFTA, Bilateral Treaties and Customary International Law, Cameron,2005.

Journals/Articles/Reports:

  1. Vandevelde J. Kenneth ,The Economics of Bilateral Investment Treaties,41 HARV. INT’L L.J. 469, 471 (2000).
  2. Jhangiani Sapna and Matthews P.Joseph , ‘White Industries’ and State Responsibility: Lesser-Known Facts about the Case as Discussed during the 2014 ICCA Young Arbitration Practitioners Conference, KLUWER ARBITRATION BLOG (2019)
  3. Ranjan Prabhash and Anand Pushkar ‘More than a BIT of Protectionism’ The Hindu, December, 14 2016
  4. Tai-Heng Cheng, Precedent and Control in Investment Treaty, Fordham International Law Journal, Volume 30, Issue 4 (2006)
  5. Calvin A. Hamilton and Paula I. Rochwerger “Trade and investment: foreign direct investment through bilateral and multilateral treaties” New York state bar association international law and practice section ISSN 1050 – 9453
  6. Joshua Robbins “The Emergence of Positive Obligations in Bilateral Investment Treaties” 13 U. Miami Int’l and Comp. L. Rev. 403 2005-2006
  7. Ahmad Ali Ghouri “Investment treaty arbitration and the development of International Investment Law as a Collective Value System: A synopsis of a new synthesis” Journal of World Investment and Trade Vol.10, No. 6, pp. 921-935, December 2009

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcome PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT LAW LWH513 CO1 3 2 2 2 3 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _
CO2 3 2 2 3 3 3 _ _ 1 2 _ _
CO3 3 2 2 2 3 3 _ _ 1 3 _ _
CO4 3 2 3 3 3 3 _ _ 1 3 _ _

 

Course Title/ Code Cyber Crimes and Law (LWH514)
Course Type Honours Elective
Credits 4
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Course Objective  
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Explain the typology of cybercrimes and legal framework dealing with them Employability
CO2 To Evaluate and establish the connect between cyber law and fundamental rights Employability
CO3 To Advise on the issues relating to cyber world and suggest on the related legal framework Employability
CO4 To Represent the parties at appropriate forum in the matters involving IT Act Skill development
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Fundamentals of Cyber Crime (Contact Hours – 15)

  1. Cyber Crimes: Meaning, Nature and Significance of studying cyber Crimes
  2. Kinds of Cyber Crime- hacking, spamming, phishing, cyber stalking, cyber pornography, Digital Fraud.
  3. Legal Framework relating to punishments

SECTION B

Cyber Crimes – Investigation and Trial (Contact Hours – 15)

  1. Investigation into cybercrimes – Relevant authorities and their powers
  2. Validity of Electronic Records and Procedures, Digital Signatures
  3. Cyber Authorities to conduct trial and impose punishments

SECTION C

Cyber World and Fundamental Rights (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Role and Need of Cyber World
  2. Freedom of Speech and Expression in cyber world
  3. Effect of Shreya Singhal v. Union of India Judgment on online freedom of speech and expression.
  4. Privacy in Cyber World

SECTION D

Rights and Obligations in Cyber World (Contact Hours -15)

  1. Concept of Property in cyber world
  2. Introduction to E-commerce, E-Transactions and E-contracts
  3. IPR in the Cyber world

Application of Copyright Act, Trademarks Act and Patent Act in India for the protection and preservation of IPR in Cyberspace

 

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Discussions/debates and webinars
  • Google Form Quiz
  • Simulations
  • Regular assignments on reading relevant portions of land mark judgments
  • Discussions on legal dimensions of newly released movies/serials
  • Moot Courts and collaborative projects, group discussions.

Text Books:

  1. Pavan Duggal, Cyber Law, 2nd Edition, Lexis Nexis
  2. Sushma Arora and Raman Arora, Cyber Crimes and Laws- -Taxmann’s

Reference Books

  1. Ian. J. Lyod, Information technology law
  2. Yee fen Lim, Cyber space law commentaries and Materials.
  3. Yatindra Sinha, Cyber law
  4. Apar Gupta, Commentaries on Information technology Act
  5. George B. Delta, Law of the Internet
  6. Orin S. Kerr, Computer Crime Law: American Casebook Series (2006) (ISBN:0314144005).
  7. Ralph D. Clifford, Cybercrime: The Investigation, Prosecution And Defense Of A Computer-Related Crime (Second Edition 2006) (ISBN:0890897239).
  8. Samuel C. McQuade, III, Understanding And Managing Cybercrime (2006) (ISBN:020543973X).
  9. Peter Stephenson, Investigating Computer Related Crime (2000) (ISBN:0849322189).
  10. Joel McNamara, Secrets Of Computer Espionage: Tactics And Countermeasures (2003) (ISBN:0764537105).
  • CO-PO MAPPING
Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
CYBER CRIMES AND LAW LWH514 CO1 3 3 2 1 _ _ _ _
CO2 3 1 2 2 3 _ _ _ _
CO3 2 3 2 3 2 _ _ _ _
CO4 2 3 3 3 3 1 _ _ 2 _ _

 

 

Course Title/ Code International Criminal Law (LWH515)
Course Type Honours Elective
L-T-P Structure (4-1-0)
Credits 4
Course Objectives The aim of this course to make the students understand the concept of international criminal law, observe and analyse the differences in the jurisdictions of the international criminal court and the jurisdictions of the International Criminal Tribunal. A comprehensive analysis of all provisions and jurisprudence developed by various tribunals shall be discussed.The topics are chosen carefully so that the students may be encouraged to pursue their interest in the area of international criminal law.
Course Outcomes (COs) Mapping (Employment, Skill Development/Entreprenership)
CO1 To Describe the concept, sources and nature of international criminal law Employability
CO2 To Explain the typology of international crimes including aggression, crimes against humanity and war crimes Employability
CO3 To Evaluate the jurisdiction and working of international criminal court and tribunals Employability
CO4 To Identify the actor for fixing criminal liability and responsibility of international crimes Employability
Prerequisites (if any)  

 

SECTION A

Introduction to International Criminal Law (Contact Hours – 15)

  1. Historical background of International Criminal Law
  2. The concept and sources of International Criminal Law
  3. Paris Conference and Treaty of Versailles
  4. International Military Tribunals – Nuremberg and Tokyo
  5. State Soverignty and International Criminal Law

SECTION B

International Crimes (Contact Hours – 15)

  1. Elements of International Crime
  2. Crimes of Aggression
  3. Crimes against humanity – murder, torture, slavery, apartheid etc.
  4. War crimes and Geneva conventions
  5. Genocide

SECTION C

International Criminal Court and Tribunals (Contact Hours – 15)

  1. International Criminal Court
  2. International Criminal Court’s Jurisdictions over the nationals of Non-state parties
  3. International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia(ICTY)
  4. International Criminal Tribunal of Rwanda(ICTR)

SECTION D

Criminal Responsibility (Contact Hours – 15)

  1. State Responsibility
  2. Individual Criminal Responsibility
  3. Superior Responsibility
  4. Defences

Tutorial activities 1 Hr/Week

  • Discussions/debates and webinars
  • Google Form Quiz
  • Simulations
  • Regular assignments on reading relevant portions of land mark judgments
  • Discussions on legal dimensions of newly released movies/serials
  • Moot Courts and collaborative projects, group discussions

Text Books

  1. William A Schabas, The Cambridge Companion to international Law
  2. Gerhard Werle and Florian Jebberger, Principles of International Criminal Law

Reference Material:

  1. Robert Cryer, et al., International Criminal Law and Procedure, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2010.
  2. Philippe Sands, From Nuremberg to the Hague: The Future of International Criminal Justice, Cambridge University Press, 2003
  3. Bassioni, M., C. (ed.) The Legislative History of International Criminal Court, Ardsley, Transnational Publishers, 2003.
  4. Cassese, A. International Criminal Law, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2008.
  5. Schabas, W., An Introduction to International Criminal Court, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2010.
  6. The International Criminal Court: Challenges to Achieving Justice and Accountability in the 21st Century by Mark S. Ellis; Richard J. Goldstone. International Debate Education Association, 2008.
  7. International Criminal Law: Cases and Commentary (Paperback) By (author) Antonio Cassese, By (author) Guido Acquaviva, By Mary De Ming Fan, Alex Whiting
  8. Martin Dixon, Textbook on International Law, 7th ed (Oxford University Press, 2013) (paying particular attention to chapters 1 (nature of international law), 2 (sources of international law), 4 (international law and national law), and 6 (jurisdiction));
  9. James Crawford and Martti Koskenniemi (eds), Cambridge Companion to International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2012); or
  10. Vaughan Lowe, International Law (Clarendon Press, 2007).

CO-PO MAPPING

Course Course Code Course Outcomes PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PS01 PS02
INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW LWH515 CO1 3 3 2 1 _ _ _ _
CO2 3 1 2 2 3 _ _ _ _
CO3 2 3 2 3 2 _ _ _ _
CO4 2 3 3 3 3 1 _ _ 2 _ _

 

 

 

Career opportunities (in Bullets)

The diverse career options that a law degree offers is unmatched by any other professional degree. Law is a multi-disciplinary endeavour and draws from other disciplines, for instance, a criminal lawyer needs to have some understanding of human psychology and forensic science, and a corporate lawyer must have some understanding of commerce and capital. There is a plethora of opportunities for a law graduate like

  • Litigation – practicing in the District Courts/ various High Courts and the Supreme Court of India
  • UPSC
  • Judicial Services
  • Armed Forces (Judge Advocate General)
  • NGOs
  • Legal Editor
  • Legal Journalist
  • Legal Advisor for MNCs
  • Legal officers for Banks and Insurance Companies, LPOs, KPOs